Found 9461 results

Narrow search resultsHideFilters

 
2015P_2006-116_012128
2015P_2006-116_0121252015P_2006-116_0121392015P_2006-116_0121262015P_2006-116_0121292015P_2006-116_0121302015P_2006-116_012131

Mercy Convent, Fitchett Street

The Fitchett Street Convent was the third built for the Sisters of Mercy in Palmerston North. It was designed by Clere and Clere and built by Trevor Bros in 1925 -1926. It was originally part of a complex of buildings, with two primary schools and a girls high school adjacent to it. The sisters moved out of the building to live in the community after the schools were closed, in 1982. The three storied, brick building was demolished by the Catholic Church in 1984. The decision to destroy the old convent provoked lengthy controversy.

Creator
Place
Fitchett Street, The Square, Palmerston North
 
Rotary Club and Lunch Club meeting

Rotary Club and Lunch Club meeting

A combined meeting of the Palmerston North Lunch Club and Rotary Club was held 1 December 1944 in the Premier Drapery Company tearooms to hear R.M. Algie, Member of Parliament for Remuera and Professor of Law at Auckland University, speak about war-time controls.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
"Protest March Quiet, Solemn"
2023N_2017-20_AC701_0152023N_2017-20_AC701_0022023N_2017-20_AC701_0032023N_2017-20_AC701_0042023N_2017-20_AC701_0052023N_2017-20_AC701_006

"Protest March Quiet, Solemn"

This image was taken (but not used) for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 8th of May 1970.

"More than 200 anti-Vietnam war demonstrators marched quietly and solemnly along Broadway Avenue in Palmerston North shortly after noon yesterday, carrying a dozen black-draped coffins designed to symbolise the 28 New Zealanders killed in the Vietnam War.

The demonstrators – many of whom were also carrying placards – placed the coffins in a semi-circle around the base of the Clock Tower. They were then addressed by the member for Palmerston North, Mr J. A. Walding, by Mr. R. Lyall, A Massey University English lecturer, and by Mr. A. Millar, a trade unionist.

The demonstrators were escorted by a Ministry of Transport car, with its red light flashing, and traffic was held up only for a few minutes. Both uniformed and plain clothes police officers kept a wary eye on the march, but there were no incidents. Most of the placards bore a similar theme, calling on the Government to withdraw New Zealand’s troops from the war.

Walding told the demonstrators that he believed history would regard New Zealand’s armed intervention in Vietnam as a ‘futile, tragic mistake.’ But he added, ‘To doubt the motives of the Americans, New Zealanders, and others who serve in Vietnam is wrong.
‘Less than a week ago, with others, I stood a few yards from here paying respect to New Zealand servicemen who had given their lives to preserve. Among other things, your right to protest. ‘You make their sacrifice meaningful if you exercise that right, and exercise it in a responsible manner.’”

A letter to the editor published the same day put forward a different view of the protest:

“Sir, - When visiting your city last Friday, I viewed with disgust the parade through town. My father is a First World War veteran, my husband spent six years overseas in the last war, including three and a half in a prisoner of war camp, but nobody paraded through town with placards saying they should be sent home. The men who are overseas at present are all volunteers, nobody has forced them to go. I have a friend who, on his return from Vietnam to New Zealand, immediately re-enlisted. There have been many such exhibitions as Friday’s, but I have yet to see one featuring a Vietnam veteran. What exactly do those grubby, untidy looking people who paraded on Friday expect to achieve? From what I saw of them I should say a spell in the army would not hurt some of them. If those are the people we are to entrust our children to, heaven help the next generation. What a pity they cannot channel their enthusiasm into more worthwhile activities which may bring better results for them, as I am sure the only thing they did last Friday was to make exhibitions of themselves. – DISGUSTED VISITOR, Mangaweka.”

