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Interior of the Rangiatea Maori Church, Otaki

Interior of the Rangiatea Maori Church, Otaki

Rangiātea Church in Otaki, New Zealand was the oldest Māori Anglican church in New Zealand. In 1848, Te Rauparaha who had just returned to Otaki from Australia, issued the challenge of building the church to the chief of Te Wehiwehi, who accepted. It was built under the direction of Te Rauparaha and English missionary Octavius Hadfield. During the original construction large tōtara logs had to be floated down rivers at nearby Ohau and Waikawa. The logs became the ridge pole and the central pillars of the church. The rafters, pillars and slabs were also made from tōtara. The design of the church is unique in that it incorporates ideas from both English and Māori church design. Completed in 1851, the building was burnt down by an arsonist in 1995, and by 2003 the church had been completely rebuilt. Also see 2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008505 and 2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008507

 
Page 1: Interior of the Rangiatea Maori Church, Otaki

Interior of the Rangiatea Maori Church, Otaki

Rangiātea Church in Otaki, New Zealand was the oldest Māori Anglican church in New Zealand. In 1848, Te Rauparaha who had just returned to Otaki from Australia, issued the challenge of building the church to the chief of Te Wehiwehi, who accepted. It was built under the direction of Te Rauparaha and English missionary Octavius Hadfield. During the original construction large tōtara logs had to be floated down rivers at nearby Ohau and Waikawa. The logs became the ridge pole and the central pillars of the church. The rafters, pillars and slabs were also made from tōtara. The design of the church is unique in that it incorporates ideas from both English and Māori church design. Completed in 1851, the building was burnt down by an arsonist in 1995, and by 2003 the church had been completely rebuilt.2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008505 and 2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008506

 
Page 1: Rangiātea Maori Church, Otaki

Rangiātea Maori Church, Otaki

Rangiātea Church in Otaki, New Zealand was the oldest Māori Anglican church in New Zealand. In 1848, Te Rauparaha who had just returned to Otaki from Australia, issued the challenge of building the church to the chief of Te Wehiwehi, who accepted. It was built under the direction of Te Rauparaha and English missionary Octavius Hadfield. During the original construction large tōtara logs had to be floated down rivers at nearby Ohau and Waikawa. The logs became the ridge pole and the central pillars of the church. The rafters, pillars and slabs were also made from tōtara. The design of the church is unique in that it incorporates ideas from both English and Māori church design. Completed in 1851, the building was burnt down by an arsonist in 1995, and by 2003 the church had been completely rebuilt. Also see 2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008506 and 2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008507.

 
Rostrata Nurse Aids

Rostrata Nurse Aids

This photograph shows a group of nurse aids employed at Rostrata Maternity Home. The only identified person is Zena Bourke, who stands second from right. The building was situated on the corner of Ruahine and Ferguson Streets and owned by E B Watson who ran it as a private maternity hospital for many years. Mrs E Dujany later held the lease until 1949. The Palmerston North Hospital Board took over maternity services until 1962, when Rostrata was closed due to the Palmerston North Hospital adding 40 more beds to its Maternity section. In the 13 years that the board had Rostrata, there were 6119 patients and 5230 births. The 1973 owner converted the building into flats from the original two houses joined by annexes on the one acre section. The old trees, including a large Australian red gum will remain.

 
Rostrata Nurse Aids

Rostrata Nurse Aids

This photograph shows a group of nurse aids employed at Rostrata Maternity Home. Zena Bourke can be seen first on the left (standing) and the matron is fifth from left (standing). The building was situated on the corner of Ruahine and Ferguson Streets and owned by E B Watson who ran it as a private maternity hospital for many years. Mrs E Dujany later held the lease until 1949. The Palmerston North Hospital Board took over maternity services until 1962, when Rostrata was closed due to the Palmerston North Hospital adding 40 more beds to its Maternity section. In the 13 years that the board had Rostrata, there were 6119 patients and 5230 births. The 1973 owner converted the building into flats from the original two houses joined by annexes on the one acre section. The old trees, including a large Australian red gum remained.

 
Taonui Street - Winstone Ltd

Taonui Street - Winstone Ltd

Winstone Ltd was established in Palmerston North around 1930 as a supplier of building materials. It later expanded to sub-contracting and tile making. The office and showroom was added to the existing building in Lombard Street c 1963.

 
Women working on Farm During World War II, Palmerston North

Women working on Farm During World War II, Palmerston North

After work, this group of women went haymaking at the Fitzherbert property in Ihaka Street, Palmerston North, as part of the war effort. From left: Unknown; Eileen Redwood, worked at the Bank of New Zealand (later Mrs Kingston); Rona Fenwick(?), worked at the Palmerston North City Council (later Mrs Jim McDavitt); Mrs Spike Moore, her husband worked for an oil company; June Allen, worked for Johnston and Co, King Street, grocery and wine/spirits wholesalers (later Mrs Blennerhassett); Edna Spillman, worked at Johnston and Co (later Mrs Quarrie).

