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"Ghost of the Huia" by Paul Dibble

"Ghost of the Huia" by Paul Dibble

Paul Dibble’s _Ghost of the Huia_ sculpture is a tribute to the memory of the extinct huia. A unique native bird, the last confirmed sighting of a live huia was in the Tararua ranges in 1907. The sculpture was created in 2010 and installed the following year by Dibble Art Studio and Zimmerman Art Gallery. The huia is made of bronze, and the base of the sculpture is made from Corten steel.

 
View of Manawatū River from Te Apiti Wind Farm

View of Manawatū River from Te Apiti Wind Farm

Taken from above Ashhurst, looking towards Palmerston North. The bridge seen is the one at the Ashhurst end of Gorge Road. The photograph was taken during a fundraising walk along the route of the new Gorge Road. Construction of the new road begins early 2020.

 
Tokorangi School with Clara Hanron and pupils

Tokorangi School with Clara Hanron and pupils

This image shows Miss Clara Hanron and the pupils of Tokorangi outside their new schoolroom, in 1908. Prior to 1902, the children from Tokorangi went to the two-teacher school at Porewa on the Marton side of the Rangitikei River. They crossed over by the Onepuhi Bridge. However, on 14 June 1902 there was a huge flood and the bridge was damaged beyond repair. The 31 pupils from Tokorangi, from the families of the two marae and several local farmers, were only able to get to school by canoe and this was regarded as too dangerous. Local farmer Mr McCrea offered his barn for a schoolroom, the Board agreed and the headmaster of Porewa School made the trip across each day. It was a dangerous trip for a man not versed in using a paddle and he was swept away and had to swim several times. Subsequently the Board agreed to a school being set up at Tokorangi, in Mr McCrea’s barn. In 1908 the schoolroom was erected on a piece of Native Land donated for the purpose. Miss Hanron was born in India, the eldest of ten children. Her father Michael, born in Ireland, was an engineer/surveyor in the Indian Army and her mother Alice had been trained as a governess. In 1888 they emigrated to New Zealand, as Alice wanted a better life for her daughters. They bought a farm in Stanleybrook, Nelson, and Alice taught at the Upper Stanleybrook School. When they were old enough and as they could afford it, the girls went to Nelson College for Girls and the boys went to Nelson College. They boarded privately to keep costs down. After matriculating, Clara did her teacher training by correspondence, first teaching with her mother and then at a series of small sole charge schools. She was in her thirties by the time she taught at Tokorangi for a year. There she met Tom Green, a local farmer from Stanway, and they were married three years later. They were both very involved in local affairs, especially at Stanway School and the WDFF. Tom was a County Councilor for nearly 20 years and a member of the Hospital Board.

 
Waiata School pupils

Waiata School pupils

Pupils and parents (and possibly some pre-schoolers) at the closing of Waiata School. Waiata School was built in 1894 as Nikau School and was on Taonui Road, near Finnis and Pollack Road turn offs. It closed in 1937. ​

 
Waiata School pupils

Waiata School pupils

Pupils at the closing of the Waiata School. Waiata School was built in 1894 as Nikau School and was on Taonui Road, near Finnis and Pollack Road turn offs. It closed in 1937. All seated (from left)): Marjory Harvey; Barbara Simpson; Frank Short; Pat Fitzwater (seated behind); Bruce McLeod; Sid Weston; Hugh McLeod; Jim Peat. All standing (from left): Unknown; Unknown; Trixie Mulholland; Rose Bailey; Philis Weston; Dawn Harvey; Barbara Bailey; Watson Fitzwater; Joy Fitzwater; Unknown; Unknown (obscured); Ian McLeod; Steve Bailey; Eddie Billett.

