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Interior of the Rangiatea Maori Church, Otaki

Interior of the Rangiatea Maori Church, Otaki

Rangiātea Church in Otaki, New Zealand was the oldest Māori Anglican church in New Zealand. In 1848, Te Rauparaha who had just returned to Otaki from Australia, issued the challenge of building the church to the chief of Te Wehiwehi, who accepted. It was built under the direction of Te Rauparaha and English missionary Octavius Hadfield. During the original construction large tōtara logs had to be floated down rivers at nearby Ohau and Waikawa. The logs became the ridge pole and the central pillars of the church. The rafters, pillars and slabs were also made from tōtara. The design of the church is unique in that it incorporates ideas from both English and Māori church design. Completed in 1851, the building was burnt down by an arsonist in 1995, and by 2003 the church had been completely rebuilt. Also see 2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008505 and 2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008507

 
Page 1: Interior of the Rangiatea Maori Church, Otaki

Interior of the Rangiatea Maori Church, Otaki

Rangiātea Church in Otaki, New Zealand was the oldest Māori Anglican church in New Zealand. In 1848, Te Rauparaha who had just returned to Otaki from Australia, issued the challenge of building the church to the chief of Te Wehiwehi, who accepted. It was built under the direction of Te Rauparaha and English missionary Octavius Hadfield. During the original construction large tōtara logs had to be floated down rivers at nearby Ohau and Waikawa. The logs became the ridge pole and the central pillars of the church. The rafters, pillars and slabs were also made from tōtara. The design of the church is unique in that it incorporates ideas from both English and Māori church design. Completed in 1851, the building was burnt down by an arsonist in 1995, and by 2003 the church had been completely rebuilt.2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008505 and 2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008506

 
Page 1: Rangiātea Maori Church, Otaki

Rangiātea Maori Church, Otaki

Rangiātea Church in Otaki, New Zealand was the oldest Māori Anglican church in New Zealand. In 1848, Te Rauparaha who had just returned to Otaki from Australia, issued the challenge of building the church to the chief of Te Wehiwehi, who accepted. It was built under the direction of Te Rauparaha and English missionary Octavius Hadfield. During the original construction large tōtara logs had to be floated down rivers at nearby Ohau and Waikawa. The logs became the ridge pole and the central pillars of the church. The rafters, pillars and slabs were also made from tōtara. The design of the church is unique in that it incorporates ideas from both English and Māori church design. Completed in 1851, the building was burnt down by an arsonist in 1995, and by 2003 the church had been completely rebuilt. Also see 2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008506 and 2014P_IMCA-DigitalMaster_008507.

 
Taonui Street - Winstone Ltd

Taonui Street - Winstone Ltd

Winstone Ltd was established in Palmerston North around 1930 as a supplier of building materials. It later expanded to sub-contracting and tile making. The office and showroom was added to the existing building in Lombard Street c 1963.

 
Women working on Farm During World War II, Palmerston North

Women working on Farm During World War II, Palmerston North

After work, this group of women went haymaking at the Fitzherbert property in Ihaka Street, Palmerston North, as part of the war effort. From left: Unknown; Eileen Redwood, worked at the Bank of New Zealand (later Mrs Kingston); Rona Fenwick(?), worked at the Palmerston North City Council (later Mrs Jim McDavitt); Mrs Spike Moore, her husband worked for an oil company; June Allen, worked for Johnston and Co, King Street, grocery and wine/spirits wholesalers (later Mrs Blennerhassett); Edna Spillman, worked at Johnston and Co (later Mrs Quarrie).

 
Page 1: Aerial View of the Square and Main Street East
Page 2: Aerial View of the Square and Main Street East

Aerial View of the Square and Main Street East

Running from the top of The Square to the top right hand corner is Rangitikei Street, and Church Street East runs from the bottom right corner to The Square. Through the centre of The Square can be seen the railway line, which ran down Main Street, on both sides of The Square, until it closed in 1964. The slight bend in the rail line in The Square, as seen, was paid for by the Palmerston North Borough Council to accommodate the war memorial in the centre (indistinct), when it built in 1926. The Hopwood clock tower, erected 1957, can be seen without its permanent cross (not added until 1981). Distinctly can be seen the four quadrants and the centre strip, divided by the roads which ran into The Square for a long period of time. Today (2014) The Square has returned to its original one block of land.

