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192 Broadway Avenue

192 Broadway Avenue

The house at 192 Broadway Avenue was built by W H Cook, one of the two Cook brothers who opened a saw milling operation during the late 19th Century. William Cook died on the 13 October 1902. The house was occupied by various members of the family until 1970. At this time surrounding grounds were bulldozed to make way for offices and shops, and by 1998 the house was the legal offices of Wadham Goodman, Barristers and Solicitors.

 
Hoffman brick kiln, Featherston Street

Hoffman brick kiln, Featherston Street

This Hoffman oblong continuous kiln in Palmerston North has not been used since 1959. It is one of the few left in New Zealand and thought to be the only one still in the North Island. It is listed in category 1 under the Historic Places Act 1993. Brick and Pipes Limited, formed 1919, took over this Hoffman kiln from Mr R D Edwards, and in 1929 amalgamated with two other brickmakers, Mr W Mouldey and Trevor Bros. In 1983, Brick and Pipes Ltd ceased trading.

 
314 Church Street

314 Church Street

the house was designed by Reginald Thorrold Jaggard, and built in 1928 for Mrs H R Waldegrave. The house was a residence until 1984 when it was converted into commercial premises. 314 Church Street is listed in Category 4 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for its architectural significance.

 
312 Church Street

312 Church Street

The house was designed by A R Allen, and built in 1930 for Henry Free, general manager and shareholder in C M Ross Co. Ltd department store. Free was also a Councillor 1931-1935. It was later owned by John Young, an optometrist, Athol Preece 1951-1969 and the Lutheran Church, for use as their manse. It was also used as Da Mario Restaurant and is now architectural offices and an upstairs flat. 312 Church Street is listed in category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for its architectural significance.

 
All Saints Church hall, Church Street

All Saints Church hall, Church Street

The wooden church hall was originally built as the All Saints Church in 1881 by Meyrick, Perrin and Oakley and was dedicated by Bishop Hadfield on 16 February 1882. It replaced the first Anglican church, built on the site in 1875, which was incorporated into this building. The church was enlarged in 1891 and in 1901, and the bell tower removed between 1904 and 1910 because the wood was rotten. In 1910 the church was moved back and placed sideways on the section to make room for a new All Saints to be built. The old church was then used as a hall and Sunday school until 2007 when it was destroyed by arson.

 
Royal Hotel, Rangitikei Street

Royal Hotel, Rangitikei Street

The Royal Hotel began life as Dawick’s Buffet, an unlicensed boarding house and restaurant in the 1890’s established by Samuel Dawick. In 1913 the licence of the Royal Hotel on the corner of The Square and Rangitikei Street was transferred to Dawick’s and it became known as the “New Royal Hotel”, run by George Lvoni. The Royal Hotel was granted a tavern licence in 1971 and was known as the Royal Tavern. The Royal Tavern is listed in category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register because of its historical, architectural and community significance.

 
748 Main Street

748 Main Street

The dwelling at 748 Main Street was built around 1887 and distinguishing features of the house were the twin gables at the front. An early owner of the house was T R Moore, later residing at Waimaramara, followed by Mrs. Coutts and family, after their house next door was destroyed by fire.

 
Caccia Birch House front entrance

Caccia Birch House front entrance

Caccia Birch, as it is known today, was designed by L G West and built for Jacob Nannestad, a sawmiller, in about 1892. After being sold to Jack Strang in 1903 the house was extensively enlarged, both by him and by the New Zealand Government during the time it was leased to them for use as Government House 1908-1910. In 1921 the house was sold to William Caccia Birch. After Caccia Birch's death it was gifted to the NZ Government, in 1941, and was variously used by the army in WWII, as a convalescent home for nurses, and by both Victoria and Massey Universities. The house has been owned by Palmerston North City Council since 1984 and has been restored and renovated as a conference and function centre. It is a Category 1 listed building with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust because of its historical and architectural and community significance. At the time of this photograph the home was in a state of disrepair.

 
Premier Drapery Company Fabric Shop, Church Street

Premier Drapery Company Fabric Shop, Church Street

The Premier Drapery Company was one of the foremost department stores in Palmerston North. This building, designed by L G West and built in 1905 as part of the former Club Hotel complex, was bought by the PDC in 1975, with a view to building a new complex. This building was not demolished but is now connected to the Plaza shopping mall. It is currently occupied by Pumpkin Patch (2009).

 
16 Guy Avenue

16 Guy Avenue

This two storey house was built for Joseph Beale in 1893. It was then sold to Andrew Guy in 1899. Guy was a member of a prominent family in Buteshire, Scotland and became a well-known solicitorand founder of the legal firm now known as Cooper, Rapley, Bennett and Thomson. Originally the property included ten acres of land with a frontage on Rangitikei Street. After Guy’s death his widow, Ellen, began subdivision in 1938, leading to the formation of Guy Avenue. The house was sold in the same year to Elizabeth Jane Duncan, transferred to John Henry Duncan in 1950, sold to Clarence Hunt in 1954 and to Ivan Moel Elliott in 1977. The house is listed in category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for architectural significance. Photograph taken from Guy Avenue

 
Court House, Main Street

Court House, Main Street

This concrete building constructed in 1897 became the fourth Court House in Palmerston North, ans with additions and alterations remained in use until the 1980s. The building was listed in category four of the Historic Palaces Trust because of its architectural significance but it was demolished when a new Court House, completed in 1988, was constructed on the same site.

