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Dog in Dog House

Dog in Dog House

This photograph was created by William James Young in the early 20th century. A large variety of subjects are depicted in the collection, but family, rural life and travel are the most prominent themes. The exact location of the photographs in the Young Collection is unknown, but W J Young lived on a farm in Mt Stewart, Rangitikei, and some of the photographs include his house. The Young family were apparently avid travellers and photographs later in the collection feature scenes from Rotorua, Auckland, Whanganui, as well as other unidentified locations. The portraits are all unidentified, but are presumably of members of the Young family. The photographers parents were George Henry (b 1833) and Jane McDowell (b 1842, d 1916). They came to New Zealand in 1877. The same year, they bought the home farm on Mt Stewart and called it Kilrudden after Kilrudden House, the home of the McDowell family in Ireland. The couple had four children: Ann (b 1873), Margaret (b 1876), John (b 1878) and William James (b 1880). William James married Mary Elizabeth Thompson and they had four children: Doris (b 1914, d 1989), George (b 1916, d 1991), Royden McDowell (b 1925, d 1992) and Noel William (b 1927, d 2013).

 
Caccia Birch House

Caccia Birch House

Caccia Birch House was designed by L. G. West and built for Jacob Nannestad, a sawmiller, in about 1892. After being sold to Jack Strang in 1903 the house was extensively enlarged, both by him and by the New Zealand Government during the time it was leased to them for use as Government House (1908-1910). In 1921 the house was sold to William Caccia Birch. After Caccia Birch's death it was gifted to the NZ Government, in 1941, and was variously used by the army in WWII, as a convalescent home for nurses, and by both Victoria and Massey Universities. The house has been owned by Palmerston North City Council since 1984 and has been restored and renovated as a conference and function centre. It is a Category 1 listed building with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust because of its historical and architectural and community significance.

 
Caccia Birch House

Caccia Birch House

Caccia Birch House was designed by L. G. West and built for Jacob Nannestad, a sawmiller, in about 1892. After being sold to Jack Strang in 1903 the house was extensively enlarged, both by him and by the New Zealand Government during the time it was leased to them for use as Government House (1908-1910). In 1921 the house was sold to William Caccia Birch. After Caccia Birch's death it was gifted to the NZ Government, in 1941, and was variously used by the army in WWII, as a convalescent home for nurses, and by both Victoria and Massey Universities. The house has been owned by Palmerston North City Council since 1984 and has been restored and renovated as a conference and function centre. It is a Category 1 listed building with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust because of its historical and architectural and community significance.

 
Railway Yard, Unidentified

Railway Yard, Unidentified

This photograph was created by William James Young in the early 20th century. A large variety of subjects are depicted in the collection, but family, rural life and travel are the most prominent themes. The exact location of the photographs in the Young Collection is unknown, but W J Young lived on a farm in Mt Stewart, Rangitikei, and some of the photographs include his house. The Young family were apparently avid travellers and photographs later in the collection feature scenes from Rotorua, Auckland, Whanganui, as well as other unidentified locations. The portraits are all unidentified, but are presumably of members of the Young family. The photographers parents were George Henry (b 1833) and Jane McDowell (b 1842, d 1916). They came to New Zealand in 1877. The same year, they bought the home farm on Mt Stewart and called it Kilrudden after Kilrudden House, the home of the McDowell family in Ireland. The couple had four children: Ann (b 1873), Margaret (b 1876), John (b 1878) and William James (b 1880). William James married Mary Elizabeth Thompson and they had four children: Doris (b 1914, d 1989), George (b 1916, d 1991), Royden McDowell (b 1925, d 1992) and Noel William (b 1927, d 2013).

 
Caccia Birch House

Caccia Birch House

An exterior view of Caccia Birch House. The house has been owned by Palmerston North City Council since 1984 and has been restored and renovated as a conference and function centre. It is a Category 1 listed building with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust because of its historical and architectural and community significance

 
A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

This photograph of The Square was taken in the vicinity of the Manawatu Standard building. In the foreground is the Lakelet (or Butterfly Lake), followed by the Phoenix Palms that once lived in The Square. The tall building to the right is the The Commercial Union Building, situated on the corner of Rangitikei and King Streets. It was completed in March 1973. In front of this is the former Bank of New Zealand. It was demolished for a new multi-storey BNZ. to the other side of the Rangitikei Street corner can be seen the multi-storey MCL building.

