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Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Black and White photographs of Caccia Birch taken pre-restoriation circa 1980. The purpose of the photographs was to show the state of the house and grounds before submissions were made to council and the Ministry of Works. First built in 1892 by Jacob Nannerstad, a local sawmiller, the house was one of the preeminent buildings of early Palmerston North. Extensive renovations were undertaken in 1905 by the new owner, John Strang, with the addition of two conservatories, a coach house and attached cottage. From 1908 to 1910 the house was home to Lord Plunket, with the house being sold to William Caccia-Birch in 1921.0 Although Wiliam died in 1936, his widow maintained the house until 1939, whereupon the house was donated to New Zealand Government as part of the war effort. After the war, the house was variously owned by the Department of Health, Victoria University, Massey College & Palmerston North Teachers College, before finally being passed to the Palmerston North City Council.

 
Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Black and White photographs of Caccia Birch taken pre-restoriation circa 1980. The purpose of the photographs was to show the state of the house and grounds before submissions were made to council and the Ministry of Works. First built in 1892 by Jacob Nannerstad, a local sawmiller, the house was one of the preeminent buildings of early Palmerston North. Extensive renovations were undertaken in 1905 by the new owner, John Strang, with the addition of two conservatories, a coach house and attached cottage. From 1908 to 1910 the house was home to Lord Plunket, with the house being sold to William Caccia-Birch in 1921.0 Although Wiliam died in 1936, his widow maintained the house until 1939, whereupon the house was donated to New Zealand Government as part of the war effort. After the war, the house was variously owned by the Department of Health, Victoria University, Massey College & Palmerston North Teachers College, before finally being passed to the Palmerston North City Council.

 
Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Black and White photographs of Caccia Birch taken pre-restoriation circa 1980. The purpose of the photographs was to show the state of the house and grounds before submissions were made to council and the Ministry of Works. First built in 1892 by Jacob Nannerstad, a local sawmiller, the house was one of the preeminent buildings of early Palmerston North. Extensive renovations were undertaken in 1905 by the new owner, John Strang, with the addition of two conservatories, a coach house and attached cottage. From 1908 to 1910 the house was home to Lord Plunket, with the house being sold to William Caccia-Birch in 1921.0 Although Wiliam died in 1936, his widow maintained the house until 1939, whereupon the house was donated to New Zealand Government as part of the war effort. After the war, the house was variously owned by the Department of Health, Victoria University, Massey College & Palmerston North Teachers College, before finally being passed to the Palmerston North City Council.

 
Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Black and White photographs of Caccia Birch taken pre-restoriation circa 1980. The purpose of the photographs was to show the state of the house and grounds before submissions were made to council and the Ministry of Works. First built in 1892 by Jacob Nannerstad, a local sawmiller, the house was one of the preeminent buildings of early Palmerston North. Extensive renovations were undertaken in 1905 by the new owner, John Strang, with the addition of two conservatories, a coach house and attached cottage. From 1908 to 1910 the house was home to Lord Plunket, with the house being sold to William Caccia-Birch in 1921.0 Although Wiliam died in 1936, his widow maintained the house until 1939, whereupon the house was donated to New Zealand Government as part of the war effort. After the war, the house was variously owned by the Department of Health, Victoria University, Massey College & Palmerston North Teachers College, before finally being passed to the Palmerston North City Council.

 
Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Black and White photographs of Caccia Birch taken pre-restoriation circa 1980. The purpose of the photographs was to show the state of the house and grounds before submissions were made to council and the Ministry of Works. First built in 1892 by Jacob Nannerstad, a local sawmiller, the house was one of the preeminent buildings of early Palmerston North. Extensive renovations were undertaken in 1905 by the new owner, John Strang, with the addition of two conservatories, a coach house and attached cottage. From 1908 to 1910 the house was home to Lord Plunket, with the house being sold to William Caccia-Birch in 1921.0 Although Wiliam died in 1936, his widow maintained the house until 1939, whereupon the house was donated to New Zealand Government as part of the war effort. After the war, the house was variously owned by the Department of Health, Victoria University, Massey College & Palmerston North Teachers College, before finally being passed to the Palmerston North City Council.

 
Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Black and White photographs of Caccia Birch taken pre-restoriation circa 1980. The purpose of the photographs was to show the state of the house and grounds before submissions were made to council and the Ministry of Works. First built in 1892 by Jacob Nannerstad, a local sawmiller, the house was one of the preeminent buildings of early Palmerston North. Extensive renovations were undertaken in 1905 by the new owner, John Strang, with the addition of two conservatories, a coach house and attached cottage. From 1908 to 1910 the house was home to Lord Plunket, with the house being sold to William Caccia-Birch in 1921.0 Although Wiliam died in 1936, his widow maintained the house until 1939, whereupon the house was donated to New Zealand Government as part of the war effort. After the war, the house was variously owned by the Department of Health, Victoria University, Massey College & Palmerston North Teachers College, before finally being passed to the Palmerston North City Council.

