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Maori Warden George Rerekura

Maori Warden George Rerekura

This image was taken as part a feature that ran in the Manawatu Evening Standard on January 17 1987 about the work of Maori Wardens in Marton. According to the story that accompanied the photographs, Maori Wardens were instituted in 1937 and by 1987 there were 2300 working voluntarily throughout in New Zealand under the jurisdiction of the Maori Wardens' Association. Before receiving their badges and warrants, trainee wardens underwent an 18 month probationary period, taking training from senior wardens and the district wardens' associations.

 
Last train through The Square

Last train through The Square

One of the last, special, excursion trains to go through The Square in either March or June 1964. The Milson deviation had been opened in 1960 and the new Railway Station in 1963, removing the need for trains to travel through the centre of the city and down Main Street. The railway tracks were then removed. The train full of passengers is shown here going past the Post Office, on the corner of Main Street, and entering The Square.

 
Awapuni Memorial Restoration

Awapuni Memorial Restoration

A project got underway in 2014 to clean up and restore the Awapuni Memorial at the Palmerston North Racecourse. This photograph shows some of the early work in clearing the site. The work was carried out by the 2nd Health Support Battalion of the New Zealand Army based at Linton Camp, and Council staff volunteers. The memorial, dedicated to the memory of officers and men of the New Zealand Medical Corps (1914-1918) who were trained at Awapuni Racecourse during WWI, was erected in 1929. The memorial is a stone cairn fountain, inside a pool constructed in the shape of a cross.

 
Centennial Pavilion

Centennial Pavilion

The Centennial Pavilion was constructed in The Square for the 1971 Centennial. Comprised of a series of prefabricated buildings that sat opposite Main Street and the Commercial Hotel, the Centennial Pavilion was a meeting hall used by the community. It was reloacted to Kaimanawa Street in 1980, where it became the Kelvin Grove Community Centre.

 
Centennial Pavilion

Centennial Pavilion

The Centennial Pavilion was constructed in The Square for the 1971 Centennial. Comprised of a series of prefabricated buildings that sat opposite Main Street and the Commercial Hotel, the Centennial Pavilion was a meeting hall used by the community. It was reloacted to Kaimanawa Street in 1980, where it became the Kelvin Grove Community Centre.

 
Centennial Pavilion

Centennial Pavilion

The Centennial Pavilion was constructed in The Square for the 1971 Centennial. Comprised of a series of prefabricated buildings that sat opposite Main Street and the Commercial Hotel, the Centennial Pavilion was a meeting hall used by the community. It was reloacted to Kaimanawa Street in 1980, where it became the Kelvin Grove Community Centre.

 
Centennial Pavilion

Centennial Pavilion

The Centennial Pavilion was constructed in The Square for the 1971 Centennial. Comprised of a series of prefabricated buildings that sat opposite Main Street and the Commercial Hotel, the Centennial Pavilion was a meeting hall used by the community. It was reloacted to Kaimanawa Street in 1980, where it became the Kelvin Grove Community Centre.

 
'Woodleigh', Marton

'Woodleigh', Marton

James Chapman-Taylor designed this house, in Tutaenui Road, Marton, in 1910. Chapman-Taylor started off as a builder and then studied architecture and design with the International Correspondence Schools of the United States. He built Woodleigh a year after he had travelled to England, where he was influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement. It’s unusual layout features a central courtyard which all the rooms are arranged around. It is built with whitewashed bricks, terracotta roof tiles (individually stamped with the makers' marks – from Marseilles) heavy jarrah beams from Australia and small-framed, hand-crafted windows. Chapman-Taylor stated that the home was not intended to be "old fashioned", but rather, "a building that meets aesthetic and practical requirements without resort to artifices, shams or imitations". It was named by John Vickers, the current owner, in 1969 when he bought the house.