 
Waiata School pupils and teacher

Waiata School pupils and teacher

Pupils and their teacher, Miss R Henaghan, at the closing of the school and farewell to Miss Heneghan. Waiata School was built in 1894 as Nikau School and was on Taonui Road, near Finnis and Pollack Road turn offs. It closed in 1937. All seated (from left): Eddie Billett; Jim Peat; Pat Fitzwater (behind); Hugh McLeod; Sid Weston. Second row (from left): Marjory Harvey; Rose Bailey; Dawn Harvey; Barbara Bailey; Joy Fitzwater; Ian McLeod; Steve Bailey Back row (from left): Trixie Mulholland; Philis Weston; Miss Rosie Henaghan (teacher); Watson Fitzwater

 
Home Movie - Kurt and Hilde Gabriel

Home Movie - Kurt and Hilde Gabriel

Movie taken by Kurt Gabriel. Kurt and his wife Hildegard came from Berlin, Germany to Palmerston North in 1938. Hilde was a lawyer (Heidelberg & Zurich Universities) but unable to practise in New Zealand. In the early 1960s she became a teacher of German at Palmerston North Girls' High School. Kurt was a dentist (Berlin University) whose surgery was in the T \_& \_G Building on Broadway from 1938 until shortly before he died. They lived almost their entire New Zealand life at 179 Fitzherbert Avenue. Kurt died 25 May, 1976 aged 79. Hilde died 15 April, 1991 also aged 79. Their two daughters were born in Palmerston North. Both left New Zealand in their 20s. The movie was created by Kurt pre WWII. No cameras were permitted to be in the ownership of refugees during the war. The movie contains footage of: Koputaroa: Koputaroa Railway Station with Hilde and Mr Kilsby, a local dairy farmer; Hilde with an ice cream tray and.Mr & Mrs Kilsby; the Kilsby's dairy farm; the Schenken 'lift' (container) marked Berlin/Wellington. This container had held Hilde and Kurt's European possessions and was given to the Kilsbys for their use as a farm shed; Foxton? Beach with the Kilsbys; Kurt with high hat waving; back to the farm for milking time. The Esplanade, Palmerston North: Cherry Blossom; Hilde & Kurt walking towards the camera; views across the Manawatu River towards Massey College. Palmerston North: Panorama from the roof of the T & G Building; streets, businesses and vehicles around the Square. Awapuni Race Course Race Day. Garden Party at number 18 of unknown street: Hilde with ice creams and (possibly) George Ormond Wilson; Hilde & Kurt with ice creams; Hilde with (possibly)Mesdames Castleberg and Nathan; Hilde with (possibly) Messrs Castleberg and Nathan. Fitzherbert Avenue Palmerston North: Hilde &.Kurt in their first home between Ferguson Street and College Street prior to their purchasing 179 Fitzherbert Avenue in 1940. Length: 16.13 minutes. Sepia and colour segments. No sound.

Creator
Date
circa 1938
Place
Manawatū
 
The Memoirs of Maurice Clark - war years and detention

The Memoirs of Maurice Clark - war years and detention

This extract from Maurice Clark’s memoirs, tells of his reasons for becoming a conscientious objector in World War II, his experiences in the Shannon camps and a brief account of his subsequent career in the insurance industry. Maurice Frederick Clark, the fourth child of William and Grace Clark, was born at Koputaroa, near Levin, on July 26 1910. His early years were spent at Ngaio, Wellington where he was involved in Methodist Church activities. Early in 1929 he got a job in the Royal Insurance Co. He studied insurance subjects by correspondence and qualified by obtaining a diploma in each of the subjects: Fire, Accident and Marine Insurance. Clark was a keen Methodist and joined the Christian Pacifist Society in 1936. In 1942 he appealed against service in the armed forces and on 31 August was sentenced to detention as a military defaulter for the duration of the war. He was confined in different camps - Strathmore in the Central North Island and the Shannon camps Whitaunui and Paiaka. In June 1945, after the end of the war in Europe, he appealed for release and on 23 July this was granted. A few days later he was released from almost three years in detention and returned to Wellington. He was manpowered for a time to the brick industry but when the order was revoked he applied for a job as a marine insurance clerk in 1947and began his lifetime of successful involvement in the insurance industry. Maurice married Thelma Sinclair on 30 September 1936, at Ngaio. They had five children, the last two born after the war in November 1945 and August 1947. Thelma Clark died on 22 September 1977 and Maurice remarried on 18 October 1980. His second wife was Margaret McLauchlan. Maurice Clark died on 17 April 2000. The thumbnail image attached shows Maurice Clark at about 20 years of age.

