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Back Issues: Palmerston North's boom and bloom

Back Issues: Palmerston North's boom and bloom

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Article about Palmerston North's rapid growth and development since World War 2.

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Place
Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Celebrating 'the people's playground'

Back Issues: Celebrating 'the people's playground'

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Esplanade has long provided unforgettable memories for Palmerstonians. This article outlines the history of Victoria Esplanade and its attractions since opening in 1897.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Revisiting Cobbe's Magic Cave

Back Issues: Revisiting Cobbe's Magic Cave

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Magic Cave at John Cobbe's Department store was a popular Christmas attraction for Feilding children.

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Place
Feilding
 
Back Issues: Historic sawmill's curious remnants

Back Issues: Historic sawmill's curious remnants

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The history of Palmerston North's early sawmills. Scandanavian settlers established one of the earliest mills in Terrace End, Richter, Nannestad & Co. The concrete remains of the old Terrace End sawmills were retained under houses in Albert Street until 2016.

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Place
Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Recreating a little bit of Latvia

Back Issues: Recreating a little bit of Latvia

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. European refugees, displaced persons after World War 2, started arriving at a camp in Pahiatua in 1949. This article describes the story of Lucija (Lucy) Ozolins née Upenajs who came to New Zealand with her husband Martins and brother-in law Nikolajs Zvaigzne from Latvia. After six weeks at the camp in Pahiatua, they settled in Palmerston North.
Lucy's story is part of the Untold Stories project, which describes the experiences of the immigrants who spent time at the Pahiatua camp.

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Pahiatua
 
Four dancers

Four dancers

Four dancers posed in a row. The group were pupils of the well-known Palmerston North dance teacher Zona Broughton. From left: Marilyn Jeffrey, Angela Ayers, Andrea Ross and Linda Borlase.

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Group of five dancers

Group of five dancers

A group of five young dancers, pupils of the well-known Palmerston North dance teacher Zona Broughton.
Back row left to right: Andrea Ross and Marilyn Jeffrey. Front row left to right: Linda Borlase, Judith Jeffrey and Angela Ayers.

Place
Palmerston North
 
Railway Bridge, Tokomaru

Railway Bridge, Tokomaru

 
Alison Quigan - oral interview

Alison Quigan - oral interview

Interview with Alison Quigan. Interviewer Ian Johnston, in Palmerston North.

Alison Marie Quigan is a New Zealand actor, director and playwright. Quigan was the artistic director of Centrepoint Theatre in Palmerston North for 18 years from 1986 to 2004. She directed over 60 plays during her time there. In the 2001 Birthday Honours, Quigan received a Queens Service Medal for "public services to theatre".

Interview mainly talks about Quigan's time as Centrepoint Theatre's Artistic Director. Also includes specific mention of getting involved in local theatre, Theatre Corporate Drama School, acting at Centrepoint and Court Theatres, and makes mention of many local and national actors and directors.

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Back Issues: From institution to foster care

Back Issues: From institution to foster care

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. For more than half a century, All Saints' Children's home was a refuge for children who had nowhere else to go. The home was owned by the All Saints' Children's Home Trust. The original home on the corner of Ada and Ferguson Streets took its first three children in October 1906. A new, larger home opened on the corner of Pascal and Cuba Streets in 1931. A steady stream of children were cared for. They were often from families that had broken down, where parents had to work and the home provided childcare.
By the 1960s, the children's home model was outdated. Government preferred crises care to be provided by family units, or "natural family substitutes". The Trust which ran the children's homes continued. In 2022, the Trust is part of ACROSS - Anglican, Catholic and Community Support Service. It provides social work, counselling and foster care services for families.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Mythic claim to the silver fern

Back Issues: Mythic claim to the silver fern

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Feilding Rugby Club was the first rugby club in the Manawatū, founded in 1878. The club came to believe their early club colours were a black jersey with a silver fern. Stephen Berg has examined historic records, which indicate that it is unlikely that Feilding Football Club players played in a black jersey with a silver fern. The club now goes by the nickname the Yellows, a colour that has been worn by players since 1894.

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Manawatū
 
Back Issues: Hokowhitu's richly contested plot of land

Back Issues: Hokowhitu's richly contested plot of land

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. When members of Rangitāne sold land at Hokowhitu to the Crown in 1892-93, it was surveyed into sections. Low lying and flood prone section 262 extended from what is now the riverside end of Jickell Street eastwards to the golf course, with the lagoon to its north and the Manawatū River to its south. This article outlines the ownership and development of section 262 from 1892 to the present day.