 
Woodleigh' garden, Marton

Woodleigh' garden, Marton

Irises in the garden of 'Woodleigh'. James Chapman-Taylor designed the house, in Tutaenui Road, Marton, in 1910. Chapman-Taylor started off as a builder and then studied architecture and design with the International Correspondence Schools of the United States. He built Woodleigh a year after he had travelled to England, where he was influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement. It’s unusual layout features a central courtyard which all the rooms are arranged around. It is built with whitewashed bricks, terracotta roof tiles (individually stamped with the makers' marks – from Marseilles) heavy jarrah beams from Australia and small-framed, hand-crafted windows. Chapman-Taylor stated that the home was not intended to be "old fashioned", but rather, "a building that meets aesthetic and practical requirements without resort to artifices, shams or imitations". It was named by John Vickers, the current owner, in 1969 when he bought the house, and it was the Vickers who established the gardens as they are today.

 
'Woodleigh', Marton

'Woodleigh', Marton

James Chapman-Taylor designed this house, in Tutaenui Road, Marton, in 1910. Chapman-Taylor started off as a builder and then studied architecture and design with the International Correspondence Schools of the United States. He built Woodleigh a year after he had travelled to England, where he was influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement. It’s unusual layout features a central courtyard which all the rooms are arranged around. It is built with whitewashed bricks, terracotta roof tiles (individually stamped with the makers' marks – from Marseilles) heavy jarrah beams from Australia and small-framed, hand-crafted windows. Chapman-Taylor stated that the home was not intended to be "old fashioned", but rather, "a building that meets aesthetic and practical requirements without resort to artifices, shams or imitations". It was named by John Vickers, the current owner, in 1969 when he bought the house.

 
36 The Square – ‘Childs’ building’, now Lone Star Café & Bar

36 The Square – ‘Childs’ building’, now Lone Star Café & Bar

This building replaced William Park’s bookshop, which burnt down on 16 March 1928. Thorrold-Jaggard designed it in April 1928 for Mrs Emma Childs. Then of Lyall Bay, she was the widow of Tom Childs, former licencee of the nearby Commercial Hotel. Built by Mr H. Dickel at a cost of £2,656, it comprised of two shops and a separate workspace or office space upstairs that was accessed directly from the footpath. For many years, one of the shops – and perhaps the workspace upstairs – was occupied by a succession of men’s tailoring shops, including Coopers Ltd. (1930s-1940s) and Manly Outfitters (c1950), with Puddleducks and the Ocakbasi Turkish Kebab shop sharing it by the early 1990s. The Lone Star Café & Bar now occupies it. The building’s design has some classical elements, for example, the use of wreaths to decorate the side columns of the façade. It also draws on the Art Deco style due to the geometric motif on the upper façade.

 
"Working Bee Provides Footpaths"

"Working Bee Provides Footpaths"

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 25 July, 1959. "A working bee is laying a footpath in the Takaro area. The City Council has provided the material and a concrete mixer for the job. The local residents would have had to wait at least three years before the council could do the work."

 
'Woodleigh' gardens, Marton

'Woodleigh' gardens, Marton

Part of the gardens at 'Woodleigh'. James Chapman-Taylor designed this house, in Tutaenui Road, Marton, in 1910. Chapman-Taylor started off as a builder and then studied architecture and design with the International Correspondence Schools of the United States. He built Woodleigh a year after he had travelled to England, where he was influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement. It’s unusual layout features a central courtyard which all the rooms are arranged around. It is built with whitewashed bricks, terracotta roof tiles (individually stamped with the makers' marks – from Marseilles) heavy jarrah beams from Australia and small-framed, hand-crafted windows. Chapman-Taylor stated that the home was not intended to be "old fashioned", but rather, "a building that meets aesthetic and practical requirements without resort to artifices, shams or imitations". It was named by John Vickers, the current owner, in 1969 when he bought the house, and it was the Vickers who established the gardens as they are today.

 
View across the Manawatū River

View across the Manawatū River

View from the top of Te Arapiki a Tane (the stairway of Tane), looking across the Manawatū River to the recently developed river walkway. Access is from Te Motu o Poutoa and off Vaucluse Heights, with the steps linking to other river network pathways, including He Ara Kotahi.

