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Children of W A George

Children of W A George

Wilberforce Alfred George was a clothier on The Square, Palmerston North, carrying on the business established by his father D M George in 1883. From left: Donald; Errol; Athol; Stuart; Mavis

 
Mavis George on her wedding day

Mavis George on her wedding day

Mavis Marion George (1912-1968), married Edwin Roy Ingram (1906-1997), on 22 June 1940. Mavis was the daughter of Agnes Innes George (née Marshall), (c.1878 -1942) and Wilberforce Alfred George (1867 - 1921), of 56 Linton Street. Edwin was the son of Lilian Lavinia Ingram (née Hook) (c.1881 - 1958) and Edwin Ingram (c.1879 - 1949).

 
Oral Interview - Bruce McKenzie

Oral Interview - Bruce McKenzie

Bruce McKenzie has been a local identity in book selling for many years. He spent 26 years with G H Bennett & Co Ltd on Broadway, Palmerston North, 12 years in publishing sales in Wellington, and in 1996 opened Bruce McKenzie Booksellers, in George Street, Palmerston North, with his daughter Louisa. Interviewed by Leanne Hickman for the Ian Matheson City Archives. LENGTH: 3 hours and 43 minutes ABSTRACT: Part One: Start: Born in 1937. Brought up in Palmerston North first in Park Road in 1930s and 1940s. Went to College Street School. 2:10 Palmerston North in the context of the 1940s. Father’s accountancy firm (SI McKenzie Accountancy) on the top floor of A&P building in Broadway. Manawatu AA was also there. Second or third floor was 2ZA radio. 7:50. Grandparents lived next door in Park Road in a romantic large house with an overgrown tennis court. Playing in a large area. Grandfather set up the Wairarapa Times Age and became owner and editor before moving to Aokautere farming. Records of family at Aokautere School. 12.25. Grandfather Donald McLeod was the Manager of the Municipal Baths and the Opera House. 13.32. Remembered the berms mowed by the Council and using the long grass to make huts and playing causing allergies and asthma. 15:39. Teachers and students at College Street School. Remembering the war years at College Street School. Father went to WW2 and Bruce wrote letters and the family dug a trench in the back yard. Atmosphere of anti-Japanese. Remember Victory posters and had a stall selling fruit and other things to raise money for the troops. Not aware of the danger. First business enterprise. Reported in one of the papers which was a bit deal. (see below: Manawatu Standard, 1 March 1944). 24:40: Mother explained that some of the neighbours were poorer just after the Depression. Family across the road that had an outside toilet and used newspaper as toilet paper. Bruce’s family was in a better situation. 25:17: Went to Palmerston North Intermediate for one year and remembers it as being a great school. Remembers teacher Mary Robertson particularly fondly. Later became a customer and she never seemed to age. 28:33: The family moved house to Russell Street and Bruce biked to Intermediate. He remembers stopping for the railway lights running through town. 30:44: After WW2 father became important in the Employers Association. He was offered a big overseas trip to Geneva and Bruce’s parents went away for 6 months and Bruce went to Hadlow Preparatory School in Masterton in 1949. The school put Bruce back to Form 1 then he was a year behind when he went to Palmerston North Boys’ High. High School was difficult until 6th Form. 38:00: Russell Street house had a beautiful garden with a tennis court and had many upper-class garden parties. Bruce was expected to help with the gardening, but his dad was not a patient teacher. Bruce built cable cars from the house into the trees with Meccano. PART TWO: Start: Struggling in teenage years. Learning the piano and classical music appreciation. 3:40: Identifying as a gay man. 8:10: Went to university in Wellington and studied a BA in English, History and Geography. Rented a room in Kelburn. Joined the drama club at Victoria University and Unity Theatre. Produced a sound play by Samuel Beckett. (a reading of the play with sound effects). 14:11: Second year at university Bruce was in a production of the Taming of the Shrew directed by Pat Evison. Bruce has a small part as a huntsman alongside a young Roger Hall. The two men would become good friends. 17:15: Friend Ian Knowles had a job at the Student Christian Movement Bookshop and also worked at the university café. Gave both jobs to Bruce. Important step as Bruce loved the bookshop even though he did not identify as being Christian. Less enthusiastic about university. But enjoyed the theatre crowd. 25:13: Disappoint that ambition to become a radio announcer did not happen. Became very sick and went back to Palmerston North. Mum told Bruce that Bennett’s Bookshop had a job. Reluctantly agreed. 27:00: Became part of the Education Department at Bennett’s Bookshop – early 1960s. The education department was primary and secondary schools only. Enjoyed the work. 30:00: At 21, Bruce got a copy of Great Expectations to read in the downtime, but never got time to read it after the first chapter and has never finished it. Became friends with Bob McMurray, a theatre director and did some plays. The education department became a meeting place for teachers. 32:15: After about two years, was offered to come downstairs and become part of the book department. PART THREE: Start: Talks about the Bennett founder GH Bennett and the renaming of Broad Street to Broadway. 3:37: When Bruce started, Gordon and Harold Bennett were running the shop. Harold ran the stationary side and Gordon ran the book side. Gave Bruce the job of looking after the religious department and the technical book department. Responsibility of buying Bibles and motor manuals. 5:30: The book department at Bennett’s was large and elaborate which was a feature in other communities in New Zealand. 9:40: Book Nook in Rangitikei Street which Bruce would visit occasionally with a lady called Dorothy. 10:40: Bruce became a key point of contact for publishers in New Zealand such as Penguin, Collins and Random House. Bennett’s were also visited regularly from UK publishers. Felt part of the whole industry. 13:00: Eventually took over the whole book department from Phyllis Pygot. Wanted to diversify the book titles. 15:30: Bennett’s being stalwarts of the Methodist Church. Harold Bennett was a renegade and not a kind person. But they were a grand family and part of a Palmerston North institution and highly respected. However, simple Methodists and the Bennett’s did not spend money except on the shop or the Church. 22:45: GH Bennett had two daughters who married prominent men. They would come to visit occasionally, and Bruce would have to take them to lunch or morning tea because they would make the brothers nervous. 24:20: On of the daughter’s granddaughter is Jo McColl who is the owner of Unity Book in Auckland. Returned a Bennet’s commemorative plaque from the St Pauls Methodist Church to Jo McColl. Bruce received it on her behalf at a ceremony and sent it to her. 27:20: Gordon Bennett had two children: David and Mary. Mary’s husband, David McGregor, was the General Manager of Bennett’s when Bruce was there. He employed Richard Foxley from Ashhurst who became part of Bruce’s staff. They brought religious fundamentalism to the shop and Bruce remembers them burning some of the books. 32.27: Bruce became joint General Manager of the whole shop after David McGregor’s departure. He didn’t feel sufficiently trained in management at the time. 33:40: Gordon Bennett’s second wife, Enid Bennett was a Methodist minister at St Paul’s Church. After Gordon died, she became the controller of his interests. The brothers left the shop to the New Zealand Insurance Company to manage along with Enid Bennett who was part of the Board. This was late 1970s, early ‘80s. 39:00: Difficult period as the Board would not support Bruce’s ambitions for the bookshop. 39:41: In 1984 Bridget Williams an editor of the Oxford University Press New Zealand, offered Bruce a job to be Sales Manager at Allen and Unwin New Zealand and work in Wellington but still live in Palmerston North. Bruce accepted and left Bennett’s Bookshop after 26 years of service. 47:50: Meeting Mina through the Little Theatre. Bob McMurray asked Bruce to be in a production of ‘The Boyfriend.’ Got to know Bob and his wife Bessie and met Mina through them. It was 1963 as they heard the news about JFK’s assassination. Mina had been married to Barry Woods who was a theatre person and photographer. They had two children. Mina and Barry built the house Bruce is in now. They split up. She had a relationship with Jacob Hepi and had two more children. They split up. Bob and Bessie thought Bruce and Mina would get along well. 53:00: Bruce told Mina he was gay and couldn’t continue a relationship. Bruce went away and then a couple of years later they became involved again. He found he could love her and have a relationship with her. They were soulmates and he loved the children. PART FOUR: Start: Thought that a relationship with Mina would work and allow him to be a parent. He was 28-years old. It was an intellectual decision rather than a romantic one, but it worked very well. They went on to have two children of their own. Bruce’s mother was accommodating of suddenly having four instant grandchildren plus two more later. 3:30: Tricky as Mina had done it all before, but Bruce hadn’t. Mina was starting a degree in English at the time. It felt like they were rescuing each other and had similar ambitions, beliefs and interests. 7:20: Gradually, Mina became heavily involved in museum work and became very important to a lot of people outside the family. The eldest son at age 20, has a terrible accident which left him as a tetraplegic which led to very difficult years. 11:06: The next eldest son had two children, but he split up with his partner. The son and the children began to live with Bruce and Mina. Bruce was working in Wellington four days a week for Allen and Unwin. The son went surfing in Wairarapa came back and crashed on the corner of Pahiatua Track and Aokautere and he died. Bruce and Mina kept the children for a while, and they eventually went to their mother in Lower Hutt. 19:00: After bookselling, Bruce wanted to be a publisher but that didn’t happen, continued as a Sales Manager for Allen and Unwin until they were bought out by Collins. Allen and Unwin were the original publishers of Tolkien. 24:00: The Harper Collins representative from Shannon didn’t want the job anymore and Bruce became the Harper Collins rep for about 10 years. Through both Allen and Unwin and Harper Collins Bruce travelled a lot around New Zealand. Mina was a national figure by this time and was involved with Te Papa Museum. 28:30: While on a trip in Auckland, Bruce thought about opening a bookshop in Palmerston North with Dymocks Bookshops who had the rights to a become part of the bookshop in the Palmerston North library. Both Bruce’s parents had died and left some money. Mina agreed which was a surprise. Dymocks eventually faded away and Bruce opened the bookshop on his own. 31:25: Originally wanted a site on the other side of the Square where the library was but bought a lease on George Street and Bruce McKenzie Bookshop opened 15 Dec 1996, where it still is now. 33:50: On 11 March 1997 Mina died after collapsing at the dining table while she was balancing the books for the shop. Had heart issues and was under Mr Campbell McDonald the cardiologist. Community rallied around, particularly the Māori community. Bruce was grief-stricken for a long time. He was always loyal to Mina. 42:00: Setting up an additional educational bookshop across the road on George Street from the original bookshop in about 2006. 46:45: More idealistic than pratical as teachers don’t come to those kinds of bookshops anymore, the books are often sold directly to schools. Therefore worked as a grandparents shop rather than a teachers shop. But the crash of 2008 caused sales to go down. Also had a discount shop in Coleman Mall but had to let both extra shops go. 57:03: Vision for Bruce McKenzie Bookshop at the beginning. Bringing experiences from managment of Bennetts Bookshop. In 1996 Barcodes Solutions had a well-designed specific bookshop system which was one of the most expensive and Bruce is still using it today, 25 years later. Designed shop with Harvey Taylor who worked with Mina at the museum as a designer. 1:02:50: Main intention was to feature the books specifically. A calm look with deep colours so the books shone out. The counter in the middle and not facing the front door so people wouldn’t walk in and have staff looking at them. 1:05.40: Model for the shop was an Australian shop called the Hill of Content in Melbourne. He remembers it being beautiful with dark colours and a feeling of warmth about it. 1:12:03: Took on the shop expecting that the Council will give the bookshop a budget to supply the city library. The city library spent a lot at Bruce McKenzie which was both a good thing and a challenge. The library gradually began to spend elsewhere, which was ok. 1:18:58: Battles with Amazon and the online shops. Challenges of Covid Lockdown. Felt like everything was being handed over to Amazon. However, that didn’t happen and people are coming back to the local bookshop. 1:23:39: Challenge particularly of the Book Depository. They did a deal with the British Post Office that they would have free shipping. Can’t compete with discounted prices and not postage cost.

