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"Winners of the Rosenbrook Basketball Trophy"

"Winners of the Rosenbrook Basketball Trophy"

This image was not published in the Manawatu Evening Standard. Photograph believed to have been taken outside Palmerston North Intermediate School (later Palmerston North Intermediate Normal School). [Joyce Rosenbrook presents winning team of eight women the Rosenbrook Basketball Trophy].

Creator
 
"Pleased With His Win"

"Pleased With His Win"

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 29 February, 1964. "M. Miers of Albion Club at the Palmerston North Boys' High School looks pleased after his win during the school swimming championships held yesterday. Winning the 100 yards backstroke in a time of 1.26.4 made him the junior champion."

The event was actually held at the Queen Elizabeth Technical College swimming pool, as their pool was 33 1/3 yards in length, while the Palmerston North Boys' High School pool was only 25 yards.

Creator
 
"Rugby Manawatu vs. Wellington"

"Rugby Manawatu vs. Wellington"

This image was taken by a Manawatu Evening Standard photographer and is held in the Manawatū Evening Standard Negative Collection, but appears not to have run in the newspaper itself.

The game was played on June 5th, 1961 (Queens Birthday weekend). The result was a win to Wellington by 27-19. In this photo Nev McEwan leads out Wellington, followed by Brian Frederikson, while Bevan Jones leads out Manawatū.

Creator
Place
The Showgrounds, Palmerston North
 
"Rugby Manawatu vs. Wellington"

"Rugby Manawatu vs. Wellington"

This image was taken by a Manawatu Evening Standard photographer and is held in the Manawatū Evening Standard Negative Collection, but appears not to have run in the newspaper itself.

The game was played on June 5th, 1961 (Queens Birthday weekend). The result was a win to Wellington by 27-19. In this photo, Don McCaskie (with Gerald Nesdale close at hand) has Ralph Caulton and Barry Cull looking to make a tackle. Other notable names for Manawatū on the day were Stu Freebairn, Jimmy Nichols, Kevin Wing, Murray Ball, Jimmy Taitoko, Nev Mears, Bill Hounsell and Sam Knight; and for Wellington, John Millar, Rod Heeps, Neil Wolfe, Ron Horsley, and Colin Currie. The referee was Frank Parkinson.

Wellington scored 7 tries (x 3 points ) from Millar (2), Wolfe, Cull, Currie, Bendle, and Heeps, with 3 conversions by Brian Frederikson, for their 27 points. For Manawatū there were tries by Wing and Freebairn, with 3 penalties by the fullback Cowan who later left the field with an injury, at which point Gary Hermansson took over the goal kicking and converted the two tries, to make up the 19 points. What was particularly special for Hermansson was that most of the Wellington players that day became his teammates some two seasons later when he started playing for the Wellington team.

Creator
Place
The Showgrounds, Palmerston North
 
"Brigadier G.P. Cade, D.S.O., Makes Inspection" at Linton Camp

"Brigadier G.P. Cade, D.S.O., Makes Inspection" at Linton Camp

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 11 April 1961 "Brigadier G.P. Cade, D.S.O., accompanied by Lieutenant Grimsdale, Major E.C. Burgess and Major Bighouse inspecting troops at Linton Camp today. The parade was called to mark the presentation of long-service and good-conduct medals to W.O. II F.F. Dorrington, W.O. II H.A. Edwards and Staff-Sergeant G. Reid. They have completed 15 years of service."
Correction to Standard text: Major C. E. (Claude Ernest) Burgess, not E. C. Burgess.

Creator
Place
Linton Camp, Linton, Palmerston North
 
"Terrazzo (N.Z.) Ltd."

"Terrazzo (N.Z.) Ltd."

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 11 July, 1959. "Space heating has been gaining wide popularity in New Zealand in recent years and Terrazzo (N.Z.) Ltd., besides stocking the recognised makes, have qualified staff to carry out all installations. These heaters are displayed on the centre stand."

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"Latest Craze for Old and Young"

"Latest Craze for Old and Young"

[Photograph of a Jennifer Stowe (later Jennifer Robert Brookes), aged four, standing outside her parent's shop 'The Pram House', which was located next to the Manawatū Evening Standard building on Church Street.]

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"Duxes of City and District Schools" G. Leng-Ward, E. Dowling, J. Crowther, W. Goodyear

"Duxes of City and District Schools" G. Leng-Ward, E. Dowling, J. Crowther, W. Goodyear

[Photograph of Duxes of City and District Schools: G. Leng-Ward, E. Dowling, J. Crowther and W. Goodyear standing outside their school (Winchester School).]

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

Carved Posts Come Home [Pouwhenua]

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 4th August 1993. "The air was thick with emotion when four Rangitāne pouwhenua (carved stockade posts) were returned home yesterday after an absence of 60 years. Originally from Puketotara Pa, the pouwhenua were considered significant and important taonga for the Rangitāne people. They were the only large Rangitāne carvings still in New Zealand, and four of seven in existence. In 1933, Wiremu Kingi Te Awe Awe presented the carvings to the then Dominion Museum for safekeeping. There they were displayed in the Māori Hall for many years. Today, a delegation from the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa, led by board chairman Sir Hamish Hay and Māori art and history director Cliff Whiting, handed over the carvings on a permanent loan basis to the Manawatu Museum. They will form a major component of the exhibitions in the new Manawatu Museum - Science Centre, opening in February next year. Mr. Whiting said the decision to return the carvings to their area of origin was part of the New Zealand Museum's policy of partnership with other museums. [Pictured] One of the four Rangitāne pouwhenua, returned to the Manawatu yesterday, is unveiled in preparation for transportation to a wing of the Museum's new premises."