 
Ngan Poy Chong and his sons Sun Park Ngan and Joy Park Ngan

Ngan Poy Chong and his sons Sun Park Ngan and Joy Park Ngan

Ngan Poy Chong emigrated to New Zealand and settled in Feilding. His two sons, initially raised in China by their grandparents after their mother died, joined him in 1940. Sun Park Ngan, centre of photograph, was 16 and Joy 9 years of age at the time. Sun (1924 - 2018) married Kathleen Joe in 1954 and raised a family in Bulls, retiring to Palmerston North later in life. Throughout most of his working life he ran a fruiterer and greengrocer business. See 2019Pa\_IMCADigitalmaster\_026560 for his obituary.

Creator
Date
circa 1940
Place
Manawatū
 
Golden Gate Milk Bar and staff, Wellington

Golden Gate Milk Bar and staff, Wellington

The Golden Gate Milk Bar was situated at 78 Courtenay Place, Wellington, opposite the St James Theatre. It was owned and operated by Peter Bares 1935-1942. Peter Bares was born in Greece and emigrated to New Zealand in 1930. In 1945 he moved to Palmerston North when he bought the Royale Dutch luncheon and tearooms. From left: Unknown; Kleoniki Ververis, sister of Peter Bares (Panayioti Ververis); Linda Hardy; Shirley Walsh; Loretta ?. Further information can be found on the Bares family and businesses at IMCA A175/381-R.

 
'Gardner's Pool', Karina Terrace

'Gardner's Pool', Karina Terrace

The pool, on Lindsey Gardner's 2 1/2 acre property, was open to children from all parts of Palmerston North, for about 30 years from c1945. Originally it was part of the Kawau Stream which wound its way through the section. The stream was widened, the edges and surrounds bricked, and a mud floor sufficed until c1973, when a concrete floor was added. After the Stream was diverted a bore was sunk for its water. Changing sheds were provided, use was free, and in its heyday up to 200 children might be present. In 1975 the pool was filled in.

 
Palmerston North Civic Award Winners

Palmerston North Civic Award Winners

Mayor Grant Smith pictured with 2019 civic award recipients: (left to right) Grant Smith, Graham Slater, Professor Angie Farrow, Scott Bruce, Valerie Dittmer and Rodney Wong. The annual Civic Awards are the city's highest recognition for voluntary service, honouring those who give up their time to ensure community groups and organisations tick. Graham Slater had a 38 year involvement with Centrepoint Theatre on the Board. He is also strongly involved with Menzshed Manawatū and organises two U3A groups. Professor Angie Farrow is a highly respected teacher, theatre director and producer, playwright and author, who has made a huge contribution to Palmerston North’s profile and reputation as a centre for performance arts. Valerie Dittmer is a committed member of Palmerston North's not-for-profit sector, including initiating the very successful annual event, "Yesterday's Treasures" which raises crucial funds in support of Methodist Social Services programmes. Passionate Rotarians, Scott Bruce and Rodney Wong, were instrumental in bringing the Central Energy Trust Wildbase Recovery to reality. ​ ​

 
Corner of Rangitikei Street and The Square

Corner of Rangitikei Street and The Square

Looking across from The Square to the corner of Rangitikei Street. Central is The Hub, an accommodation block, and opposite (to the right) is the former BNZ building.

Creator
Date
November 7, 2019
Place
Corner of Rangitikei Street and The Square
 
Civic Administration Building

Civic Administration Building

The Palmerston North City Council CAB, that straddles the road between Main Street and The Square. it was opened in 1980 and is an example of Brutalism architecture. The 'rounded' wall in front of the five storeyed building houses Bethany's restaurant and the Council Chamber.

Creator
Date
November 7, 2019
Place
The Square, Palmerston North
 
Clock tower in The Square

Clock tower in The Square

Looking past the bus car parks in The Square to the clock tower. The clock tower was built in 1955, after a donation by Arthur Hopwood, a local businessman. In front of the clock tower can be seen the war memorial erected in 1926. The Square has undergone substantial changes since the clock tower was constructed.