 
Oral interview - Jill White

Oral interview - Jill White

Jill White grew up in Feilding. Throughout her busy life she has been a nurse, secondary school teacher, Labour Party Member of Parliament and Mayor of Palmerston North. she has also been involved in many community activities. Interviewed by Leanne Hickman for the Ian Matheson City Archives. Length: 3 hours, 28 minutes ABSTRACT: PART 1: Start: Grandmother came from London and grandfather was a New Zealander. They met and married in Pretoria, South Africa. Grandfather (Frank) worked in Pretoria after the Boer War and eventually returned to New Zealand and settled in Auckland. Had 21 children! The story is that the family had cooked some fish on a fire and the youngest two (twins) died of food poisoning. Jill’s father was five or six and was in hospital for some time with food poisoning. 5:40: Father was a builder and moved to Whakatane where he met and married Jill’s mother. Strong Methodists. 7:10: One of Jill’s uncles was a plumber in Feilding which became attractive to Jill’s parents and they moved there. Jill was born in Feilding. 8:20: Long hot summers in Whakatane with grandparents were an important part of childhood. In the 1950s there are two trips that Jill remembers. One was the year of a great railway strike in New Zealand. Meant a long trip to Whakatane with part train journey and bus journey. The other trip was when Jill’s dad was working in Feilding and he had a little truck. He built a canopy for the three little children to sit on the back of the truck and the children waved to everyone all the way to Whakatane. On the way back they punctured the tyre and they rolled but it was a slow roll and no one was hurt. They were just outside a mission station where people came out and gave them a cup of tea and some Maori men came and put the truck right. 18:50: Went to Manchester Street School. It was a good school and Jill loved learning to read. One or two teachers were particularly wonderful. Remembers doing hand embroidery while the teacher, Mrs Lumsden read books like Jason and the Argonauts and loved it when she read The Hobbit. School went to Standard 6 which would be intermediate now. One teacher, Mr Charles was a suburb teacher. He made learning enjoyable. 25.05: Feilding in the late 40s and early 50s. As a child Jill remembers the polio epidemic about 1948. The school was closed down for quite a long time. They weren’t allowed to go to the swimming baths or the movies. They were allowed to play with the other kids in the street (Sandilands Street). 29:30: Lots of book in the house, mother was a great reader. She would read to the children. 30:35: Knew some people later in high school who were badly affected by polio. 31:20: Feilding had two picture theatres. One ran the Young New Zealanders Club. As part of the club you went to the movies. Serials were important such as Zorro. It was a regular Saturday afternoon activity. 33:17: Mother took Jill to the doctor because her feet turned in a bit. The doctor recommended dancing classes which were at the old Drill Hall on a Friday afternoon. Did not enjoy it because everyone else seemed to know what they were doing. Jill wasn’t embarrassed, just bewildered. Was very grateful and the end of the year when dancing class ended and they decided to not continue. However, later it was useful to understand what it was like as a student when you feel like the teacher is talking a foreign language. 38:25: Went to Feilding Agricultural High School in the 1950s. Jill was very happy as her older sister was sent over to Palmerston North Girls High School. Jill had plans to be a doctor and it was decided that Feilding Agricultural High School had a better science programme. Did well at the schoolwork. Not so good at sport which was a focus of the school. Enjoyed debating and house competitions such as learning and reciting poetry. Mostly great teachers. 44:15: Spent a few years learning music from some of the nuns at the convent school for about two years. Learnt the piano but failed advanced preparatory so it did not go so well. But Jill started learning poetry from the nuns which she enjoyed. 51:00: Had a sixth-form quad at high school where the students could have their own space. Remembers a boy who was hanging across a beam in the roof who had crashed through the ceiling. Some of the gear was stored in the roof. The head mistress came out and laughed. Made her seem more human. 55:30: Remembers going to Roscos for morning tea in Palmerston North. Occasionally, would also go to the Astoria Ballroom for dancing in Palmerston North. 57:04: Feilding was a good place to grow up in as the education system did well for Feilding people. Also, lots of activities available including Brownies, Girl Guides and Rangers. Jill was a Brownie, then a Guide and then a Ranger plus a Brownie leader. Helped to develop values and had fun. Met in the Scout Hall and had an occasional dance there. PART 2: Start: Church life and Sunday Schools. An important part of social life including Easter Camps, which were big gatherings of young Methodist people. These were held at the Sunday School buildings in Grey Street Feilding. Particularly enjoyed the singing. Worked as a Sunday School teacher for a while. 5:00: Went to have an interview at Palmerston North hospital to work in the laboratories. Implied she needed to go and get qualifications. Went to university in Wellington with Teacher’s Studentship Bursary and studied Science. Lived at the Baptist Youth Hostel in Wellington. The Teacher’s Studentship provided enough to live on but bound to teaching for a certain length of time. Five years at university. 9:45: Also continued with Brownies in Khandallah. Also, involved with the Methodist Church in Taranaki Street in Wellington. The Baptist Youth Hostel community was an important group, which continued to meet throughout the years. It was a mixed Hostel which resulted in some marriages. 13:50: Moved to Christchurch Teacher’s College for secondary school teaching for one year. Flatted with others who Jill is still in touch with. It was quite social and didn’t take it so seriously. 18:25: Main class was Biology with a bit of Maths and Physics. Best memory was going on a Biology trip up into the hills, opened eyes to the incredible mountain flora in New Zealand. 22:20: Became engaged to a Wellington man so applied for jobs in Wellington and worked at Wellington East Girls College. However, engagement broke off but liked Wellington and flatted in a ‘dreadful old place’ in Wellington with three other girls. Moved flats to a nicer one in Wadestown. 26:45: Wellington East Girls College had high expectations of the staff. Quite stressful but learnt a lot. The other science teachers were very helpful. There for two years. 31:05: Began working at Paeroa College. Flatted with six others. The school was more relaxed and enjoyable. 40:00: In the second year moved houses in Paeroa, next door to a colleague. Became engaged and then un-engaged. 42:25: Became interested in Volunteer Service Abroad. Travelled to Wellington for a course with the VSA. Offered to go to a high school run by a congregational church in Samoa. 47:05: Arrived at Auckland airport to go to Samoa having never been on a plane or in an international airport. Stopped over in Fiji. Others on the plane going to the same school including a couple from Gisborne. 49:20: Magic of arriving in Samoa. Will never forget the drive from airport through the villages, beautiful plants and the lovely outlook to the sea. Arrived at the school and shared a house with two other women. But for the first week Jill stayed with and made wonderful friends with the headmaster and his wife: John and Gretel (she was a nurse) and remained friends with them to today (Gretel had died recently). 52:12: Loved teaching the Samoan young people. They were so mature in many ways and fun. Some of the students were up to 21 years old as they sometimes had to take time off to earn money for their tuition. Some hoped to be ministers. The congregational theological college was right next to the school so some transitioned from one to the other. 53:15: Visited some of the families of the students. They would invite the teachers to a special weekend once a year, sort of equivalent to Christmas. Once you walked out the gate the students became the hosts, and they would be allowed to address the teachers by their first name. 55:27: While in Samoa the Pope came to visit. He was staying at a village that was part way between the airport and the high school. One of the other volunteers had a little Honda 50 scooter. Jill bought it from him and meant they had transport and saw the Pope at a distance. People flocked to see him and it was a real communal experience – even for Methodists. 57:22: Remembered listening to the first landing on the moon in 1969 on the radio. 59:14: Suffered bad migraine and Gretel looked after Jill and had tricks to help ease the symptoms. Saw something in nursing and when she left Samoa started to seriously consider nursing. 1:01:15: First went to Scots College in Wanganui and taught there for a year. Marked contrast with teaching in Samoa. Boys only school. 1:02:07: Decided to leave teaching and applied to go for nursing training at Wellington Hospital. It was at the cusp of when polytechnic courses were opening but there was still hospital-based training which meant earning some money. Until the course started Jill taught for a term at Wellington High School. Had a flat on the hill above Oriental Bay. 1:04:58: Jill was one of the older age nursing students at 30 but it was a good class. Three years training. 1:05:35: Went travelling when she finished the hospital-based training. Had friends who were living in the US in Washington DC. Went there for several weeks. Loved it. Enjoyed the art galleries and the Smithsonian Museum. 