Found 91 results

Narrow search resultsHideFilters

 
'Rangimaire', 3 Rangiora Avenue

'Rangimaire', 3 Rangiora Avenue

‘Rangi Marie” (or Rangimarie) was built for C.M. Ross the founder of C M Ross and Company in 1908. Originally it stood on extensive grounds on a rise in the Terrace End area, but the land was subdivided 1939-1940. The area was then developed for state housing, and thehouse is now surrounded by homes. When first subdivided the area was known at the Ross Block but was later renamed as Roslyn. The symmetrical front of the house has two large reception rooms either side of the front porch. The house still has many of the original fireplaces and surrounds. This building is listed in Category 4 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for architectural significance.

 
Hall archway at 'Waimarama', 46 Alfred Street

Hall archway at 'Waimarama', 46 Alfred Street

This house was built 1905 - 1906 for Elizabeth and James Alfred Nash. Nash was both a Mayor and MP for Palmerston North. In 1914 it was sold to T R Moore who named it 'Waimarama'. The house covers 5000 square feet, is built of rimu and kauri and has a 14 foot stud. The panelling in the entrance hall and in the billiard room is rimu. It was designed by Ernest Larcombe and is listed in category 1 of the Historical Places Trust because of historical and architectural significance.

 
Fireplace detail at 'Waimarama', 46 Alfred Street

Fireplace detail at 'Waimarama', 46 Alfred Street

This house was built 1905 - 1906 for Elizabeth and James Alfred Nash. Nash was both a Mayor and MP for Palmerston North. In 1914 it was sold to T R Moore who named it 'Waimarama'. The house covers 5000 square feet, is built of rimu and kauri and has a 14 foot stud. The panelling in the entrance hall and in the billiard room is rimu. It was designed by Ernest Larcombe and is listed in category 1 of the Historical Places Trust because of historical and architectural significance.

 
Front entrance of 16 Guy Avenue

Front entrance of 16 Guy Avenue

This two storey house was built for Joseph Beale in 1893. It was then sold to Andrew Guy in 1899. Guy was a member of a prominent family in Buteshire, Scotland and became a well-known solicitorand founder of the legal firm now known as Cooper, Rapley, Bennett and Thomson. Originally the property included ten acres of land with a frontage on Rangitikei Street. After Guy’s death his widow, Ellen, began subdivision in 1938, leading to the formation of Guy Avenue. The house was sold in the same year to Elizabeth Jane Duncan, transferred to John Henry Duncan in 1950, sold to Clarence Hunt in 1954 and to Ivan Moel Elliott in 1977. The house is listed in category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for architectural significance.

 
Bay window of 16 Guy Avenue

Bay window of 16 Guy Avenue

This two storey house was built for Joseph Beale in 1893. It was then sold to Andrew Guy in 1899. Guy was a member of a prominent family in Buteshire, Scotland and became a well-known solicitorand founder of the legal firm now known as Cooper, Rapley, Bennett and Thomson. Originally the property included ten acres of land with a frontage on Rangitikei Street. After Guy’s death his widow, Ellen, began subdivision in 1938, leading to the formation of Guy Avenue. The house was sold in the same year to Elizabeth Jane Duncan, transferred to John Henry Duncan in 1950, sold to Clarence Hunt in 1954 and to Ivan Moel Elliott in 1977. The house is listed in category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for architectural significance.

 
Front entrance to 16 Guy Avenue

Front entrance to 16 Guy Avenue

This two storey house was built for Joseph Beale in 1893. It was then sold to Andrew Guy in 1899. Guy was a member of a prominent family in Buteshire, Scotland and became a well-known solicitorand founder of the legal firm now known as Cooper, Rapley, Bennett and Thomson. Originally the property included ten acres of land with a frontage on Rangitikei Street. After Guy’s death his widow, Ellen, began subdivision in 1938, leading to the formation of Guy Avenue. The house was sold in the same year to Elizabeth Jane Duncan, transferred to John Henry Duncan in 1950, sold to Clarence Hunt in 1954 and to Ivan Moel Elliott in 1977. The house is listed in category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for architectural significance.