 
A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

Looking across The Square to the Grand Hotel, built 1906. To the left can be seen the Occidental Hotel opposite the Bank of New Zealand, on the corner of Fitzherbert Avenue. In the foreground can be seen the statue of Te Peeti Te Awe Awe erected in 1907, and behind, the observatory and cannon before the Lakelets were constructed and opened in 1909. To the right is the Band rotunda, situated in the centre of The Square.

 
A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

the building at centre is the Chief Post Office of Palmerston North. It was completed and opened in 1906, on the site of the previous one, on the corner of Main Street and The Square. The building was later extended along Main Street, and the tower was removed after the 1942 Wairarapa earthquake, as it was considered unsafe. The clock and chimes were put into storage until reinstated in the Hopwood Clock Tower in The Square, which was completed in 1957. The Post Office building is now used as a restaurant and bar. The building on the left is "The Kosy" theatre.

 
A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

This photograph was taken from the tower of the Australasian Temperance and General Mutual Life Assurance Society Ltd (T&G) building, near the corner of Broadway Avenue and The Square. This partial view of the Square shows a number of its most recognisable monuments including: the Ladies Rest Rooms, built 1936; War Memorial, unveiled in 1926 to commemorate the casualties of WWI; the second band rotunda, built in 1907, but pulled down in 1956 to make way for the Hopwood Tower; All Saints Church, built 1914. Beyond can be seen the Tararua Mountains. Note that a long train is running through the Main Street line.

 
A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

This photograph of The Square was taken in the vicinity of the PDC building and looks towards the corner of Main Street West and The Square. The building in the centre is the third incarnation of the Commercial Hotel, built 1935. Next to it is the Commercial Building, still standing at 2015, and the DIC (Direct Importers Company). The DIC was constructed in 1927-1928 for CM Ross and Co Ltd. In 1959 CM Ross sold to Milne and Choyce, and in 1966 it was on-sold to the DIC. The DIC subsequently sold to Arthur Barnett in 1989. After closing as a department store in 1991 the building was acquired by the PNCC who extensively redesigned it as the Palmerston North City Library, opening 1996. It is a listed heritage building. The single-storey building opposite, in The Square, is the Rangitane Pavilion, a series of prefabricated buildings that sat opposite Main Street and the Commercial Hotel. The Rangitāne Pavilion was a meeting hall used by the community. When the City Council building were constructed, a room under the Council Chambers was incorporated for community use. It was closed in the mid 1980s.

 
A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

This is a photograph of the Square, oriented towards the portion of the Square between Main Street West and Church Street West. The buildings, from left are: Provincial Hotel (burned down in 1906 and was replaced by the Grand Hotel, now the Grand Cafe and Bar), Daily Times, J Mortensen (watchmaker and jeweller), R Hannah Boot, W Park (bookseller), R Leary (chemist), Leary and Dixon ('The Home of Music') and an unidentified building that was once J Linton's Land Office. The original band rotunda is the prominent feature on the right side of this photograph. On the left is a sign which reads, "Please Keep Off The Grass".

 
A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

A View of Te Marae o Hine / The Square

This photograph of The Square was probably taken from one of the top storeys of the CM Ross Building (Roscos Department Store) and showcases some of the changes that have taken place in The Square since the 1940s. Note the lack of the Hopwood Clock Tower (built 1957) and the presence of a large band rotunda in its place. This band rotunda was constructed in 1907 and demolished in 1956 during the construction of the clock tower. The train line that once ran through The Square can be seen behind the War Memorial (built 1926). The rail tracks were removed after the completion of the Milson Deviation made them redundant in 1959. Even the vegetation in The Square is markedly different - notice the native cabbage trees that grace it's lawns. One consistency is the marble statue of Te Peeti Te Awe Awe in the quadrant of The Square near to Church Street East. Built in 1907, this statue still stands in the same location today.

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