1:07:10: Then headed off to Britain to earn some money nursing. Worked in Oxford in a neurosurgery ward in Radcliffe Infirmary. Brilliant team of nurses there and learnt so much. 1:08:46: Went to do a neuro-medical nursing course in Edinburgh. By that time there were some men coming into the nursing but mostly women. Spent time in places such as long-term recovery places for people with permanent disabilities. There was a tendency for young men to wrap their cars around trees, so there was quite a lot of young men. Some who fell and broke their necks. Remembers a young man learning to put on trousers. It was very hard work for him. Some coped well and some struggled to find the strength to put in effort. Some mentored newer arrivals. This was a place just out of Edinburgh in Musselburgh. Had an offer to return to Oxford but decided to return to New Zealand. PART 3: Start: Arrived back in New Zealand. Worked briefly in Auckland Hospital before she decided to try Public Health nursing. Became the Public Health nurse for the Palmerston North district which actually meant Jill ended up nursing in Dannevirke as the district stretched that far. 2:36: Met the wife of one of the doctors who introduced Jill to the Guiding movement in Dannevirke. The wife was also a very knowledgeable bush person and a keen tramper. That led to a few times out tramping in different parts of the country, including the Heaphy Track. Introduced Jill to a great part of life. 4:43: Part of Jill’s job took her out into the country east of Dannevirke. She went out to Norsewood and Ormondville to visit schools for health education work. Enjoyed getting to know the communities, including the policeman at Norsewood. The policeman helped to let her know when an old man got lost wandering the street. Jill was able to get him help in Dannevirke. 7:48: Worked in Dannevirke for a couple of years, then worked in a supervising Public Health job going from the main office in Palmerston North. About 1981 – 1982. Was able to see more of her parents who lived in Foxton. Bought a small house in Palmerston North in Knowles Street. Her brother, a builder, extended the house for her. 9:40: Enjoyed studying again. Had begun some extramural study in Dannevirke on some nursing studies papers. Back in Palmerston North Jill moved her study into History and Sociology. Also entered politics. 10:48: Friends had talked about the Labour Party and what they were doing. Entered local body politics through the ‘80s but became interested in government – politics at the national level. Wasn’t always impressed with what the Labour Party was doing in the 1980s. 11:40: Went and joined the Labour Party the day after they lost the 1990 election. Thought they would be listened by then. A number of people from New Labour had split off so membership had shrunk. 13:15: In the early ‘90s it was obvious there was not going to be great competition for the Labour candidacy in Palmerston North, so Jill put her name forward. Jo Fitzpatrick a Labour staffer came over from Wellington and helped Jill and her husband Bruce get organised for a Labour campaign leading up to the ’93 elections. No one thought she had a chance, but it was funny times. Young people like Hamish McIntyre were feeling at odds with the National Party so he started the Liberals and then joined the Alliance. So, the race became a three-way race, but Jill won by 163 votes. 16:05: Jill and Bruce married in 1992. Met through friends from university days in Palmerston North. PART 4: Start: The Manawatu electorate went to Shannon (says Foxton but it should be Shannon – corrected later). The small team there worked very hard. Big change in life. It became harder to stay involved in local body politics but had enjoyed being on the Palmerston North City Council and the Regional Council. Great experience going down to Parliament. Lived in Wellington with Hamilton MP Diane Yates. 3:20: One of the first issues was the leadership of the Labour Party. Mike Moore had taken over around election time and then there was a lot of interest in Helen Clark coming in as leader, which did happen. 3:45: Interested in the work of the select committees and the relationship between the legislation that occurred and the workings of that out in everyday life. On the Regulations Review Select Committee. Each piece of legislation needed certain regulations to be brought in. 5:05: Jonathan Hunt ran the Regulations Review Select Committee which was a great learning experience to see how legislation could work in everyday life. 6:25: Enjoyed working on things like environment and conservation issues. 6:50: Drove to Wellington from Palmerston North on a Tuesday morning as the Labour caucus met on a Tuesday morning and spent three day on Parliamentary committees. Sometimes went home on a Thursday evening but was soon on a select committee that met on a Friday morning, so would not get back to Palmerston North till Friday afternoon. 8:25: The Friday morning committee was Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Committee which was chaired by Nick Smith and also Rob Storey was the other Labour Party person. Nick Smith led it well and only had four on the committee. 10:13: Opportunity came for two Labour Party and two National Party people to go to Antarctica for two or three days. Saw history such as the old huts and old materials. Went to various spots around Scots Base and sitting on the ice and all of a sudden Emperor Penguin arrived. Also saw areas where they were working on scientific projects. Went out beyond Scots Base to where there was a hole in the ice and saw a seal poke its head out. 14:15: Also work at home with the Labour Party and the help from the local community. Such as lending a caravan while campaigning. 15:15: Main memory is always being busy and it was always interesting at the beginning of Helen Clark’s government. Being List MP was harder after 1996. The Manawatu electorate disappeared and became Palmerston North and Rangitikei. Shannon became part of Otaki electorate which was a shame as the people had been so good to Jill. 20:44: Jill set herself up to keep an eye on the Rangitikei Electorate. Quite like Dennis Marshall and Jill added a Labour voice. Set up an office in Feilding. Would later go with Dennis to Africa as part of a Commonwealth Observers team. 22:35: 1998 Jill thought she liked being an electorate MP rather than a list MP and stood for the Palmerston North mayoralty. Chose not to talk about that at this time. 25:55: After mayoralty came back onto the regional council for a while. Began to have time at the university, finishing BA that she had started back in the 1980s. Became a regular student. Also completed a MA. Began to write articles for the Manawatu Journal of History. 28:22: Involvement with the demolition of the old St Pauls Methodist Church. Wanted to make sure that the treasures were not lost. Also, husband Bruce wanted to make sure that a good process was followed in the demolition. Helped to care for the plaques – some went to the families. Preserved the stained glass windows at Te Manawa that were linked to Cunninghame (from Collinson and Cunninghame) and the Bennetts (from Bennetts Bookshop). Both had been stalwart members of the Methodist Church but they have strong connections to the business history of Palmerston North. 31:52: Two smaller windows from the Church were newer technique and one was a memorial the first settlers/the first ship who came to Palmerston North and the other was a memorial to the craftsmen of the Church. They are stored at Wesley Church as they very much belong to the Church. 33:32: When the Church was built in 1911 in one of the pillars a time capsule was placed. However, it was punctured, and water got in. There were some coins, Church history information. But it was very wet. Got a phone call from ‘Guardians’ of the Church to tell Jill that the capsules were going to be removed and if she was interested, she should come. 35:11: There was no official to accept the capsule, so Jill was handed it, dripping wet. She was so thrilled. Took the capsule to Geoff at the museum and a conservator opened it. The coins were there but the papers were sodden. An envelope that had been opened was in there. There was a story that the night the capsule was put into the pillar that some lads had possibly taken some things out. But no one knows. 38:35: Just retired as a member of the Heritage Trust group in Palmerston North. 40:25: Possesses records that possibly should go to archives including records of the 2004 floods in the Horizons Region. The local authorities set up a committee to look at needs and allocate resources that came in for relief. Jill became Chair of that committee. There was a person from Foxton, two Palmerston North councillors: Wanna Davis and one other. Also, people from further parts of the region. Had a good look at affected areas, received information from a lot of sources. Jill has records from that time. 43:10: Also has some records from the knitware factory which she has written articles about. When the Manawatu Knitting Mills moved from the old building in Main Street to Bennett Street and Jill was able to have a look around the old building and in the office was a pile of papers dating back to an old share book from 1920s or ‘30s through to letters and a big 1958 pile and fliers. Jill took a pile of stuff and still has them and needs to talk to John Hughes about putting them in the archives. 48:45: Now part of the Museum Society. Had been part of the Museum Society many years ago. Interested in working with people like Fiona McKergow and Anna Weatherstone (secretary). 51:30: Enjoys her garden which is now small and manageable.