 
495 Church Street

495 Church Street

This two storey house is now divided into flats for rent. As an example of an early residence of Palmerston North house, this house is listed in category 4 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for architectural significance.

 
312 Church Street

312 Church Street

The house was designed by A R Allen, and built in 1930 for Henry Free, general manager and shareholder in C M Ross Co. Ltd department store. Free was also a Councillor 1931-1935. It was later owned by John Young, an optometrist, Athol Preece 1951-1969 and the Lutheran Church, for use as their manse. It was also used as Da Mario Restaurant and is now architectural offices and an upstairs flat. 312 Church Street is listed in category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for its architectural significance.

 
Bay window of 748 Main Street

Bay window of 748 Main Street

748 Main Street was built around 1887 with the distinguishing features of twin gables at the front. T R Moore was an early owner, followed by the Coutts family. The house was mostly built of totara and the flooring is tongue and groove in heart totara. The house, near the Ruahine Street corner, no longer exists at this address (2010).

 
Front porch of 748 Main Street

Front porch of 748 Main Street

748 Main Street was built around 1887 with the distinguishing features of twin gables at the front. T R Moore was an early owner, followed by the Coutts family. The house was mostly built of totara and the flooring is tongue and groove in heart totara. The house, near the Ruahine Street corner, no longer exists at this address (2010).

 
'Miranui', 148 Russell Street

'Miranui', 148 Russell Street

Miranui, one of Palmerston North's Edwardian homesteads, was built for Alfred Seifert, one of six brothers who were involved in the flaxdressing industry. The homestead was completed in late 1906. It is listed in Category 4 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for architectural significance.

 
Coal range, 451 College Street

Coal range, 451 College Street

This house was built in 1902 by Lawrence Laurenson for his family. The Laurenson family continued to occupy it at least until the 1980s. The Laurenson family emigrated from the Shetland Islands arriving on the ‘Avalanche’ in 1875. This building is listed in category 2 of the New Zealand Historic Places Trust register, for architectural significance.

 
Recreated living room in 'Totaranui'

Recreated living room in 'Totaranui'

'Totaranui' was built in Fitzroy Street by Peter Manson, a sawmiller, c1875. It is one of the oldest remaining houses in Palmerston North. It was built of locally milled totara and was named 'Totara-nui', meaning large totara, by Manson. It remained the home of the Manson family until about 1903, during which time it was enlarged, and was then used as a rental house until bought by William Pascoe in 1908. The Pascoe family lived in the house until donating it to the city in 1970. Restoration was then undertaken by the Historical Committee of the Palmerston North Centennial Association, and the house now resides as part of the Te Manawa complex.

 
Kitchen range in 'Totaranui'

Kitchen range in 'Totaranui'

'Totaranui' was built in Fitzroy Street by Peter Manson, a sawmiller, c1875. It is one of the oldest remaining houses in Palmerston North. It was built of locally milled totara and was named 'Totara-nui', meaning large totara, by Manson. It remained the home of the Manson family until about 1903, during which time it was enlarged, and was then used as a rental house until bought by William Pascoe in 1908. The Pascoe family lived in the house until donating it to the city in 1970. Restoration was then undertaken by the Historical Committee of the Palmerston North Centennial Association, and the house now resides as part of the Te Manawa complex.

 
Caccia Birch House from the side, 130 Te Awe Awe Street

Caccia Birch House from the side, 130 Te Awe Awe Street

Caccia Birch, as it is known today, was designed by L G West and built for Jacob Nannestad, a sawmiller, in about 1892. After being sold to Jack Strang in 1903 the house was extensively enlarged, both by him and by the New Zealand Government during the time it was leased to them for use as Government House 1908-1910. In 1921 the house was sold to William Caccia Birch. After Caccia Birch's death it was gifted to the NZ Government, in 1941, and was variously used by the army in WWII, as a convalescent home for nurses, and by both Victoria and Massey Universities. The house has been owned by Palmerston North City Council since 1984 and has been restored and renovated as a conference and function centre. It is a Category 1 listed building with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust because of its historical and architectural and community significance. At the time of this photograph the home was in a state of disrepair.