 
Entrance to the Palmerston North central library

Entrance to the Palmerston North central library

This entrance to the City Library is on The Square. The ramp leads up to the main doors into the library on the Mezzanine Floor. The library was opened in 1996, after the conversion of a former department store in a library. It was first built by the C M Ross Co. Ltd (Roscos) in 1927 to 1928. Athfield Architects were the architects for the library renovation.

 
Elm trees in The Square

Elm trees in The Square

These elm trees were planted circa 1900, and are among the oldest trees in The Square of Palmerston North. They lie between Main Street and Broadway.

Creator
Date
November 7, 2019
Place
The Square, Palmerston North
 
Gingko tree and plaque in The Square

Gingko tree and plaque in The Square

This Gingko tree was planted in the Square in 1975, with a plaque that reads: "This tree was planted by the people of Palmerston North on 8 November 1975 to celebrate the inauguration of our campaign to create an ideal society. When 5% of our population are practicing the transcendental meditation techniques of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, crime, sickness and unhappiness will disappear and the age of enlightenment will be established. Jai Guru Dev."

Creator
Date
November 7, 2019
Place
The Square, Palmerston North
 
Elm trees in The Square

Elm trees in The Square

This row of elm trees were said to be planted circa 1900, and are among the oldest trees in The Square of Palmerston North. They lie between Main Street and Broadway.

Creator
Date
November 7, 2019
Place
The Square, Palmerston North
 
Les Miller WWI collection
Postcard back

Les Miller WWI collection

One of a series of postcards and other items related to Les Miller in World War I. Back of postcard says, "From your mother you are always in my thoughts. I trust you are not at the front yet". Not all of those who ended up in First World War convalescent hospitals were wounded. Some, like Les Miller, never made it into battle. Les Miller’s war record on Archway ID RD21375472 shows that he left New Zealand on 23.3.17 on the ‘Ulimaroa’. He was admitted to the ship’s hospital on 27.8.17 suffering from influenza, and went to various convalescent hospitals after his arrival in London. He was returned to New Zealand on the hospital ship ‘Marama’, departing on 19.12.18, having been diagnosed as ‘pthisical’. He was discharged on 26.2.19. Leslie Darke Miller 1894-1981 was born in Apiti, and was the son of Charles and Emily Miller nee London. His father was one of four brothers who emigrated together to New Zealand from Manchester in the 1880s, and who settled in Apiti as part of the Small Farms Settlement there. Les worked on his father’s farm, and is a farmer on his war record, but later electoral rolls describe him as a clerk. He married Isabel Esplin and had one son, Jim. Les lived the rest of his life in Feilding. He went blind in old age and, as a widower, was looked after by his youngest sister Rene until he died in Feilding in 1981. He had two other sisters, Maud and Grace. Les is an example of the more fortunate First World War servicemen who avoided the slaughter of armed combat, but who were able to enjoy the adventure and camaraderie of travel overseas, and care in military hospitals.

 
Les Miller WWI collection
postcard back

Les Miller WWI collection

One of a series of postcards and other items related to Les Miller in World War I. Not all of those who ended up in First World War convalescent hospitals were wounded. Some, like Les Miller, never made it into battle. Les Miller’s war record on Archway ID RD21375472 shows that he left New Zealand on 23.3.17 on the ‘Ulimaroa’. He was admitted to the ship’s hospital on 27.8.17 suffering from influenza, and went to various convalescent hospitals after his arrival in London. He was returned to New Zealand on the hospital ship ‘Marama’, departing on 19.12.18, having been diagnosed as ‘pthisical’. He was discharged on 26.2.19. Leslie Darke Miller 1894-1981 was born in Apiti, and was the son of Charles and Emily Miller nee London. His father was one of four brothers who emigrated together to New Zealand from Manchester in the 1880s, and who settled in Apiti as part of the Small Farms Settlement there. Les worked on his father’s farm, and is a farmer on his war record, but later electoral rolls describe him as a clerk. He married Isabel Esplin and had one son, Jim. Les lived the rest of his life in Feilding. He went blind in old age and, as a widower, was looked after by his youngest sister Rene until he died in Feilding in 1981. He had two other sisters, Maud and Grace. Les is an example of the more fortunate First World War servicemen who avoided the slaughter of armed combat, but who were able to enjoy the adventure and camaraderie of travel overseas, and care in military hospitals.