 
Arnie Evans, life as a regional radio and TV reporter part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Arnie Evans, life as a regional radio and TV reporter part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio, 17th March 2020. Arnie Evans, life as a regional radio and TV reporter, part 2 of 3. Broadcasting facilities, 1970s and 1980s. Use of phones. Comparison with TV. TV more costly and more prescribed. Mistake with captions. Reporting a riot at Lake Alice. Maori language reporting. Interesting people. Video Dispatch and Eyewitness News. Wide range of stories.

Creator
Date
March 17, 2020
Place
Palmerston North
 
Arnie Evans, life as a regional radio and TV reporter part 3 - Manawatu Conversations

Arnie Evans, life as a regional radio and TV reporter part 3 - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio, 24th March 2020. Arnie Evans, life as a regional radio and TV reporter part 3 of 3. Broadcasting in the 80s. Freezing works and other closures, maternity hospitals, factories (caravans). Other stories, jetboats, water skiing. 1985, shift from film to electronic news gathering. Move to “infotainment”, loss of regional news, focus on national and global news. Is there “useful” news? UK and US responses to changing environment. Confrontational reporting.

Creator
Date
March 24, 2020
Place
Palmerston North
 
Garry O'Neill part 2, career in teaching - Manawatu Conversations

Garry O'Neill part 2, career in teaching - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio, 28th April 2020.  Part 2 of 2. Teacher training in Christchurch from 1951. Catholic Youth Movement. Teaching at Hokowhitu, then Marton Junction (51 children in the class). Then to Terrace End. Other activities. Married. Sole teacher in 1961. Other schools, Lions. Settling in to communities. Limited resources. School libraries. School buses. Principal of Our Lady of Lourdes from 1975. Integration of Catholic schools into the State sector. Catholic teacher training. Left teaching before Tomorrow’s Schools. 

Creator
Date
April 28, 2020
 
Tom Romley, Part 1 of 5, Ashhurst childhood - Manawatu Conversations

Tom Romley, Part 1 of 5, Ashhurst childhood - Manawatu Conversations

 Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio, 2nd June 2020. Tom Romley, Part 1 of 5.  Born 1934. Only child. 1938 moved to Ashhurst. Other family in the area. Wood range in the kitchen, open fire in the lounge. Outdoor toilets. Started school in 1940. There by Shetland pony. Discipline in school, the strap. Palmerston North Boys High, 1 year by bus, then a boarder. Went for an apprenticeship as an engine smith at 15 so could leave school.  

Creator
Date
June 2, 2020
Place
Ashhurst
 
Tom Romley Part 2 of 5, 1940s and 50s Ashhurst - Manawatu Conversations

Tom Romley Part 2 of 5, 1940s and 50s Ashhurst - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio, 9th June 2020. Tom and Colleen Romley, Part 2 of 5.  Leisure activities. Soccer. Learning to swim in the river. Diving off the bridge. Dentists. Sunday School. Pocket money as a boarder. Cinema. Scouts. Military training at Waiouru, Valentine tanks. Cycling between PN and Ashhurst. Radio – why Colleen was called “Compost”. Few books. Weekly dances, letting a mouse loose. Flower shows. Range of stores in Ashhurst in 1940s and 50s. Brethren community. Many English assisted immigrants. Poms and English. 

Creator
Date
June 9, 2020
Place
Ashhurst
 
Tom Romley Part 3 of 5, fitter-welder 50s - Manawatu Conversations

Tom Romley Part 3 of 5, fitter-welder 50s - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 16th June 2020. Tom and Colleen Romley, Part 3 of 5.  Apprenticeship as a fitter-welder in early 1950s. Making horse shoes. Wagon wheels, forge welding. Training at PN Tech. Driving test. 5 year apprenticeship. Building structures, woolsheds, etc.. Going to Australia, Melbourne working in the docks (unions, strike), then glass manufacturers, having a tradesman’s assistant (foreigners). Snowy River dam scheme working underground, living in a camp, shift work (dinner at 7am). 

Creator
Date
June 16, 2020
Place
Ashhurst
 
Tom Romley Part 4 of 5, Engineering business, Ashhurst - Manawatu Conversations

Tom Romley Part 4 of 5, Engineering business, Ashhurst - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio, 23rd June 2020. Tom Romley, Part 4 of 5.  Working on the Upper Yarra Dam, living in a camp. Sleeping bags, dead snake inside. Shift work. 2 “lives” and you were out. How got to Australia. Workers from many countries. A stay in Melbourne, Chloe painting in Young and Jackson’s Hotel. Motorbike for touring. Back to NZ after 7 months for 21st birthday. Met Colleen, future wife so stayed in NZ. Engineering in Ashhurst. Working where had been an apprentice. Business growing, designing and erecting woolsheds, etc.. Working away from home on construction in early years of marriage. Old cottage. Earthquake standards. Workplace safety (1950s). Staircase in the Art Gallery, steel framed house. Bought the business in 1973. 

Creator
Date
June 23, 2020
Place
Ashhurst
 
Tom Romley Part 5 of 5, Engineering business and museum, Ashhurst - Manawatu Conversations

Tom Romley Part 5 of 5, Engineering business and museum, Ashhurst - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio, 30th June 2020. Tom Romley Part 5 of 5.  Buying Ashhurst Engineering. Colleen in the office, children in a caravan. Running the business. Early issues. Hardware shop also. Switch to metric measures from Imperial. Advantages of having a shop, packaging. Garden furniture. Sold business after 15 years due to health problems. Working for Hugh Akers for 17 more years, machinery maintenance, etc., then in the Akers family museum (private). Description of the museum. Problem with a farmer’s well. 

Creator
Date
June 30, 2020
Place
Ashhurst
 
Flooding at 364 Albert Street

Flooding at 364 Albert Street

Flooding at Richmond Escolme Harrison's residence in Albert Street. R E Harrison was a nurseryman of Hokowhitu, Palmerston North, and after the flood the family was never return to this home. the house is now the Village Inn in Hokowhitu. In May 1941 the Manawatu River flooded about 250 hectares of the city. A stop bank between Fitzroy Street and Jickell Street had been constructed but it proved inadequate for the flood waters.

 
Flooding at 375 Albert Street

Flooding at 375 Albert Street

375 Albert Street, Palmeston North, stood approximately opposite what is now the Hokowhitu shopping centre. In May 1941 the Manawatu River flooded about 250 hectares of the city. A stop bank between Fitzroy Street and Jickell Street had been constructed but it proved inadequate.