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Hokowhitu
 
Back Issues: How we got a four term school year

Back Issues: How we got a four term school year

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. In 1996 New Zealand schools changed from three school terms each year to four shorter school terms. There have been various bold proposals for redrawing the school calendar over the past century.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Talents took centre stage for kindy fundraisers

Back Issues: Talents took centre stage for kindy fundraisers

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Fundraising talent shows were organised by kindergarten parents, 1958-1970s. Parents from different kindergartens organised and performed in the shows. These were held at the Palmerston North Concert Chamber, the Council Chambers, the old Opera House and later in the Regent Theatre.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: The fight for the 'torturous' gorge road

Back Issues: The fight for the 'torturous' gorge road

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Manawatū Gorge has been a vital east -west access way since people first came to the region. For Māori, the river was the highway through the gorge they called Te Āpiti. Road formation and bridge building started in the 1860s. Road improvements developed as the number of motor vehicles increased, and an official opening of the road was held in 1926.
Throughout its history, the road has had regular slips and fallen boulders, with frequent road closures necessary for repair work. When slips closed the road in April 2015 and again in April 2017, the road was closed forever.

Building of a replacement route Te Ahu a Turanga - Manawatū Tararua Highway began in 2020 and is due to be completed mid 2025.

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Place
Manawatu
 
Back Issues: Concrete evidence of a proud Palmy look

Back Issues: Concrete evidence of a proud Palmy look

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Concrete log fences are almost a unique Palmerston North feature. There are some 30 homes throughout the city with the fences, built in the 1920s. The most recognised of the fences surrounds 170 Russell Street, the "Log Cabin" house.

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Back Issues: Society's seeds were planted 100 years ago

Back Issues: Society's seeds were planted 100 years ago

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Palmerston North Horticultural Society celebrates 100 years. Forming a horticultural society was discussed as early as 1881, but it was not permanently established until 1922. Throughout the years, the key aims of the Palmerston North Horticultural Society have remained the same: Horticultural education, the fostering of industry, promoting the beautification of public and private spaces and bringing together like-minded horticultural enthusiasts.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: What was making the news 50 years ago today?

Back Issues: What was making the news 50 years ago today?

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Fifty years ago newspapers were going through a period of change. They were facing competition from television and radio news, technological change and shifts in ownership. This article sumarises what made the news in the Evening Standard on 18 May 1974.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Ugly duckling or hidden swan? Palmerston North railway station

Back Issues: Ugly duckling or hidden swan? Palmerston North railway station

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. History of the Palmerston North railway station building. Planning for the present (2024) third Palmerston North railway station in Matthews Avenue Takaro, started in the 1920s. Plans were revised in 1939 and again after WWII to incorporate new station design. It officially opened 21 October 1963.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Twilight years of cricket in Palmerston North

Back Issues: Twilight years of cricket in Palmerston North

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Manawatū Cricket Association (MCA) took advantage of the introduction of daylight saving in 1974 and established a midweek "Twilight Competition" for clubs and business houses in Palmerston North. 14 Teams entered the first season and artificial cricket pitch installations commenced to replace the poor quality grass at Ongley Park.
By 1986/87, 111 teams entered the competition, making it the largest competition of its kind in New Zealand. The rising popularity of touch rugby saw the reduction of twilight cricket teams to 17 by the 2022/23 season.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Last of the swagmen

Back Issues: Last of the swagmen

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Bernet Krumin, also known as Barnett Crumin, Barrett Crumen (or Krumen) was born in Latvia in 1878. He was better known in New Zealand as Russian Jack and walked North Island roads for 53 years. Most of the roads the swagman travelled were in the Manawatū, Wairarapa and Rangitīkei.

Bernet regularly travelled to Palmerston North and visited the Leyland family who lived in College Street. He died aged 90 in 1968 and is buried in Greytown cemetery.

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Lower North Island
 
Back Issues: Ode to the Manawatū mosquito

Back Issues: Ode to the Manawatū mosquito

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. In the 1800s, Manawatū mosquitoes dominated forests and wetlands. They were a challenge for Māori, the new settlers and livestock. Historical accounts reported swarms of bloodthirsty mosquitoes fatally attacking dogs.

