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Letter home from Pat Argyle

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Pat (Percival) Argyle (1890-1915) was the son of Henry and Alice Argyle of Bunnythorpe. At the time of this letter he was working as a labourer on the rail line near Ohakune. This letter is to one of his brothers, Len, and tells of his work.

Pat and Len enlisted and served in World War One together. They both died at Chunuk Bair in 1915.

Identification

Object type
Multi-Page Document
Digitisation ID
2019P_2019-25_026435
Title
Letter home from Pat Argyle
Relation
CA: Argyle Family
Format
Paper
Held In
Community Archives
Archive
Argyle Family

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Creation

Created By
Place
Oahkune area
Date
July 21, 1907

Object rights

Credit Line
Ian Matheson City Archives

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Ohakune
July 21th, 1907
Dear Len,
I received your’s and mum’s letters the other day and I was very glad to hear from you. Your letter was a long time reaching here but there is no regular mail and I have to ask anybody going to Ohakune to bring up my letters. The weather is very bad up here at present. We have snow every week sometimes a foot deep

(p.2)
I am working in a cutting now on the line about eight miles this side of the big viaduct at Makatohe. There are five men working in the cutting besides myself. We are getting eighteen pence a yard and we send out 35 yards a day. The roads are very bad here. We were bringing a hand cart to the cutting and I got stuck in the mud over my knees and one of my mates had to help me out. There is a terrible lot of rats here and

(p.3)
I often wish I had old Kaipo up here. They keep me awake at nights running over my bunk. There is plenty of pigeons in the bush up here and kakas and parakeets. Well Len I can’t write any more at present so I will close now with love to all. Hoping Hector is getting on allright and remember me to him you know so that he won’t forget me.
I remain
Your loving brother
Pat.

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