 
Oral Interview - Joe Hollander Part 1

Oral Interview - Joe Hollander Part 1

Joe Hollander has over 40 years experience in building and construction, engineering, design, planning and development, operations, logistics and deployment management and governance, management and mentoring in New Zealand and overseas, within the NZ Defence Force (NZDF - Regular Army/Corps of Royal NZ Engineers - 1969-1991), Electricity Corporation of New Zealand (ECNZ - Marketing -1991-1993), Massey University (1993-2008), the wider building and construction sector and allied professional and community organisations. Interviewed by Leanne Hickman for the Ian Matheson City Archives. Length: 1 hour, 44 minutes. ABSTRACT: Start: Early education and interest in engineering such as water, drainage and building. Grew up in Christchurch and went to Christchurch Boys High School, Christchurch Polytechnic and at Canterbury University studying earth sciences and engineering along with a Diploma of Management. 1:45: In the late ‘60s Joe was conscripted for National Service, which interrupted formal education but was able to continue later. After the Second World War there was a process of Compulsory Military Training and that continued into the ’60 when it changed to National Service by ballot rather than compulsory. On the 21st birthday the marble went into a box and if you were chosen you were conscripted. After psychiatric tests and aptitude tests the military identified what path people would follow and which corps people would end up in. At that time, it was only Army. 4:30: Early military training. In high school they had School Cadets and many teachers were ex-WW2 veterans, which had an impact. In the first few weeks of the New Year were ‘barrack weeks’ in high school. At senior high school they could go through the ranks, Joe was a corporal then a sergeant. Was sent to a Warrant Officers course in Papakura which was an experience for a teenager. He returned as the training Warrant Officer for the school battalion. During school holidays could pick up an instructional job out at Burnham and was paid pocket money. 7:19: Before Joe left high school the Army was recruiting, and a number of the regular Army individuals tried to convince them to sign up for the regular forces. But Joe wanted to get into work experience. 8:32: After being conscripted, reported to King Edward Barracks in Christchurch. Would be away from home for about three months. The firm Joe had been working for had gone bust, so being conscripted was good timing. Although it interrupted education Joe was ready for adventure. Happy to join the Territorial force and serve for another three years. 9:50: Basic training in Burnham. Drill, field craft, weapon training. Initially put down as going into the Royal New Zealand Engineers as a storeman. Was put on an officer selection board and went away for a week to do other testing. Was then sent from Burnham to Waiouru. 11:36: Spent six weeks at Waiouru on an officer training course. Then went to Linton to the School of Military Engineering to do a basic combat engineering course. Learnt about bridging, demolition, mine warfare, watermanship. Back to Waiouru to finish officer training and then returned to home, now 1970. 12:54: Posted as the Troop Commander for the Dunedin Troop the 3 Independent Field Squadron, which was based out of Christchurch. Began working almost full-time in the headquarters as a Training Officer. Operating out of Addington Barracks. Interesting, varied work. 14:55: Engaged in a number of projects along with local authorities. For example, surveying a new drive for Cracroft House in Christchurch for the Guides Association as a community project. Lots of little practical projects and also running training weekends in Dunedin such as boating, watermanship of the Otago Peninsula or mine warfare in the paddocks. Fun because it was varied. 16:14: Eventually signed up for the Regular Force. A bit complicated because they weren’t transferring territorial commissions to regular commissions. Went back Waiouru on the Officer Cadet Training Unit and continued doing the Officer Training. 17:17: Went back to Linton to do more advanced Engineer training in specific subject areas. In his early 20s at that stage. Became a 4-star advanced Engineer instructor. Began looking after National Service in Linton. Worked between Waiouru and Linton doing courses. 20:00: In late ’71 Joe was recommissioned and then posted as Training Officer to Petone to 6 Independent Field Squadron. Army going through reorganisation at that time. A lot of the units were re-rolled into different functions such as Engineers changing from a construction focus to a field focus. At Petone until early 1973. Had a goat mascot named Truby King who ate everything. 23:15: Posted to 1 Construction Squadron in Papakura. The Squadron was being changed to a field squadron. Transitioned to a combat engineering role rather and a construction role. Training Officer and the Liaison and Reconnaissance Officer. Stayed with them until 1976. 24:30: Also required to continue training themselves. Training across five streams: basic all-arms training; corps stream – combat or military engineering; instructional stream, became more specialised; officer stream, including administration staff work; professional stream, opportunity where Joe did professional engineering through the US Army Corps of Engineers in State in Fort Belvoir which was just south of Washington at that time. Correspondence initially and then went over to do advanced course. Then went to Virginia Tech University which gave professional engineering status. Rare for someone outside of the States to end up with professional engineering registration. 30:42: 1976 ended up in command of 1 Field Squadron and then was posted to Wellington to Defence Headquarters. A bit of a shock to go from a field unit to a desk job in the Defence Works. Looked after the infrastructure and the camps and bases. Good opportunity to make connections with higher command. Projects such as new barrack construction and mechanical engineering projects such as a medium temperature hot water system throughout Waiouru. New facilities at Papakura Camp which was built on a swamp. During the three years there was able to see some project through to the end. 34:03: Spent several months on secondment with the Australian Army in 1978. In 1979 went on secondment with the Royal Engineers in Germany. Involved in NATO exercises. With the Australian Army, was stationed in Townsville with the 3 Taskforce – the Ready Reaction Force. Attached to a Field Squadron who were on exercise. Also, joined a Diving Survey Team from Innisfail up to Cairns. 36:45: On secondment with the Royal Engineers. Possibly first kiwi posted to a Divisional Headquarters. Based in Lubeka in the North Rhine Germany with the Second Armoured Division Headquarters in the Engineers Division. Had a major NATO exercise where they put 165 000 troops in the field. Joe was responsible for Engineer logistics. Several months preparation, ran the exercise for a month and then the aftermath such as engineer assessments of damage caused by the exercise. 