 
Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Caccia Birch Pre-Restoration Photograph

Black and White photographs of Caccia Birch taken pre-restoriation circa 1980. The purpose of the photographs was to show the state of the house and grounds before submissions were made to council and the Ministry of Works. First built in 1892 by Jacob Nannerstad, a local sawmiller, the house was one of the preeminent buildings of early Palmerston North. Extensive renovations were undertaken in 1905 by the new owner, John Strang, with the addition of two conservatories, a coach house and attached cottage. From 1908 to 1910 the house was home to Lord Plunket, with the house being sold to William Caccia-Birch in 1921.0 Although Wiliam died in 1936, his widow maintained the house until 1939, whereupon the house was donated to New Zealand Government as part of the war effort. After the war, the house was variously owned by the Department of Health, Victoria University, Massey College & Palmerston North Teachers College, before finally being passed to the Palmerston North City Council.

 
Book chain, transporting books to the new Palmerston North City Library

Book chain, transporting books to the new Palmerston North City Library

A human book chain was used to transport some of the books from the former Public Library to the new Library on the opposite side of The Square. Children and Army personnel helped to transport books. The purple cushion was made by Tessa Burt, a staff member, to carry the first book across into the new Library.

 
Public Library and George Street redevelopment sign

Public Library and George Street redevelopment sign

PNCC sign erected on the new Palmerston North City Library building undergoing renovation, giving cost and names of Contactors, Engineers, Architects and subcontracting managers. The building was originally the C M Ross Co Ltd department store, which extended through to George Street. The redevelopment included the demolition of shops in George Street, and the erection of a new retail block, with the Library extending above.

 
Construction of the new Palmerston North City Library

Construction of the new Palmerston North City Library

The new City Library building was originally built as the C M Ross department store in 1928. It was bought by the City Council and renovated as the new Library, opening 1996. This view is of the conversion of the former tearooms on the second floor, and shows the original rosewood panelling being exposed. This was a feature of the tearooms, but has now been removed.

 
Palmerston North Rate Book 1895 - 1896 (M - Z)
PNCC rate book 1895 - 1896PNCC rate book 1895 - 1896PNCC rate book 1895 - 1896PNCC rate book 1895 - 1896PNCC rate book 1895 - 1896+46
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Palmerston North Rate Book 1895 - 1896 (M - Z)

Palmerston North Borough Council rate book, listing rate payers whose names begin M to Z, for the year 1 April 1895 - 31 March 1896. Gives names, legal description of property and rates paid. This volume begins with surnames starting with the letter 'M' for 1895 - 1896 rating year. The first part of this year can be found in the preceding rate book at 2017Vo\_PNCC-2-23-2-V6\_023291.

 
Palmerston North Rate Book, 1886-1889
Palmerston North Rate Book, 1886-1889, 2Palmerston North Rate Book, 1886-1889, 3Palmerston North Rate Book, 1886-1889, 4Palmerston North Rate Book, 1886-1889, 5Palmerston North Rate Book, 1886-1889, 6+277
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Palmerston North Rate Book, 1886-1889

Rate book for ratepayers of PNBC, for the years 1886 - 1887, 1887 - 1888 and 1888 - 1889. Handwritten. Information includes occupier, address, owner (if different), description of the property and rating values. Volume 3 that precedes this volume repeats information held in Volume 4 (so is not digitised).

 
Regent Theatre - blueprints
Regent Theatre - Balcony Floor PlanRegent Theatre - Preliminary Balcony PlanRegent Theatre - Side Elevation to CourtRegent Theatre - Elevation 30-0 and 63-6Regent Theatre - Detail of Balk Blocks and Floor RecessesRegent Theatre - Orchestra Floor Plan