 
Children Play in the Lakelet

Children Play in the Lakelet

This photograph looks towards the corner of Fitzherbert Avenue and The Square. In the middle of the image, children can be seen playing in the Lakelet. It was the main feature of the last quadrant of The Square to be developed by the Beautifying Society. James Nash, Mayor of Palmerston North, opened The Lakelet on 27 October 1909. It is shaped as a butterfly, with the wings being bisected by a bridge as its body. It is also referred to as the Butterfly Lake. The building in the background is the old Palmerston North Municipal Library.

 
Coronation Fountain, The Square

Coronation Fountain, The Square

This photographs shows the King Edward VII Coronation Fountain in The Square. The Coronation Fountain was built in 1904, in the middle of The Square but was shifted to this location in 1926, to allow the Cenotaph to take the central focus. It was again shifted in 2005 to another part of The Square. Also visible are the Hopwood Clock Tower and the War Memorial.

 
The Centennial Convention Centre, Main Street

The Centennial Convention Centre, Main Street

The Centennial Convention Centre, the third and final stage of the Civic Centre, was officially opened on Sunday September 28, 1980. The centre was designed to hold conferences, exhibitions and social events. The ground floor has the exhibition hall, foyer, social gallery and kitchen facilities. On the first floor is the convention hall, gallery, bar, and food preparation areas. Both areas can double as conference areas and operate independently at the same time, catering for up to 1000 people. This view shows the centre from the Piazza, between the Civic Administration building and the Convention Centre. the entrance to the Convention Centre has now been renovated. the corner of George Street can be seen in the foreground, opposite the Convention Centre.

 
The Manawatu Catchment Board office, 541 Ruahine Street

The Manawatu Catchment Board office, 541 Ruahine Street

The Manawatu Catchment Board was the first to be formed in New Zealand. In 1987 the Board amalgamated with the Rangitikei Wanganui Catchment Board to form the Central Districts Catchment Board, though it continued to officially exist until 1989 when it amalgamated with a number of other authorities to form the Manawatu Wanganui Regional Council.

 
A F Martin Ltd, Main Street

A F Martin Ltd, Main Street

This photograph was taken on the section of Main Street between Victoria and Albert Street. Martins were engineers, grinders and gear cutters. They also erected and repaired machinery, made concrete posts and manufactured 'Martins Concrete Mixers' and woodworking machinery (Wises Directory 1953).

 
Bus Depot, Church Street

Bus Depot, Church Street

The Palmerston North Bus Terminal was opened 10 January 1977, replacing the old bus terminal on the Square. It was situated on Church Street East and cost $50,000 to build. The site is now incorporated into 'The Plaza' in Palmerston North.

 
Coleman Mall, Palmerston North

Coleman Mall, Palmerston North

These buildings sit on the corner of Coleman Mall and The Square.  From left - [obscured by tree] two storey building, 19-21 Coleman Place, two storey building 23-25 Coleman Place, one storey building, 165 The Square.

 
T & G Building, Broadway Avenue

T & G Building, Broadway Avenue

The Australasian Temperance and General Mutual Life Assurance Society Ltd (T&G) building in Palmerston North was designed by A and K Henderson in the distinctive 'house' style developed by the firm and constructed in 1938. In front is the building of Australia and New Zealand Bank Limited (ANZ).

Creator
Date
August 1963
Place
Corner of Broadway and the Square, Palmerston North
 
Sir Geoffrey Peren Building, Massey University Palmerston North Campus

Sir Geoffrey Peren Building, Massey University Palmerston North Campus

The Sir Geoffrey Peren Building (named for the first principal of Massey Agricultural College, previously known as the Old Main Building) was designed by Roy A. Lippincott in the Spanish Mission / Mission Revival style. It was built by Fletcher Construction, with its foundation stone laid in 1929 and opening in 1931. As the main building of Massey Agricultural College it housed lecture rooms, teaching and research laboratories, a library, assembly hall, students' common room and staff studies. It is now used for offices, teaching and research.

 
Wharerata, Massey University Palmerston North Campus

Wharerata, Massey University Palmerston North Campus

"Whare Rata", was built in Fitzherbert in 1901, for Arthur Edward Russell, a retired farmer of Manawatu. The name means "The House of Redbeard", after Mr Rusell. The Government purchased the property in 1951, after Mrs Ethel Russell's death, and it became one of Massey Agricultural College's lecture theatres. Today "Whare Rata" (now spelt "Wharerata") is used by Massey University as a Staff and Function Centre.

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