40:25: Also attached to an Engineer Unit in Berlin for a time. Then the Swedish Engineers asked for assistance and went to the Swedish Engineers School. Also, the representative for the various Engineer Regiments for the UK. Often back in UK on training conferences. 41:15. First met the Queen through work and the Engineer Training Brigade who came to visit in 1979 in England. Also escorted the Queen in 1990 as her Escort Officer. 43:20: Had some difficulty coming home due to conflict in Rhodesia in 1979. All the RAF were tied up so took a long time to get back to New Zealand. 43:50: Posted to Army Headquarters into the Chief Engineers Office as Staff Officer – Engineers in Wellington. Responsible for doctrine and Engineer equipment. 45:30: Also supervised the rebuild of Scots Base in Antarctica, which was an Engineer project. Engineers had been there in 1956-7 for the building of Scots Base, and then again 30 years later to replace Scots Base. 47:20: Posted as Force Engineer – South East Asia to Singapore with the family. Officer commanding the New Zealand Works Services Unit. Tri-service so had Navy and Airforce people amongst the staff plus 300 locally employed civilians. Responsible for all the Defence assets on the northern end of Singapore. Also had some responsibility for Foreign Affairs/Embassy stuff from Hong Kong down to Indonesia. Sometimes lectured at the Malaysian School of Engineering. There for 2 and a bit years: 1982-84. 49:42: Posted to Takapuna to Land Force Headquarters in Byron Ave as a Senior Planner and the Engineer Staff Officer for the Force Engineer Southwest Pacific. Meant he had responsibility right across the Pacific for Humanitarian Aid and Disaster Relief. Engaged with Pacific Island to discuss needs for infrastructure assistance. Did that for a couple of years. 51:03: Posted to Linton to the School of Engineering as Principal. Staff of 70 plus and 400 students including from the Pacific Islands. Nowadays about a third of the staff size. Did that for three years and then spent several months in Gisborne/East Coast during Cyclone Bola in 1988. 52:13: Posted to town to the Defence Headquarters that used to be in Main Street, Palmerston North. Support Command Headquarters. Became the Principal Staff Officer for Personnel and Logistics but also did operations and plans. 1990 became Commanding Officer of the Headquarters and Director of Army Land Works and Engineering. 54:03: While Joe was at Takapuna Land Force Headquarters, he commanded the contingent that went into Samoa in 1985, which was the first time since 1929 that New Zealand had gone into Samoa. A lot of aid work: built wells, rebuilt the hospital, sorted the cemeteries. Had a medical and dental team working in the villages. Also, a large Airforce contingent to give mobility. 56:50: Worked on a harbour project in Atiu in the Cook Island in ’74-75 for about five or six months building a harbour. Farmed pineapples but needed to get goods out to a ship. Blasted a harbour in the reef. 1:02:01: Opportunities to work with Airforce and Navy such as in Petone exercised with the HMNZS Alfort which was the Naval Volunteer Reserve Unit in Wellington and go across Cook Strait to the Queen Charlotte Sounds for exercises. 1:04:45: Building projects such as the Officer’s Mess in Waiouru. Projects could take a long time from conception to fruition. 1:05:19: In Singapore, New Zealand had responsibility for the Base. A few thousand people living there. Including the Naval Base. Responsible for refuelling and resupplying, power supply and water supply. A lot of that is gone now. 1:06:58: Cyclone Bola on the East Coast in March 1988. Joe got a call from Support Command Headquarters in Main Street to say that a Defence Coordinator would be needed to support Civil Defence on the East Coast. From memory about 1022 mm of rain in 36 hours. By Wednesday Joe was called to go with Ricki Lucas in a helicopter to Gisborne. Doors off chopper and had to flow ‘nap of the earth’, very close to the ground through gale winds. 1:11:37: Lived under his desk for about two weeks. Established a major logistic base in the Drill Hall for all of the supplies e.g. bottled water, nappies, sanitary pads, bread, blankets etc. The whole Drill Hall was packed. Loaded up supplied into trucks to get them to people on the coast when they could get through the roads. Civil Defence Headquarters across the road and developed a good operation established. Engineer required for roads, bridges, problems with industries like Watties, McWilliams, the vineyards, Sidenco, one of the big fisheries. They had no water, problems with silt. The main water pipe had been destroyed. Engineers established water solutions, such as getting water into milk cartons for distribution. Problems at Gisborne airport with damage. 1:17:15: Massive land slips/erosion and scars in the hills after the cyclone. Ground was like a moonscape with the grass wiped out, new water courses. 1:17:55: End of the disaster phase and Cook Country Council asked if the Engineers could help with opening up the roads and re-establishing the water supply into the water catchment area. In addition, activity in Wairoa as the bridge had gone. Reconstruction phase took about three months. Camped at Waikanae Beach. So were there from Day 3 right to the end of reconstruction. 1:20:25: While working in Wellington in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s for Defence Works there was a bit push for energy efficiency and sustainability. One of the hats that Joe wore as the Defence Energy Engineer responsible for energy efficiency in Defence. In 1990 Joe was invited as part of a UN delegation to go to the Soviet Union. Other delegates pulled out due to the Gulf War and ended up being Joe and four Americans. They spent four months in the Soviet Union. 1:22:27: Initial briefings in New York and then additional briefings in Moscow, in the Kremlin in their major energy control set up. Was attached to Institute for High Temperatures in Moscow. Went to Volgograd (previously Stalingrad). All energy based, looking at energy for such a large country. Including a huge hydro-station and thermal power stations and a nuclear power station on the outskirts of St Petersburg. 1:29:29: Engineer History. Took 39 years to get the history written and raise the $250 000 needed for the project. Covered all the oral history interviews and the research Peter Cooke did. Museum opened in January 1982. Sent Peter to the UK as there were gaps in New Zealand archives. He was able to fill those gaps. Book called ‘_One by the spade_’. 1:33:50: Lived/worked on just about all the New Zealand military bases. Lists almost all of them. 1:37:25: Starting at Linton, the only new thing was the water tower the rest was still from the 1942/3 mobilisation camp. A lot of the tents had been converted to huts. Had to run to the loo through sheep. Operation Kupe in the 1980s, return of battalion from Singapore and had to accommodate them at Linton with building work. Interesting to see development over a 50-year period. 1:40:00: Remembers nightlife in Palmerston North and some of the trouble they got up to.