Regent Theatre - blueprints

The Regent Theatre was built by the Australasian cinema and theatre chain J.C. Williamson Limited. Williamson's began its New Zealand operation in 1926. The theatre, one of several Regents built throughout New Zealand and Australia at this time, was a dual-purpose cinema and theatre. The Melbourne architect Charles Hollinshed was hired to design the building which was completed in 1930, becoming the largest and most lavish auditorium in the city. It retained its twin functions for much of its life, before falling into relative disuse and eventually closing in 1991. The Palmerston North City Council purchased the building 1993 and began restoration work in 1996. The Regent Theatre is a now rare survivor of the heyday of the theatre/cinema. As the only such venue in Palmerston North to survive to this day, the Regent is of great social importance to the city. The exterior design, and to a much greater degree, interior design are remarkably authentic and rare examples of theatre design in New Zealand, and as such, the Regent is a landmark building in type and style. The exterior is built in the Art Deco style, while the interior is Persian painted plaster ornament. The external symmetry, vertical fins, shallow stylised relief, stepped skyline, and chevron ornament are typical of the Art Deco style. The main entrance, with walls of coloured plaster and travertine, leads into a large barrel-vaulted, double height space, off which there are the entrances to the main performance space. The interior decoration of the theatre is taken directly from Owen Jones' book on design, “Grammar of Ornament.” The auditorium seats 1393 people in a two-tier circle and stalls arrangement (originally it accommodated 1600 guests). Architect, Charles Hollinshed graduated from Sydney University in 1922, one of the first three graduates in architecture in Australia. With A.H. Walkely, Hollinshed practised in Melbourne and the firm specialised in theatre and cinema design. One of their best-known designs was Her Majesty's Theatre, Melbourne (1934). Hollinshed also design Hoyts Limited (with Richard Gailey) the celebrated "Spanish Gothic" Regent Theatre, Brisbane (1929), now demolished.

Creator
Date
November 1929
Place
53 Broadway Avenue, Palmerston North
 
Te Marae-o-Hine, The Square

Te Marae-o-Hine, The Square

These carvings, created by John Bevan Ford and Warren Warbrick were constructed in 1990 to honour the significance of the Maori name for The Square, Te Marae-o-Hine, The Courtyard of the Daughter of Peace. John Bevan Ford, a member of Ngati Raukawa and a well known artist of Palmerston North was commissioned to undertake the work by the Rangitāne Maori Committee and the Palmerston North City Council. The paved courtyard provided a venue for civic gatherings where Maori protocol could be used and the set of nine wooden carvings defined the boundaries of the courtyard. The two large posts shown here contain carvings which face in two directions. The outward carvings welcome visitors to the city by Rangitāne, while the inward carvings depict Te Rongorito and her mother Hineaupounamu, bring their gifts of peace to the civic gathering place which they overlook. The group of three carved posts, shown in this picture symbolise a hope for peace and prosperity. The Square has since been redesigned but the carving and their significance remain.

 
Hoffman brick kiln, Featherston Street

Hoffman brick kiln, Featherston Street

This Hoffman oblong continuous kiln in Palmerston North has not been used since 1959. It is one of the few left in New Zealand and thought to be the only one still in the North Island. It is listed in category 1 under the Historic Places Act 1993. Brick and Pipes Limited, formed 1919, took over this Hoffman kiln from Mr R D Edwards, and in 1929 amalgamated with two other brickmakers, Mr W Mouldey and Trevor Bros. In 1983, Brick and Pipes Ltd ceased trading.

 
The Square

The Square

This photograph shows many mature trees in The Square with a path leading to the Te Awe Awe statue, built 1907, and beyond to the corner of The Square and Fitzherbert Avenue. From the corner of Fitzherbert Avenue can be seen the Fisherman's Table restaurant, FMG tower, Manawatu Standard building, Square Edge, All Saints Church and, across the street, the Grand Hotel.

 
The Square

The Square

Looking across The Square to Arthur Barnett department store. This building was built for C M Ross Co Ltd in 1927-1928. In 1959 it was sold to Milne and Choyce, in 1966 to the D.I.C. which was bought out by Arthur Barnett in 1987. At a time of declining department stores and a new plaza on the other side of The Square, Arthur Barnett vacated the building in 1990. In 1993 the Palmerston North City Council bought the building and renovated it into the new City Library, opened in 1996.

 
Sale of land notice, for Sir James Prendergast's Fitzherbert property

Sale of land notice, for Sir James Prendergast's Fitzherbert property

Plan of Sir James Prendergast's Fitzherbert property, comprising 3743 acres of land in close proximity to the Borough of Palmerston North, to be sold by public auction by Abraham and Williams 31 January 1900. Prendergast owned a large holding directly across the Manawatu River from Palmerston North. The subdivision and sale of this property in 1900 preceded the establishment of Massey Agricultural College, on much of the said land.

 
Post Bank, corner of The Square and Main Street

Post Bank, corner of The Square and Main Street

Looking across part of The Square to PostBank in the former Post Office building. PostBank was the trading name of the Post Office Bank Ltd which was formed in 1987. PostBank was later on sold to ANZ with the PostBank brand being finally redundant by the late 1990s. Beyond can be seen the T & G building clock tower, built in 1937 and standing in Broadway.

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