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Stumping with Bullocks, Rowe's Line, Rongotea

Stumping with Bullocks, Rowe's Line, Rongotea

This team of bullocks is stumping Mr C N Rowe's farm on Rowe's Line, Rongotea. The people in the photograph are, from left: Amey Rowe (daughter of William Rowe), Charlie Rowe (son of William Rowe), Charles Morrell Rowe (son of Thomas Rowe), William Rowe (son of C N Rowe), Ted Brogden (bullock driver). The names of the bullocks are Sargeant, Spanker, Snapper, Dandy, Damper, Billy, Tommy, Lyon, Darky and Drummer.

 
Railway Station, The Square

Railway Station, The Square

Walkley's Commercial Hotel can be seen on the left of the photograph. It stood on the corner of Fitzherbert Avenue and The Square. The people are waiting on the train platform at the Railway Station. The Post Office and Telegraph stands next to the station. See 2014P_Rsq5_007688 for a shot of these buildings from behind.

 
Johannes Monrad (1849-1915)

Johannes Monrad (1849-1915)

Johannes, the second son and fourth child of the celebrated Bishop D. G. Monrad, was born in Denmark August 1849 when his father was a Minister in the Danish Cabinet, shortly before he was made Bishop in the Luthran Church. Johannes became a Naval apprentice, but did not flourish in this pursuit. The photograph shows the young man of "artistic tastes" shortly before the Monrad family emigrated to New Zealand. While the family settled at Karere on the Manawatu, Johannes and his older brother Viggo worked on a second property at Patea. Precocious, even for a pioneer New Zealander, Johannes was soon carving out the farm himself and when the Bishop Monrad and his family returned to Denmark, Johannes ran the holding alone, while Viggo took over Karere. After two years he sold the Patea holding and sailed for Denmark in January 1870, marrying Marie Frederiksen there in 1872. After a brief period in America he took up farming in Bunnythorpe from 1878-1883. In 1883 Johannes finally settled in the United States, rising to be a leader in Dairy research and an authority in the dairy industry until his death in 1915.

 
Weslyan Church

Weslyan Church

The Norwegians in Mauriceville were organised by the Methodist minister Edward Nielson, and opened the first church in the Forty Mile Bush on July 9 1881. It cost the community £149 17s. 0d, could hold 120 people it was modeled on Norwegian architecture, especially the tapering, thin, high shingled steeple and cross. Men sat on the right, the women, wearing traditional scarves, on the left. As Scandinavians left the area attendance at the church fell into decline and the Church was eventually closed. The building sits on a hill above North Road, in Mauriceville North and has a Category 1 Historic Places listing. Special services were still being held in 2011.

 
Leary family

Leary family

Richard and Joseph Poulter Leary were prominent businessmen in Palmerston North. They were born in Australia. Joseph came to New Zealand in 1863 and was Palmerston North’s first printer and newspaper proprietor, starting 'The Manawatu Times' in 1875 in partnership with J L Kirkbride. When it was sold, Joseph retained the commercial printing side of the business until he eventually sold it to Mr Keeling. He was a Borough Councillor of Palmerston North 1882-1884. Joseph married a Miss Austin of Foxton and they had a daughter Phoebe . He also married a second time to a Mrs Carty of Wellington. Richard was a chemist and optician, who arrived in Palmerston North in 1875. In the photograph Joseph Leary would appear to be the man standing second from the left, next to Phoebe his daughter seated, second from left. It is unknown where the pohotograph was taken.

 
A View of the Fountain in the Square

A View of the Fountain in the Square

An interesting view of how the fountain in the Square used to look before the addition of the spire from the Coronation Monument (also visible) was added (thus creating the Coronation Fountain). This image is looking across the Square to Church Street East, with Main Street East running across the photo. Visible on the section of The Square between Main Street East and Church Street East are The United Farmers Cooperative Association (this operated from 1895 to 1908), Millar and Giorgi's building (opened in 1902), C.S. Pickering, Bunting Studio and A Turner. Along Church Street is the Club Hotel, W F Durward (drapery), Occidental Hotel (corner of Fitzherbert Avenue and the Square). The Band Rotunda was first built in 1899 and a second larger one (here) was built in 1907).