 
Caccia Birch House, 130 Te Awe Awe Street

Caccia Birch House, 130 Te Awe Awe Street

Caccia Birch, as it is known today, was designed by L G West and built for Jacob Nannestad, a sawmiller, in about 1892. After being sold to Jack Strang in 1903 the house was extensively enlarged, both by him and by the New Zealand Government during the time it was leased to them for use as Government House 1908-1910. In 1921 the house was sold to William Caccia Birch. After Caccia Birch's death it was gifted to the NZ Government, in 1941, and was variously used by the army in WWII, as a convalescent home for nurses, and by both Victoria and Massey Universities. The house has been owned by Palmerston North City Council since 1984 and has been restored and renovated as a conference and function centre. It is a Category 1 listed building with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust because of its historical and architectural and community significance. At the time of this photograph the home was in a state of disrepair.

 
Court House, Main Street

Court House, Main Street

This concrete building constructed in 1897 became the fourth Court House in Palmerston North, ans with additions and alterations remained in use until the 1980s. The building was listed in category four of the Historic Palaces Trust because of its architectural significance but it was demolished when a new Court House, completed in 1988, was constructed on the same site.

 
Former Returned Servicemens Club, corner of George Street and Cuba Street

Former Returned Servicemens Club, corner of George Street and Cuba Street

The clubrooms were built by the Patriotic Society in 1917 for use as a social club for returned servicemen. In 1918 it was named the "Soldiers Club". By 1929 the ground floor had been remodeled for shops, while the second floor remained the RSA Club rooms until 1966 when they moved to Broadway. This photograph shows what was originally the upstairs balcony. Early on it was glassed in .

 
Former Returned Servicemen's Clubrooms, corner of Cuba Street and George Street

Former Returned Servicemen's Clubrooms, corner of Cuba Street and George Street

The clubrooms were built by the Patriotic Society in 1917 for use as a social club for returned servicemen. In 1918 it was named the "Soldiers Club". By 1929 the ground floor had been remodelled for shops, while the second floor remained the RSA Club rooms until 1966 when they moved to Broadway. This photograph shows an internal archway at the top of the stairway, on the first floor.

 
Ex Returned Servicemen's Clubrooms, Corner of George Street and Cuba Street

Ex Returned Servicemen's Clubrooms, Corner of George Street and Cuba Street

The clubrooms were built by the Patriotic Society in 1917 for use as a social club for returned servicemen. In 1918 it was named the "Soldiers Club". By 1929 the ground floor had been remodelled for shops, while the second floor remained the RSA Club rooms until 1966 when they moved to Broadway. This photograph shows detail of the wooden staircase.

 
Former Returned Servicemen's Clubrooms, corner of Cuba Street and George Street

Former Returned Servicemen's Clubrooms, corner of Cuba Street and George Street

The clubrooms were built by the Patriotic Society in 1917 for use as a social club for returned servicemen. In 1918 it was named the "Soldiers Club". By 1929 the ground floor had been remodelled for shops, while the second floor remained the RSA Club rooms until 1966 when they moved to Broadway. This photograph shows one of the leadlight windows still existent in the building.

 
Haseldens' Hobbies and Cycle shop, 75-77 The Square

Haseldens' Hobbies and Cycle shop, 75-77 The Square

This building was constructed in 1890 for the 'Manawatu Daily Times', and was occupied by them until 1913. It was Waghorn's decorating shop 1913 - 1939, and then Tingey's “Oil and Colour Merchants” 1939-1979. In 1979 it became Haseldens Hobbies and Cycle shop, from 1979. The building was demolished in 2008. The Grand Hotel can be seen beside it.

Load Items 31 to NaN