 
Page 1: Aerial View of the Square and Main Street East
Page 2: Aerial View of the Square and Main Street East

Aerial View of the Square and Main Street East

Running from the top of The Square to the top right hand corner is Rangitikei Street, and Church Street East runs from the bottom right corner to The Square. Through the centre of The Square can be seen the railway line, which ran down Main Street, on both sides of The Square, until it closed in 1964. The slight bend in the rail line in The Square, as seen, was paid for by the Palmerston North Borough Council to accommodate the war memorial in the centre (indistinct), when it built in 1926. The Hopwood clock tower, erected 1957, can be seen without its permanent cross (not added until 1981). Distinctly can be seen the four quadrants and the centre strip, divided by the roads which ran into The Square for a long period of time. Today (2014) The Square has returned to its original one block of land.

 
C M Ross Co. Ltd advertisment in theatre programme

C M Ross Co. Ltd advertisment in theatre programme

C M Ross Co Ltd celebrated 50 years of trading in 1932.. C M Ross Co. Ltd was one of the foremost department stores of Palmerston North and operated in The Square from 1883 until it was sold to Milne and Choyce in 1959. The advertisement was on the centrefold of the Manawatu Repertory Society's programme for their production of 'Loyalties' by John Galsworthy. The centrefold also features the cast of the production.

 
Milne and Choyce advertising poster for a Furnishing Sale

Milne and Choyce advertising poster for a Furnishing Sale

Poster advertising a Furnishing Sale, created by Allan Smith while working in the Display Department of Milne and Choyce. He was first employed by the C M Ross department store in 1959, which was then bought out by Milne and Choyce. He rose to become Display Manager. Milne and Choyce operated in The Square, Palmerston North 1959-1966. Black, white and red on board, for display in the store

 
Milne and Choyce advertising poster for Mother’s Day

Milne and Choyce advertising poster for Mother’s Day

Poster advertising Mother's Day 8th May, created by Allan Smith while working in the Display Department of Milne and Choyce. He was first employed by the C M Ross department store in 1959, which was then bought out by Milne and Choyce. He rose to become Display Manager. Milne and Choyce operated in The Square, Palmerston North 1959-1966. Coloured, on board, for display in the store.

 
Milne and Choyce advertising poster for Mother’s Day

Milne and Choyce advertising poster for Mother’s Day

Poster advertising Mother's Day 13th May, created by Allan Smith while working in the Display Department of Milne and Choyce. He was first employed by the C M Ross department store in 1959, which was then bought out by Milne and Choyce. He rose to become Display Manager. Milne and Choyce operated in The Square, Palmerston North 1959-1966. Black, white and gold on board, for display in the store.

 
Milne and Choyce advertising poster for a Summer Sale

Milne and Choyce advertising poster for a Summer Sale

Poster advertising a Summer Sale, created by Allan Smith while working in the Display Department of Milne and Choyce. He was first employed by the C M Ross department store in 1959, which was then bought out by Milne and Choyce. He rose to become Display Manager. Milne and Choyce operated in The Square, Palmerston North 1959-1966. Coloured on board, for display in the store.

 
Milne and Choyce advertising poster for a Fashion Clearance Sale

Milne and Choyce advertising poster for a Fashion Clearance Sale

Poster advertising a 3 day fasion clearance sale, created by Allan Smith while working in the Display Department of Milne and Choyce. He was first employed by the C M Ross department store in 1959, which was then bought out by Milne and Choyce. He rose to become Display Manager. Milne and Choyce operated in The Square, Palmerston North 1959-1966. Coloured, on board for display in the store.

 
Milne and Choyce advertising poster for Christmas

Milne and Choyce advertising poster for Christmas

Poster advertising Christmas, created by Allan Smith while working in the Display Department of Milne and Choyce. He was first employed by the C M Ross department store in 1959, which was then bought out by Milne and Choyce. He rose to become Display Manager. Milne and Choyce operated in The Square, Palmerston North 1959-1966. The poster depicts the 3 wise men and 'The Golden Glory of Christmas. Giving... inspired by Milne and Choyce'. In black and gold on board, for display in the store.

 
Milne and Choyce Showroom staff

Milne and Choyce Showroom staff

Staff of the women's fashion showroom posing with a trophy. From left: Molly Cotton; Miss Floyd; Mrs Boyle; Molly King; ?; Trish ?; Mrs Ciochetto; Peg McNabb; Gaye Chamberlain (later Ware). Gaye Ware was employed by C M Ross and Milne and Choyce between 1957-1963. Milne and Choyce was one of the foremost department stores of Palmerston North. The business was bought from C M Ross Co. Ltd in 1959 and was sold to the D I C in 1966.

 
Gaye Ware modelling at Milne and Choyce

Gaye Ware modelling at Milne and Choyce

Gaye Ware worked in the Women's fashion showroom 1957-1963, first for C M Ross Co. Ltd, then for Milne and Choyce. She would sometimes model for the fashion parades that were held in the Milne and Choyce Coffee Bar. Milne and Choyce was one of the foremost department stores of Palmerston North. The business was bought from C M Ross Co. Ltd in 1959 and was sold to the D I C in 1966.

 
C M Ross Co. Ltd tearooms staff

C M Ross Co. Ltd tearooms staff

The Rosco tearooms, with their rosewood pannelled walls and columns, was one of the most elegant eating places in Palmerston North. It was also hired out for functions. Tearoom staff in uniform, from left: Grace Dempsey; Meryle Anderson; Prudence Phillips; Gladys Wischnowski; Pam Blane; Sylvia Matson; Valerie Dempsey (later Ackerman). C M Ross Co. Ltd was one of the foremost department stores of Palmerston North and operated in The Square from 1883 until it was sold to Milne and Choyce in 1959.

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