E 3 ngā putanga i kitea

Whakawhāitihia ngā putangaHunaiaWhakaaturia

 
Evans Family Collection: Mr Evans and sons at Massey Agricultural College farm

Evans Family Collection: Mr Evans and sons at Massey Agricultural College farm

A photographic series prepared by the Prime Minister’s Department in 1947 to attract British migrants. The Evans family of 5 Mansford Place, Palmerston North were selected to show the living conditions of a typical New Zealand family. Jack Evans and sons, John and Michael, are examining a sheep at one of the Massey Agricultural College farms with the assistance of a staff member. The College was founded in 1928 and offered degrees in agricultural science and short courses on farm technology and management. By the 1940s it was noted for its major contribution to the development of New Zealand’s sheep and dairy industries and the photograph was probably included to promote careers in the farming sector.

 
Savage Crescent state housing precinct

Savage Crescent state housing precinct

A copy of an original plan by R B Hammond (town planner and housing consultant for the Department of Housing) for the Savage Crescent state housing precinct, showing house design numbers. Savage Crescent is in the West End area of Palmerston North, bounded by College Street, Cook Street and Park Road. Fifty acres was bought by the Government for the development, and between then and 1944, 245 state houses were built. For the time, Savage Crescent was designed upon the most modern ideas, as a garden suburb, with a large central, recreational area, communal garages and a variety of house designs built for the sun and with ample gardens. While the majority of the houses in Savage Crescent are now privately owned, the precinct remains as a significant example of state housing in New Zealand.

 
Savage Crescent Conservation Area, a garden suburb

Savage Crescent Conservation Area, a garden suburb

Photographed from 86 Savage Crescent, home of Mrs Beryl Walker from 1939-1994, shows houses 80 Savage Crescent (far left), 85 Savage Crescent (centre) and 87 Savage Cresent (right). Savage Crescent, a state housing area, which was designed on the principles of the garden suburb. The low nib walls marking the street frontages combined with trees planted on the verges were intended to create the appearance of a large community garden. After seventy years parts of the inner streets retain this aspect. this photograph is part of the series but is a good illustration of the garden suburb of the time.