Creator
Place
Broadway Avenue, Palmerston North
 
"Boycott Call By Students At Massey"
2023N_2017-20_AC704_0012023N_2017-20_AC704_0022023N_2017-20_AC704_0032023N_2017-20_AC704_004

"Boycott Call By Students At Massey"

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on the 8th of May 1970. "These two Massey students are part of the groups which today picketed the university calling for a boycott of lectures to protest against the shooting of students at Kent University, Ohio. They are seen distributing leaflets to Motorists driving up to the university"

The 'Kent State Shootings' occurred in the United States on 4th May 1970, where members of the National Guard opened fire on students protesting the escalation of America's military involvement in Vietnam by moving into Cambodia. The students were also protesting the presence of the National Guard on campus and the continued use of the draft to enlist soldiers.

Four students were killed and nine were injured.

The incident sparked nation-wide walkouts at hundreds of universities and high schools across the United States.

Creator
Place
Massey University, Palmerston North
 
Halt All Racist Tours protest, The Square

Halt All Racist Tours protest, The Square

Anti All Black tour demonstrators were addressed by the National President of HART, Mr. Trevor Richards, at the Clock Tower in Palmerston North’s Square. Mr. Richards spoke to the 200 strong crowd for about 45 minutes before they marched to the Showgrounds, where the North Island trials were being staged.

Creator
Place
The Square, Palmerston North
 
Barbed Wire Fence - Springbok Vs Manawatū Rugby match

Barbed Wire Fence - Springbok Vs Manawatū Rugby match

On the eve of the Springbok vs Manawatū Rugby match at the Showgrounds, army engineers from Linton moved into the grounds under the cover of darkness to ring the Oval with rolls of barbed wire.

Creator
Place
The Showgrounds. Palmerston North
 
Springbok Tour protesters

Springbok Tour protesters

Approximately 5,000 people showed their opposition to the pending Springbok rugby tour by marching down Broadway then into The Square. They assembled at the Lions Den where they were addressed by a variety of speakers. The march was headed by Labour MP for Palmerston North Mr. Joe Walding (centre). Others under the banner include Rev. Dr David Penman of All Saints Church, march organiser Bishop Peter Cullinane, Rev. Dr Alan Webster and the President of the Manawatu Trades Council Mr. Noren Byrnes. The same evening a group of 8,000 pro-tour supporters also gathered in The Square.

Creator
Place
Broadway Avenue, Palmerston North
 
Anti-Apartheid Protesters in Palmerston North

Anti-Apartheid Protesters in Palmerston North

Anti-apartheid demonstrators outside the NZI (NZ Insurance) building in Palmerston North.

Creator
Place
Rangitikei Street, Palmerston North
 
Sir Bernard Fergusson and John Mason Durie at Opening of Māori Battalion Hall

Sir Bernard Fergusson and John Mason Durie at Opening of Māori Battalion Hall

The Māori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Māori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Māori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. The man to his left is Hoani Meihana Te Rama Durie, also known as John Mason Durie (1889–1972). Mayor Gilbert Rennie was also in attendance, as well as a number of Māori veterans.

Creator
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Packing parcels for the Māori Battalion

Packing parcels for the Māori Battalion

Members of the Palmerston North Business Girls' Association met on Monday nights to make knit, write letters and pack parcels to send to soldiers of the Māori Battalion, serving overseas in World War Two. From left: Rene Elliott, Eath Englefield, Gladys Bales, Joyce Carty, Vera Royal, Audrey Kerslake, Jean Ladyman, Murial Watt, Dulcie Newth (secretary), Murial Marshall, Marie McManus, Clarice Boddy, Mary Sankey, Nell Erenstrom, Mildred Verry. Published in the 'NZ Free Lance' 3 July 1940, captioned "MAORI BATTALION FOSTER MOTHERS'.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
Opening of Māori Battalion Hall

Opening of Māori Battalion Hall

The Māori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Māori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Māori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. Mayor Gilbert Rennie was also in attendance, as well as a number of Māori veterans.

Creator
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Opening of Māori Battalion Hall

Opening of Māori Battalion Hall

The Māori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Māori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Māori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. Mayor Gilbert Rennie was also in attendance, as well as a number of Māori veterans.

Creator
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Opening of Māori Battalion Hall

Opening of Māori Battalion Hall

The Māori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Māori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Māori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. Mayor Gilbert Rennie was also in attendance, as well as a number of Māori veterans.