 
View across the Manawatū River

View across the Manawatū River

View from the top of Te Arapiki a Tane (the stairway of Tane), looking across the Manawatū River. Access is from Te Motu o Poutoa and off Vaucluse Heights, with the steps linking to other river network pathways, including He Ara Kotahi. ##

 
Green Corridors signage, Summerhill

Green Corridors signage, Summerhill

The Green Corridors programme enhances areas of native bush along streams, provides a place for wildlife to thrive, improves water quality, and creates open green spaces from the Tararua Ranges to the Manawatū River. The programme is run by a voluntary group that works with Council to plan and oversee the planting. The Summerhill Green Corridors began planting in 2009.

Creator
Date
November 9, 2020
Place
Summerhill, Palmerston North
 
Green Corridors, Summerhill

Green Corridors, Summerhill

The Green Corridors programme enhances areas of native bush along streams, provides a place for wildlife to thrive, improves water quality, and creates open green spaces from the Tararua Ranges to the Manawatū River. The programme is run by a voluntary group that works with Council to plan and oversee the planting. The Green Corridors in Summerhill began planting in 2009.

Creator
Date
November 9, 2020
Place
Summerhill, Palmerston North
 
'Woodleigh', Marton

'Woodleigh', Marton

James Chapman-Taylor designed this house, in Tutaenui Road, Marton, in 1910. Chapman-Taylor started off as a builder and then studied architecture and design with the International Correspondence Schools of the United States. He built Woodleigh a year after he had travelled to England, where he was influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement. It’s unusual layout features a central courtyard which all the rooms are arranged around. It is built with whitewashed bricks, terracotta roof tiles (individually stamped with the makers' marks – from Marseilles) heavy jarrah beams from Australia and small-framed, hand-crafted windows. Chapman-Taylor stated that the home was not intended to be "old fashioned", but rather, "a building that meets aesthetic and practical requirements without resort to artifices, shams or imitations". It was named by John Vickers, the current owner, in 1969 when he bought the house.

 
"City Council Sunk By Army"

"City Council Sunk By Army"

This image was not published in The Manawatu Evening Standard, taken on 21 January, 1964. "During the jousting tournament for the "wooden spoon" at the Carnival of the Lake, between Army and the "Kouncil Knights" disaster overtook the City Council crew. Coming in to attack, they turned broadside on and were dealt a mortal blow by Army. A thunderflash, thrown into the water, exploded under the keel and blew a hole in the plates. looking like a submarine diving, the gondola sank in a dignified dive, leaving the crew floundering in the lake. Navy divers and the Army soon salvaged the stricken vessel." See Also: 2017N_2017-20_018340, 2017N_2017-20_018342, 2017N_2017-20_018343, 2017N_2017-20_018344

 
Military Guard of Honour at Wedding

Military Guard of Honour at Wedding

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 3 June, 1963. "Lieutenant A. W. Ancell and Mrs Ancell and attendants leaving All Saints' Church after their wedding on Saturday. The military guard of honour was formed by fellow officers of the bridegroom from Linton Military Camp. The bride was formerly Miss C. E. Taylor, of Palmerston North."

 
View from Te Motu o Poutoa

View from Te Motu o Poutoa

View of cows and paddocks on Massey University farmland. Beyond the cows can be seen the beginning of Summerhill Drive. Poutoa was an ancestor of Rangitāne. His descendants include Paewai, Te Awe Awe, Te Rangiotu and other families. The land was purchased from Kairanga County Council as Anzac Park in 1916. It is assumed that at some point prior to this date, the Patriotic Society renamed the park. Later it was also informally referred to as Pork Chop Hill. From 1962-63, the site changed significantly. A ridge was lowered 20 metres to form the plateau that exists today and in 1964-65, a lookout station, car park and picnic spots were formed. The Palmerston North Astronomical Society observatory was built in 1971. Te Motu o Poutoa will be co-managed by Council and Rangitāne as partners following the adoption of the Kawenata in relation to Te Motu o Poutoa.

Creator
Date
November 9, 2020
Place
Te Motu o Poutoa, Palmerston North
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