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Manawatū
 
Back Issues:The hurricane and the big match

Back Issues:The hurricane and the big match

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The 1936 storm that destroyed the Sportsground (Fitzherbert Park) grandstand and forced the abandonment of an international cricket match.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: An indelible contribution to the rise of kindergarten

Back Issues: An indelible contribution to the rise of kindergarten

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. From 1958, the government required that new kindergartens be established in specially designed buildings. Kindergartens were owned and operated by committees, requiring community planning, local fundraising and extensive parent involvement. The Palmerston North Free Kindergarten Association oversaw the opening of the Hokowhitu Kindergarten in 1958. The association was renamed Manawatū Free Kindergarten in 1969, when it oversaw 22 kindergartens. A key local figure was Edith (Edie) Martin, whose contributions spanned 30 years and included being a mother help, an associate president and seven years as National President of the New Zealand Free Kindergarten Association (NZFKA).

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Manawatū
 
Back Issues: Firmness and fairness from the bench

Back Issues: Firmness and fairness from the bench

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Judge Herbert Percival Lawry ruled on all matters of criminality and injustice in Palmerston North 1937-1945. He was recognised for his practical and humanitarian qualities in dispensing justice.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: The election campaign that turned a swing seat red

Back Issues: The election campaign that turned a swing seat red

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Since World War 2, Palmerston North was considered a swing seat, with National or Labour candidates winning elections. In 1978 it was the country's second most marginal seat and the two parties battled for the city. Party leaders held several local contentious meetings, with protest action directed mainly at National leader Robert Muldoon. The seat was won by Labour's Joe Walding and has since been held by the Labour Party. (2024).

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: When MRSA outbreak gripped city

Back Issues: When MRSA outbreak gripped city

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. In January 1986, routine testing detected the presence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in two patients in Palmerston North. It was the start of an outbreak that put increased pressure on staff at a time when there was a shortage of nurses. MRSA was detected in 253 patients and 17 staff between 1986 and 1989. Despite it being a significant problem for several years, Palmerston North Hospital succeeded in eliminating MRSA with no deaths attributed to the outbreak.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Ovation to a legacy of evolution and song

Back Issues: Ovation to a legacy of evolution and song

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. History of musical theatre in Palmerston North. In 1900, the Palmerston North Amateur Dramatic Society was formed. Over its nearly 125 year history it has been known by several names including Act Three Productions, Abbey Musical Theatre and the Palmerston North Operatic Society. Many popular productions have been staged over the years at the Lyceum Theatre, the Palmerston North Opera House, Abbey Musical Theatre, the Regent on Broadway and Wallace Development Company Theatre.

The Covid pandemic caused disruptions, cancellations and major financial losses for the society. However, with 200 dedicated members and a return to staging major productions, popular musical theatre is set to continue in the city.

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Palmerston North
 
126-136 The Square – Former Palmerston North Chief Post Office

126-136 The Square – Former Palmerston North Chief Post Office

Architect Joshua Charlesworth, of Wellington, designed Palmerston North’s former Chief Post Office. James Trevor & Sons, of Wellington, erected the building in brick with cement render, after a tender of £5,254. Its foundation stone was laid by Postmaster-General Sir Joseph Ward on 27 May 1905, and it was officially opened by Ward on 5 February 1906.

In 1916-17 it was extended to its present form along its Square frontage, and enlarged twice, once in 1927, then in 1938.

The building’s elegant 24.3 metre asymmetrical tower, which was removed soon after the 1942 earthquake, originally housed the four-faced clock and chimes that is now part of the Hopwood Clock Tower in the Square. The clock, which was officially started on 9 November 1906, was christened ‘Kerei Te Panau’ after the very elderly Rangitāne chief, who was present for the event.

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473-483 Main Street
 
476-482 Main Street - The Square Centre, former Public Library

476-482 Main Street - The Square Centre, former Public Library

The Borough Council bought this site in 1889. The present building was designed by James Walker and Lloyd C. Love, built by L. McMillan & Co. Ltd. at a cost of £300,000, and was opened on 4 November 1965.

The building’s exterior was designed to be as maintenance-free as possible. Eighteen unique stainless steel solar screens covered the Main Street frontage until 2011. Designed to admit maximum light, they also blocked the sun’s glare and heat. Adjustable aluminium louvers shielded the Square frontage. The terrazzo panelling on the building’s exterior consisted of polished marble aggregate, with golden brown aggregate on the ground floor exterior walls being Italian rumble marble. The main double staircase and the water feature beneath it also incorporated these materials.

Significant refurbishment in 2011 included removing the exterior screens, and the installation of tinted, double-glazed windows on the upper floors. Later additional windows were installed in the wall overlooking the Square.

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Place
476-482 Main Street, Palmerston North
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