 
College Court Bookshop Ltd notepad
College Court Bookshop Ltd notepad

College Court Bookshop Ltd notepad

The cover of a 'give-away' notepad from Morrisons Pharmacy, 96 College Street, Palmerston North. At this period of time it was owned by Bev and Laurie Wolfsbauer.

 
Morrisons Pharmacy notepad
Morrisons Pharmacy notepad

Morrisons Pharmacy notepad

The cover of a 'give-away' notepad from Morrisons Pharmacy, 96 College Street, Palmerston North. At this period of time it was owned by Bill Morrison, and John Morrison.

 
Morrisons Pharmacy notepad

Morrisons Pharmacy notepad

The cover of a 'give-away' notepad from Morrisons Pharmacy, 96 College Street, Palmerston North. At this period of time it also served as a Lotto Shop. Morrisons Pharmacy was owned by Bill Morrison, John Morrison and Lynda Hull.

 
Secondary Schools' History Prize winners 2013

Secondary Schools' History Prize winners 2013

Year 12 and 13 winners of the Palmerston North Secondary Schools History Prize in 2013. Submitted work must use local archives in their research. The prizes were awarded at the opening of Local History Week, 4 November 2013, held in the Palmerston North Central Library From Left: Angela Povey, teacher, Awatapu College; Malma Igatia, Awatapu College, Year 12 and overall winner; Geoff Watson, Senior lecturer, Massey University, and representative for the Heritage Trust; Rosie Simmons, Freyberg High School, Year 13 winner; Pene Wills, teacher, Freyberg High School ​ ​ ​

Creator
Date
November 4, 2013
Place
4 The Square, Palmerston North
 
ANZAC Day 2015 - Memorial Crosses

ANZAC Day 2015 - Memorial Crosses

ANZAC Day Memorial Crosses which were set up in The Square for the 2015 ceremonies. Each cross represented the name of an individual upon the Cenotaph, with 507 installed altogether. The 2015 ceremony, marking the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, was one of the largest held to date.