 
Staircase at 16 Guy Avenue

Staircase at 16 Guy Avenue

This two storey house was built for Joseph Beale in 1893. It was then sold to Andrew Guy in 1899. Guy was a member of a prominent family in Buteshire, Scotland and became a well-known solicitorand founder of the legal firm now known as Cooper, Rapley, Bennett and Thomson. Originally the property included ten acres of land with a frontage on Rangitikei Street. After Guy’s death his widow, Ellen, began subdivision in 1938, leading to the formation of Guy Avenue. The house was sold in the same year to Elizabeth Jane Duncan, transferred to John Henry Duncan in 1950, sold to Clarence Hunt in 1954 and to Ivan Moel Elliott in 1977. The house is listed in category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for architectural significance.

 
56 Brightwater Terrace

56 Brightwater Terrace

This house at 56 Brightwater Terrace was built in 1880. The house is notable as an atypical example of the architecture of the early 1880s. The building is noted in Category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register because of its architectural significance. The house had $16,000 worth of restoration done in 1979 by the then owner.

 
Hoffman brick kiln, Fetherston Street

Hoffman brick kiln, Fetherston Street

One of the 14 entrances or wickets which divides the brick kiln into chambers, each capable of holding 10,000 bricks.This Hoffman oblong continuous kiln in Palmerston North has not been used since 1959. It is one of the few left in New Zealand and thought to be the only one still in the North Island. It is listed in category 1 under the Historic Places Act 1993. Brick and Pipes Limited, formed 1919, took over this Hoffman kiln from Mr R D Edwards, and in 1929 amalgamated with two other brickmakers, Mr W Mouldey and Trevor Bros. In 1983, Brick and Pipes Ltd ceased trading.

 
217 Grey Street

217 Grey Street

This house was built by a German settler Johan Ax c 1876. Ax worked around the region including the Manawatu Gorge railway line and the Taonui sawmill. Upon his death in 1934, Ax gave the house to his widowed daughter, May Freeman, who stayed there with her son, Sefton Freeman (who worked at the radio station 2ZA), until the house was sold in 1968. It is believed the house is the oldest in Palmerston North on its original site and one of the oldest to still have an outside toilet. The building was listed in category 3 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register because of architectural significance, but no longer exists.

 
Interior of Hoffman brick kiln, Featherston Street

Interior of Hoffman brick kiln, Featherston Street

One of the 14 entrances or wickets which divides the brick kiln into chambers, each capable of holding 10,000 bricks. This Hoffman oblong continuous kiln in Palmerston North has not been used since 1959. It is one of the few left in New Zealand and thought to be the only one still in the North Island. It is listed in category 1 under the Historic Places Act 1993. Brick and Pipes Limited, formed 1919, took over this Hoffman kiln from Mr R D Edwards, and in 1929 amalgamated with two other brickmakers, Mr W Mouldey and Trevor Bros. In 1983, Brick and Pipes Ltd ceased trading.

 
Grand Hotel, corner of The Square and Church Street

Grand Hotel, corner of The Square and Church Street

The Grand hotel was constructed in 1906, with the original plans showing 66 bedrooms, 2 conservatories, one shop facing the square and a large dining room. It was designed by NZ architect Mr Maddison and built by Mr James Trevor (Trevor Bros). The tower was later removed as an earthquake risk. The Duke and Duchess of York stayed during their 1927 tour of NZ as did Queen Elizabeth II during her 1952 tour. It is now largely used as business offices, with a bar and cafe on the Ground Floor. It is listed in category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register because of its historic and community significance.

 
Interior of Caccia Birch House, 130 Te Awe Awe Street

Interior of Caccia Birch House, 130 Te Awe Awe Street

Caccia Birch, as it is known today, was designed by L G West and built for Jacob Nannestad, a sawmiller, in about 1892. After being sold to Jack Strang in 1903 the house was extensively enlarged, both by him and by the New Zealand Government during the time it was leased to them for use as Government House 1908-1910. In 1921 the house was sold to William Caccia Birch. After Caccia Birch's death it was gifted to the NZ Government, in 1941, and was variously used by the army in WWII, as a convalescent home for nurses, and by both Victoria and Massey Universities. The house has been owned by Palmerston North City Council since 1984 and has been restored and renovated as a conference and function centre. It is a Category 1 listed building with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust because of its historical and architectural and community significance. At the time of this photograph the home was in a state of disrepair. It shows the kauri panelling and fire place in a downstairs room.

 
578 Featherston Street "Norton Park"

578 Featherston Street "Norton Park"

Sir Matthew Oram, MP for Manawatu (1943 – 1957) and Speaker of the House of Representatives (1950 – 1957), named the house after family connections to a village in Durham, England. One of Norton’s early residents was Richard Leary who came to Palmerston North in 1875 and established the town’s first pharmacy. After Leary’s death in 1901, Norton was bought by the Thornely family. The house was renamed Norton Park and housed a men and women’s club of that name. In later years it was owned by the New Life Centre Church. This building is listed in Category 4 of the Historic Palaces Trust because of historical and Architectural significance.

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