 
A view of Rangitikei Street from the Square

A view of Rangitikei Street from the Square

This photograph shows a view of Rangitikei Street from the Square and was taken around 1906. The building on the right is the Royal Hotel, which was established in Palmerston North about 1871. Over the years the building was repeatedly enlarged and improved. In 1915, the Bank of New Zealand erected their premises on this site and the licence was transferred to a building further up Rangitikei Street to what had been Dawick's Buffet. The left side of the photograph shows the three-storied brick Clarendon Hotel, which was constructed in 1904, after fire had destroyed the earlier wooden hotel. Mr H Baker was the Proprietor. Further along the street is the Johnston and Sim Land Agents. There is a sign on the building that indicates this is also the location of the offices of Manawatu Racing Club and NZ Government State Fire Insurance. The premises of Barraud and Abrahams is visible further down the street.

 
Mauriceville School Class Photograph

Mauriceville School Class Photograph

The first Mauriceville West School was a tiny slab building constructed by the Scandinavian settlers in 1875, on the Education reserve at the centre of the town. It was replaced in 1877 by a small pit-sawn timber school house and in 1886 by the two-roomed structure shown here, which was used at least until the 1950's. The headmaster shown here is probably Johnson. School attendance was never good at Mauriceville in its early days, when the syllabus was primarily concerned with anglicising the young Scandinavians.

 
Cilius Pedersen and Family

Cilius Pedersen and Family

Cilus [or Celius] Pedersen [or Peterson] was a Scandinavian settler farming in Mauriceville c 1883 – 1891. In 1890 he appears to have been in partnership with Hans M Petersen or Peterson, possibly a relative. This photograph shows the family in front of their homestead in Mauriceville.

 
Portrait of Gunder Gundersen

Portrait of Gunder Gundersen

This photograph of Gundersen is thought to have been taken prior to his migration to New Zealand in 1872-73. The Gundersen family first went to Christchurch before settling in Mauriceville West where Gundersen was the first Postmaster in 1881. Gundersen was one of the seven local farmers who in August 1889 subscribed £20 each to found the Mauriceville Dairy Co. Ltd., which eventually became the source of the town's small-scale prosperity

 
Reverend Mads Christersen

Reverend Mads Christersen

Christensen was born in Egvard, Denmark. He emigrated to New Zealand in 1886, where he was the pastor to the Danish Lutheran Congregation in Mauriceville until 1894, when he took over the Lutheran Church in Palmerston North. He ministered and preached – in Danish until the early 1920s – and built a new church in Church Street. In mid-1928, Christensen retired and was succeeded by his youngest son, the Reverend Ansgar Christensen. Reverend Mads Christersen died on December 28th 1929, leaving ten children and eighteen grandchildren.

 
Reverend George Sass

Reverend George Sass

Sass was the first Danish Lutheran pastor in New Zealand. Originally in charge of the Scandinavian churches in Queensland, he came over to New Zealand to minister to the 7000 or so Lutherans in the Taranaki, Manawatu, Wairarapa and Hawke’s Bay in 1878. He frequently visited the Danish Lutheran congregation at Mauriceville, where a church was opened in August 1884.

 
HMS Pelorus

HMS Pelorus

HMS Pelorus was a 2,330 ton ship launched on 5 February 1857 from the Devonport dockyard, England. In June 1860, as flagship of the Australian Squadron under Captain Frederick Seymour, she participated in the attack on Puketakauere Pā during the First Taranaki War. Later that year, the crew landed at Kairau to support British troops under attack from Maori and in January 1861 a gun crew from the ship helped defend the British redoubt at Huirangi against the Maori. She left the Australia Station in July 1862 for Plymouth. She was decommissioned in 1868 and was broken up for scrap in 1869.