Creator
Place
Church Street, Palmerston North
 
[Beehive Jive]

[Beehive Jive]

The information for this image was taken from an advertisement that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 31st March 1989 "Hiku Artz Productions presents Darby Tuhaka and Beehive Jive Rhythm & Blues stageshow. Cloverlea Tavern, playing Friday & Saturday nights 7.30 pm. No cover charge."

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
Clansmen On Their Way to Expo

Clansmen On Their Way to Expo

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 19th August 1992 "The Tartan Clansmen left last week for Seville in Spain, where they will represent Palmerston North at World Expo 92. First stop is Disneyland where the band will perform for three days. The promoter in Los Angeles told the Clansmen they are the first "Down Under" group to be accepted at Disneyland. From there they move to London and on to Seville, where they arrive by September 10. The group was invited to perform at Seville by Expo co-ordinator Max Cryer, who had been impressed by their performance at Brisbane Expo in 1988. Unfortunately the Clansmen could not get a class A rating, which would have meant their tour would be funded by New Zealand's Expo organisers. So they "had to sing for their supper", said fundraising committee chairman Ian Cruden. The group will promote the region in return for the support they have received. The Clansmen will perform outside the New Zealand Pavilion, entertaining the people lining up to get inside. Mr Cruden said they would only perform for short periods because of the tremendous heat."

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
Clansmen On Their Way to Expo

Clansmen On Their Way to Expo

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 19th August 1992 "The Tartan Clansmen left last week for Seville in Spain, where they will represent Palmerston North at World Expo 92. First stop is Disneyland where the band will perform for three days. The promoter in Los Angeles told the Clansmen they are the first "Down Under" group to be accepted at Disneyland. From there they move to London and on to Seville, where they arrive by September 10. The group was invited to perform at Seville by Expo co-ordinator Max Cryer, who had been impressed by their performance at Brisbane Expo in 1988. Unfortunately the Clansmen could not get a class A rating, which would have meant their tour would be funded by New Zealand's Expo organisers. So they "had to sing for their supper", said fundraising committee chairman Ian Cruden. The group will promote the region in return for the support they have received. The Clansmen will perform outside the New Zealand Pavilion, entertaining the people lining up to get inside. Mr Cruden said they would only perform for short periods because of the tremendous heat."

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
[The Foise Boys]

[The Foise Boys]

This image was taken by a Manawatu Standard photographer and depicts the band 'Foise' (later Foise Master). Members: John Hicks, Matt Sanko, Ross Harkness.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
[Summer Onions]

[Summer Onions]

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 25th November 1987 "Tired, listless, unemployed? You could need Dole Day Afternoon, an extravaganza of local bands designed to shake life back in to the jaded local music scene. Organised as a joint exercise by the Unemployed Workers' Rights Centre and the Manawatu Employment Resource Centre, Dole Day Afternoon features local bands Summer Onions, The End, Arnold Splendor (featuring Max Satchell and Greg Malcolm-Boelee) and One Leg Too Short. Organiser Robin Gauld said he hopes tomorrow's bash will enable unemployed people to party without too much expense ($3 on the door), while enjoying some of the more interesting original bands about at present. Those able to skive off work are also welcome. "The entertainment angle is important, but it's also a chance to get everyone together as a group and discuss some of the heavy issues about at present like the threatened cuts in unemployment payments for under-18-year-olds," he said. Gauld says he's hoping to make the event semi-regular, mixing diverse bands at a wide range of venues and generally filling the gap since the demise of the regular Meltdown venue in the city. The venue is the Cafe de Paris, with he first band limbering up at around 1pm. {Photograph] Summer Onions just one of the bands featuring in tomorrow's Dole Day Afternoon. From right: Grey Toomey (guitar), Peter Vangioni (drums), Gerald Murphy (vocals), Grant Tucker (guitar/trumpet) and Gerard McDonald (bass)."

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
[Summer Onions]

[Summer Onions]

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 25th November 1987 "Tired, listless, unemployed? You could need Dole Day Afternoon, an extravaganza of local bands designed to shake life back in to the jaded local music scene. Organised as a joint exercise by the Unemployed Workers' Rights Centre and the Manawatu Employment Resource Centre, Dole Day Afternoon features local bands Summer Onions, The End, Arnold Splendor (featuring Max Satchell and Greg Malcolm-Boelee) and One Leg Too Short. Organiser Robin Gauld said he hopes tomorrow's bash will enable unemployed people to party without too much expense ($3 on the door), while enjoying some of the more interesting original bands about at present. Those able to skive off work are also welcome. "The entertainment angle is important, but it's also a chance to get everyone together as a group and discuss some of the heavy issues about at present like the threatened cuts in unemployment payments for under-18-year-olds," he said. Gauld says he's hoping to make the event semi-regular, mixing diverse bands at a wide range of venues and generally filling the gap since the demise of the regular Meltdown venue in the city. The venue is the Cafe de Paris, with he first band limbering up at around 1pm. {Photograph] Summer Onions just one of the bands featuring in tomorrow's Dole Day Afternoon. From right: Grey Toomey (guitar), Peter Vangioni (drums), Gerald Murphy (vocals), Grant Tucker (guitar/trumpet) and Gerard McDonald (bass)."

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Palmerston North
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