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Central Normal School Class Photo

Central Normal School Class Photo

A unidentified group of young pupils attending Central School. Central Normal began as Palmerston North's first school in 1872, in Princess Street. It shifted to become Campbell Street School in 1890. When it was outgrown a new school was opened in Featherston Street in 1921 and became known as Central Normal School.

 
Central Normal School Class Photo

Central Normal School Class Photo

A unidentified group of young pupils attending Central School. Central Normal began as Palmerston North's first school in 1872, in Princess Street. It shifted to become Campbell Street School in 1890. When it was outgrown a new school was opened in Featherston Street in 1921 and became known as Central Normal School.

 
Central Normal School Class Photo

Central Normal School Class Photo

A unidentified group of young pupils attending Central School. Central Normal began as Palmerston North's first school in 1872, in Princess Street. It shifted to become Campbell Street School in 1890. When it was outgrown a new school was opened in Featherston Street in 1921 and became known as Central Normal School.

 
Central Normal School Class Photo

Central Normal School Class Photo

A unidentified group of young pupils attending Central School. Central Normal began as Palmerston North's first school in 1872, in Princess Street. It shifted to become Campbell Street School in 1890. When it was outgrown a new school was opened in Featherston Street in 1921 and became known as Central Normal School.

 
Central Normal School Class Photo

Central Normal School Class Photo

A unidentified group of young pupils attending Central School. Central Normal began as Palmerston North's first school in 1872, in Princess Street. It shifted to become Campbell Street School in 1890. When it was outgrown a new school was opened in Featherston Street in 1921 and became known as Central Normal School.

 
Central Normal School Class Photo

Central Normal School Class Photo

A unidentified group of young pupils attending Central School. Central Normal began as Palmerston North's first school in 1872, in Princess Street. It shifted to become Campbell Street School in 1890. When it was outgrown a new school was opened in Featherston Street in 1921 and became known as Central Normal School.

 
Central Normal School Class Photo

Central Normal School Class Photo

A unidentified group of young pupils attending Central School. Central Normal began as Palmerston North's first school in 1872, in Princess Street. It shifted to become Campbell Street School in 1890. When it was outgrown a new school was opened in Featherston Street in 1921 and became known as Central Normal School.

 
Central Normal School Class Photo

Central Normal School Class Photo

A unidentified group of young pupils attending Central School. Central Normal began as Palmerston North's first school in 1872, in Princess Street. It shifted to become Campbell Street School in 1890. When it was outgrown a new school was opened in Featherston Street in 1921 and became known as Central Normal School.

 
Central Normal School Class Photo

Central Normal School Class Photo

A unidentified group of young pupils attending Central School. Central Normal began as Palmerston North's first school in 1872, in Princess Street. It shifted to become Campbell Street School in 1890. When it was outgrown a new school was opened in Featherston Street in 1921 and became known as Central Normal School.

 
Workman, Longburn Freezing Works

Workman, Longburn Freezing Works

A worker procesing sheep intestines which were cleaned and stretched. The Kiwi Bacon Factory, adjacent to the Works, took most of the intestines for casing in the production of sausages. The Longburn Slaughtering and Freezing Company Ltd was established as a farmer's co-operative in 1890. Sited at Longburn, just south of Palmerston North, it later became known as the Longburn Freezing Works. It closed in 1986.

 
Workman, Longburn Freezing Works

Workman, Longburn Freezing Works

A workman stands by what appears to be casings, a by-product of sheep. The Longburn Slaughtering and Freezing Company Ltd was established as a farmer's co-operative in 1890. Sited at Longburn, just south of Palmerston North, it later became known as the Longburn Freezing Works. It closed in 1986.

 
Boxing sheep livers, Longburn Freezing Works

Boxing sheep livers, Longburn Freezing Works

A workman weighing sheeps livers for boxing. The Longburn Slaughtering and Freezing Company Ltd was established as a farmer's co-operative in 1890. Sited at Longburn, just south of Palmerston North, it later became known as the Longburn Freezing Works. It closed in 1986.

 
Barrels, Longburn Freezing Works

Barrels, Longburn Freezing Works

The barrels are labeled "Produce of Longburn New Zealand. XXB Grade 1. Inedible tallow". The Longburn Slaughtering and Freezing Company Ltd was established as a farmer's co-operative in 1890. Sited at Longburn, just south of Palmerston North, it later became known as the Longburn Freezing Works. It closed in 1986.

 
Bagging meat and bone, Longburn Freezing Works

Bagging meat and bone, Longburn Freezing Works

A machine for bagging meat and bone meal, a by product of the works. The Longburn Slaughtering and Freezing Company Ltd was established as a farmer's co-operative in 1890. Sited at Longburn, just south of Palmerston North, it later became known as the Longburn Freezing Works. It closed in 1986.

 
Bag Machine, Longburn Freezing Works

Bag Machine, Longburn Freezing Works

This machine is thought to be stamping muslin for bags that covered the carcasses. The Longburn Slaughtering and Freezing Company Ltd was established as a farmer's co-operative in 1890. Sited at Longburn, just south of Palmerston North, it later became known as the Longburn Freezing Works. It closed in 1986.

 
Young New Zealanders Club for Boys and Girls, Regent Theatre in Pahiatua

Young New Zealanders Club for Boys and Girls, Regent Theatre in Pahiatua

Young New Zealanders Club for Boys and Girls attending the show "The Sea of Grass" at Pahiatua's historic cinema built in 1940. This club was created by Kerridge-Oden, the Auckland Parent Teachers Association and the Department of Education. The aim was to found a National Cinema Club to mould the character of children by instilling into them such “social qualities as thoughtfulness … honesty, sportsmanship, loyalty and pride in their country”, Memories Magazine January 2003. The club ran from 1946 to 1949 with an inaugural membership of 32,000 children. The Regent Theatre was opened on the 23rd of February 1940, with seating for 600 and was closed in February of 1977. Later that year it was acquired by a local drama society and converted to two auditoriums, one for movies and one for live shows, it is still use today [2012].

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