 
Les and Maud Miller, Les Miller WWI collection

Les and Maud Miller, Les Miller WWI collection

Not all of those who ended up in First World War convalescent hospitals were wounded. Some, like Les Miller, never made it into battle. Les Miller’s war record on Archway ID RD21375472 shows that he left New Zealand on 23.3.17 on the ‘Ulimaroa’. He was admitted to the ship’s hospital on 27.8.17 suffering from influenza, and went to various convalescent hospitals after his arrival in London. He was returned to New Zealand on the hospital ship ‘Marama’, departing on 19.12.18, having been diagnosed as ‘pthisical’. He was discharged on 26.2.19. Leslie Darke Miller 1894-1981 was born in Apiti, and was the son of Charles and Emily Miller nee London. His father was one of four brothers who emigrated together to New Zealand from Manchester in the 1880s, and who settled in Apiti as part of the Small Farms Settlement there. Les worked on his father’s farm, and is a farmer on his war record, but later electoral rolls describe him as a clerk. He married Isabel Esplin and had one son, Jim. Les lived the rest of his life in Feilding. He went blind in old age and, as a widower, was looked after by his youngest sister Rene until he died in Feilding in 1981. He had two other sisters, Maud (pictured with Les) and Grace. Also held on Manawatū Heritage is a letter that Les sent to Maud commenting on conditions and ‘flash’ nurses, and a card sent to Maud by Henry Pawson, who was also from Apiti and who had an ‘understanding’ with her. The family story is that she found him so changed when he returned that she broke off with Henry and instead married Avery Belk, who she considered a more ‘clean-living’ man. Les is an example of the more fortunate First World War servicemen who avoided the slaughter of armed combat, but who were able to enjoy the adventure and camaraderie of travel overseas, and care in military hospitals.

 
Les Miller WWI collection - invitation
Back of invitation

Les Miller WWI collection - invitation

An invitation to admit the bearer to the State Apartments of Windsor Castle, signed by the Lord Chamberlain. It is stamped 9 July 1918. Not all of those who ended up in First World War convalescent hospitals were wounded. Some, like Les Miller, never made it into battle. Les Miller’s war record on Archway ID RD21375472 shows that he left New Zealand on 23.3.17 on the ‘Ulimaroa’. He was admitted to the ship’s hospital on 27.8.17 suffering from influenza, and went to various convalescent hospitals after his arrival in London. He was returned to New Zealand on the hospital ship ‘Marama’, departing on 19.12.18, having been diagnosed as ‘pthisical’. He was discharged on 26.2.19. Leslie Darke Miller 1894-1981 was born in Apiti, and was the son of Charles and Emily Miller nee London. His father was one of four brothers who emigrated together to New Zealand from Manchester in the 1880s, and who settled in Apiti as part of the Small Farms Settlement there. Les worked on his father’s farm, and is a farmer on his war record, but later electoral rolls describe him as a clerk. He married Isabel Esplin and had one son, Jim. Les lived the rest of his life in Feilding. He went blind in old age and, as a widower, was looked after by his youngest sister Rene until he died in Feilding in 1981. He had two other sisters, Maud and Grace. Les is an example of the more fortunate First World War servicemen who avoided the slaughter of armed combat, but who were able to enjoy the adventure and camaraderie of travel overseas, and care in military hospitals.

 
Swimming at the Manawatu River

Swimming at the Manawatu River

A group of friends on a swimming excursion to the Manawatu River, accessed from the end of Albert Street, Palmerston North. From left: Matt Moody; Tom Bainbridge; Ross Greatorex (seated); Dave Greatorex (seated); Margaret Greatorex (later Hansen); Patricia Hayes (later Eaton); Pete Hansen. Also can be seen, David Greatorex’s car.

 
Black Bridge, Kahuterawa

Black Bridge, Kahuterawa

The original Black Bridge was built by Poole and Klein in 1927, due to the tragic drowning of William F Brown, who tried to cross the river in flood after possum trapping. It is now owned by the Palmerston North City Council and the area is known as the Woodpecker Block.

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