Creator
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Opening of Māori Battalion Hall

Opening of Māori Battalion Hall

The Māori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Māori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Māori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. Mayor Gilbert Rennie was also in attendance, as well as a number of Māori veterans.

Creator
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Māori Battalion Hall

Māori Battalion Hall

The Māori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Māori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Māori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson.

Creator
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Massey Agricultural College Student 'Procesh' - A.E. Clausen & Contractors truck

Massey Agricultural College Student 'Procesh' - A.E. Clausen & Contractors truck

The writing on this truck is only partially legible with the word "Resign" clearly visible on the side, indicating this truck is decorated as part of a capping parade mock protest. The image was taken in front of the National Bank of New Zealand building on the corner of Rangitikei Street and Cuba Streets, circa 1950s. A Capping Day procession, 'Procesh', first took place through the central streets of Palmerston North in 1935. Massey Agricultural College developed into Massey University in the 1960s.

Creator
Place
Unknown
 
Clarendon Building, corner of The Square and Rangitikei Street

Clarendon Building, corner of The Square and Rangitikei Street

Built as the Clarendon Hotel in 1904, the building became commercial premises after the hotel closed due to a fire c1925. An original third floor was removed after the 1931 earthquake. Goldfinch and Cousins occupied premises in the building from 1927-1975. Colonial Mutual Life (CML) purchased the building in 1950, and it was demolished c. 1975 for a new CML 6-storey office building. This building now houses 'The Hub' accommodation block, with shops at ground level. Beyond can be seen the (now demolished) former National Bank of New Zealand, on the corner of Cuba Street and Rangitikei Street.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
View over Palmerston North from the Telecom Tower

View over Palmerston North from the Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street down Princess Street (central street) to the church on the corner of Ferguson and Morris Streets. Beyond can be seen the Tararua Ranges. Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street, down Main Street, towards Ashhurst and the Ruahine Ranges. Running parallel to the right is Church Street. Cars can be seen parked on the recently uplifted railway track land, after the station and train lines were relocated to the edge of the city. Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street, across to Broadway and beyond. The Regent Theatre, then a cinema, can be seen at centre, along with other businesses on Broadway. Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
View over Palmerston North from the Telecom Tower

View over Palmerston North from the Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street down onto Church Street and the construction of the Manawatu-Oroua Power Board building. Beyond left can be see the church on the corner of Ferguson and Morris Streets. Beyond can be seen the Tararua Ranges. Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street down onto Princess Street, between the corner of Main and Princess at right, to corner of Broadway and Princess to left. the Catholic Cathedral, St Patricks can be seen clearly on Broadway. Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
View of The Square and Railway Land from the Telecom Tower

View of The Square and Railway Land from the Telecom Tower

Looking from the top of the Telecom Tower, over The Square, and down over the Railway Land (formerly the yards and station for the railway).

One of a set of photographs taken from the Telecom Tower during its construction.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street, down to the roundabout on the corner of Princess Street and Broadway. Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Princess Street and Broadway Avewnue, Palmerston North
 
View over Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

View over Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street directly towards the Aokautere area and the Tararua Ranges in the background. Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street, looking roughly south-east. the T& G toweron Broadway can be clearly seen at centre, and the small, original Post Office on Main Street in the foreground left (this is now the Cafe at the Esplanade). Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street, down to the corner of Princess Street and Church Street, with Ferguson Street to the right. Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
Overlooking Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Overlooking Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Looking down to the corner of Main Street, with the then Public Library on the left foreground and the then Chief Post Office on right foreground. Shows across one side of The Square to corner of Coleman Place, with the DIC department Store facing.

A set of photos taken when the Telecom Tower was being constructed.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
Overlooking Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Overlooking Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street towards the Tararua Ranges in the background. Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
 
View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

View of Palmerston North from Telecom Tower

Looking from the Telecom Tower on Main Street, across Broadway and beyond. The Regent Theatre, then a cinema, can be seen at left on Broadway. Photograph taken during the early stages of construction of the tower.

Creator
Place
Palmerston North
Load Items 31 to NaN