 
Peace Action Manawatū - Protestors with signs

Peace Action Manawatū - Protestors with signs

Protestors with signs at the start of the Peace Action Manawatū Protest in The Square against the New Zealand Defence, Industry & National Security Forum. The forum was held from 31 October to 1 November at Central Energy Trust Arena.

 
ANZAC Day quilt

ANZAC Day quilt

This ANZAC Day quilt was created by staff and customers of the Palmerston North City Library in 2017. Each year it is hung in the library around the ANZAC Day time period.

 
Memorial Gateway at Kelvin Grove Cemetery

Memorial Gateway at Kelvin Grove Cemetery

Gates to the Kelvin Grove Services Cemetery, commemorating World War One and World War Two. Kelvin Grove Cemetery, at 118 James Line, Kelvin Grove, is Palmerston North's main cemetery, providing cremation and burial services to the city and its surrounding districts. It is set on 36 hectares of land, 7 kilometres from the central business district. It has a chapel that can be hired for memorial and committal services and a memorial garden. The cemetery was opened in 1927 to replace the old Terrace End Cemetery on Napier Road. The crematorium and chapel were added in 1954, and a gas-fired cremator was installed in 2003.

 
Poppy Places article - Anzac Park

Poppy Places article - Anzac Park

The New Zealand Poppy Places Trust has been established to develop, promote, and oversee a nation-wide project to commemorate and recognise as part of the heritage of New Zealanders, the participation of New Zealand in military conflicts and military operational services overseas. Poppy Places website.

 
Dr. Doris Adeyinka

Dr. Doris Adeyinka

One of the images in the photographic exhibition "Belonging [Hononga] [Pertencimento]". _"My name is Doris Adeyinka and am originally from Nigeria (West Africa). We moved with my family to New Zealand in January 2007 (15years). I came to New Zealand with student visa to study for my doctoral degree in Veterinary Science at Massey University, Palmerston North and graduated in 2013._ _Initially, I came with four kids within the ages of 12 – 5 years old without knowing anyone except my supervisor who promised to pick me up from the airport. My supervisor (Richard Laven) brought the Massey University van to pick us up and took us to a motel which I thought we had booked but did not go through. He was kind enough to look for another motel we could stay which took more than 2 hours to settle for the night. This made me question if I had taken the right decision of coming with young kids to study without knowing what I was getting myself into. That soon changed when I went to church right next to the Motel on Sunday and everyone welcomed us and visited us after the service. I got a lot of help from my ‘Kiwi Mums and dad’ about schools for the children and donated furniture and a car I can use before buying mine. Massey University international office played a vital role in settling into the community, which made me feel like home._ _As a migrant, my kids were bullied at first, and was difficult to make friends but as soon as i told some of their teachers, that was well addressed. My husband could not get a job in his field of expertise (Animal breeding and genetics). Also, as a doctoral students, I got involved with helping in science labs for undergraduate students and they would not ask any question as they thought I would not know the answers. I soon gained their confidence and made friends with them._ _Despite these challenges, we applied for residency and eventually got citizenship. We love New Zealand and this is home for me and my family."_ "The exhibition reflects on the personal experience of the photographer, Aline Frey, as a migrant woman who chose Palmerston North as a new home for her family and herself. "Belonging" is a series of 10 portraits celebrating migrant women who made Palmy their new home. By allowing characters to share their narratives as they open their hearts to spectators, the exhibition focuses on a multiplicity of ethnicities and biographies. It follows migrant stories while giving a nuanced portrayal of the city's ethnic and cultural diversity. Above all, the exhibition aims to give visibility to migrants' diverse roles in PN society, as attendees can learn and better understand the challenges and achievements of each person's journey. Attendees are also invited to reflect back on their own whakapapa and family memories while making connections and recognising the city’s multicultural formation. The exhibition was organised by Palmeirinhos – Brazilian Heritage Group. All events organised by Palmeirinhos are open to the general public and have been attended by many members of different communities, as well as local kiwis. These Palmeirinhos events have been giving Brazilian children a sense of belonging to the new land that their parents chose to call home. Those children are learning to be proud of who they are and at the same time learning to respect and accept the cultural differences of this very diverse city.

 
Ernst West and Lynn Fielding on horseback

Ernst West and Lynn Fielding on horseback

Ernst West (left) with James (known as Lynn) Fielding, on horseback in the backyard of 11 Victoria Avenue. When the house was removed to make way for the offices of the Horizons Regional Council, the upper two levels were transported to a lifestyle block outside of Ashhurst. The ground level double cavity brick walls were demolished. Ernst Vilhelm West (c1886 - 1961) was a Palmerston North architect and served as a City Councillor 1921-1925.

 
Festival of Cultures World Fair Day

Festival of Cultures World Fair Day

Festival of Cultures week is Palmerston North City's biggest event celebrating the rich cultural diversity of our City. It is an annual event organised by Palmerston North City Council and MMC. The week has a series of events including The Festival of Cultures - World Fair Day, Parade of Cultures (Costume Parade), Lantern Parade/ Carnavale, Teas and Coffees of the World and various workshops/ seminars. Photograph of the Palmerston North City Library information stand at the Festival of Cultures in The Square, utilising he mobile library bus.

 
Peter Thomson at this Motorcycle Museum

Peter Thomson at this Motorcycle Museum

Peter Thomson with Steve McQueen's leather motorcycle trousers. Peter Thomson developed his own museum from his collection of motorcycles, at 1154 Rongotea Road Kairanga. It has over 100 motorcycles on display, dating from 1904 to present day, as well as motorcycling memorabilia, brochures, motor cycle magazines, parts and workshop manuals.

 
Peter Thomson at his Motorcycle Museum

Peter Thomson at his Motorcycle Museum

Peter Thomson with an Excelsior 999cc Big Twin motorcycle. Peter Thomson developed his own museum from his collection of motorcycles, at 1154 Rongotea Road Kairanga. It has over 100 motorcycles on display, dating from 1904 to present day, as well as motorcycling memorabilia, brochures, motor cycle magazines, parts and workshop manuals.

 
Peter Thomson at his Motorcycle Museum

Peter Thomson at his Motorcycle Museum

Peter Thomson developed his own museum from his collection of motorcycles, at 1154 Rongotea Road Kairanga. It has over 100 motorcycles on display, dating from 1904 to present day, as well as motorcycling memorabilia, brochures, motor cycle magazines, parts and workshop manuals.

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