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"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, (both seen here carrying the wreath) and Unionist Alan Millar (to their right). The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.

“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.

“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”

The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

"2000 in Peaceful March Against War"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 1st of May 1970. "Two thousand people sat and stood in front of the Palmerston North Clock Tower last night and sang “We Shall Live in Peace” as the climax to probably the biggest protest march held in Palmerston North.”

An estimated 1700 people gathered at the Opera House carpark and were joined by a few hundred more along the way. They marched silently, making a quiet shuffling sound as they filled Broadway. The Protestors were from all walks of life and many organisations were represented, including Unions, Churches, Students, and the Mongrel Mob.

The March was organised by the Palmerston North Anti-war Mobilisation Committee, including R. Lyall, Massey University Student Association President Gary Emms, and Unionist Alan Millar. The Nash Street Jug Band lead the singing and Hana Burke sang ‘a Maori song of parting’. Poetry was read by Mr. Lyall and Des Woods. The Reverend Loyal Gibson of the Trinity Methodist Church lead prayers after Churches across the city rang their bells in solidarity.
“After the Demonstration Mr Millar said ‘The silent majority is starting to speak. Sir Keith Holyoake can no longer pretend that the majority of New Zealander’s are in favour of the war. These people hear tonight are telling him one thing; Stop the war and get all New Zealand troops out.’”
The marchers were heckled by a small number standing outside a pub and from a few cars. Six people heckled speakers from within the crowd.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
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