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Back Issues: Society's seeds were planted 100 years ago

Back Issues: Society's seeds were planted 100 years ago

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Palmerston North Horticultural Society celebrates 100 years. Forming a horticultural society was discussed as early as 1881, but it was not permanently established until 1922. Throughout the years, the key aims of the Palmerston North Horticultural Society have remained the same: Horticultural education, the fostering of industry, promoting the beautification of public and private spaces and bringing together like-minded horticultural enthusiasts.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: What was making the news 50 years ago today?

Back Issues: What was making the news 50 years ago today?

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Fifty years ago newspapers were going through a period of change. They were facing competition from television and radio news, technological change and shifts in ownership. This article sumarises what made the news in the Evening Standard on 18 May 1974.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Ugly duckling or hidden swan? Palmerston North railway station

Back Issues: Ugly duckling or hidden swan? Palmerston North railway station

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. History of the Palmerston North railway station building. Planning for the present (2024) third Palmerston North railway station in Matthews Avenue Takaro, started in the 1920s. Plans were revised in 1939 and again after WWII to incorporate new station design. It officially opened 21 October 1963.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Club marks 75 years on patrol

Back Issues: Club marks 75 years on patrol

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. History of the Palmerston North Surf Life Saving Club. The first patrol operated at Himatangi Beach in 1947 and the first competition team attended a surf life saving carnival at Foxton Beach in 1949.

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Himatangi Beach
 
Back Issues: Twilight years of cricket in Palmerston North

Back Issues: Twilight years of cricket in Palmerston North

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Manawatū Cricket Association (MCA) took advantage of the introduction of daylight saving in 1974 and established a midweek "Twilight Competition" for clubs and business houses in Palmerston North. 14 Teams entered the first season and artificial cricket pitch installations commenced to replace the poor quality grass at Ongley Park.
By 1986/87, 111 teams entered the competition, making it the largest competition of its kind in New Zealand. The rising popularity of touch rugby saw the reduction of twilight cricket teams to 17 by the 2022/23 season.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Last of the swagmen

Back Issues: Last of the swagmen

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Bernet Krumin, also known as Barnett Crumin, Barrett Crumen (or Krumen) was born in Latvia in 1878. He was better known in New Zealand as Russian Jack and walked North Island roads for 53 years. Most of the roads the swagman travelled were in the Manawatū, Wairarapa and Rangitīkei.

Bernet regularly travelled to Palmerston North and visited the Leyland family who lived in College Street. He died aged 90 in 1968 and is buried in Greytown cemetery.

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Lower North Island
 
Back Issues: Ode to the Manawatū mosquito

Back Issues: Ode to the Manawatū mosquito

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. In the 1800s, Manawatū mosquitoes dominated forests and wetlands. They were a challenge for Māori, the new settlers and livestock. Historical accounts reported swarms of bloodthirsty mosquitoes fatally attacking dogs.

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Manawatū
 
Back Issues:The hurricane and the big match

Back Issues:The hurricane and the big match

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The 1936 storm that destroyed the Sportsground (Fitzherbert Park) grandstand and forced the abandonment of an international cricket match.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: An indelible contribution to the rise of kindergarten

Back Issues: An indelible contribution to the rise of kindergarten

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. From 1958, the government required that new kindergartens be established in specially designed buildings. Kindergartens were owned and operated by committees, requiring community planning, local fundraising and extensive parent involvement. The Palmerston North Free Kindergarten Association oversaw the opening of the Hokowhitu Kindergarten in 1958. The association was renamed Manawatū Free Kindergarten in 1969, when it oversaw 22 kindergartens. A key local figure was Edith (Edie) Martin, whose contributions spanned 30 years and included being a mother help, an associate president and seven years as National President of the New Zealand Free Kindergarten Association (NZFKA).

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Manawatū
 
Back Issues: Firmness and fairness from the bench

Back Issues: Firmness and fairness from the bench

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Judge Herbert Percival Lawry ruled on all matters of criminality and injustice in Palmerston North 1937-1945. He was recognised for his practical and humanitarian qualities in dispensing justice.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: The election campaign that turned a swing seat red

Back Issues: The election campaign that turned a swing seat red

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Since World War 2, Palmerston North was considered a swing seat, with National or Labour candidates winning elections. In 1978 it was the country's second most marginal seat and the two parties battled for the city. Party leaders held several local contentious meetings, with protest action directed mainly at National leader Robert Muldoon. The seat was won by Labour's Joe Walding and has since been held by the Labour Party. (2024).

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: When MRSA outbreak gripped city

Back Issues: When MRSA outbreak gripped city

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. In January 1986, routine testing detected the presence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in two patients in Palmerston North. It was the start of an outbreak that put increased pressure on staff at a time when there was a shortage of nurses. MRSA was detected in 253 patients and 17 staff between 1986 and 1989. Despite it being a significant problem for several years, Palmerston North Hospital succeeded in eliminating MRSA with no deaths attributed to the outbreak.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Ovation to a legacy of evolution and song

Back Issues: Ovation to a legacy of evolution and song

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. History of musical theatre in Palmerston North. In 1900, the Palmerston North Amateur Dramatic Society was formed. Over its nearly 125 year history it has been known by several names including Act Three Productions, Abbey Musical Theatre and the Palmerston North Operatic Society. Many popular productions have been staged over the years at the Lyceum Theatre, the Palmerston North Opera House, Abbey Musical Theatre, the Regent on Broadway and Wallace Development Company Theatre.

The Covid pandemic caused disruptions, cancellations and major financial losses for the society. However, with 200 dedicated members and a return to staging major productions, popular musical theatre is set to continue in the city.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Sporting history made 100 years ago

Back Issues: Sporting history made 100 years ago

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. It is 100 years since New Zealand men's hockey commenced international competition when they played Australia at the Sportsground, now Fitzherbert Park, on 27 September 1922. An estimated 1500 people attended the game, which was won by New Zealand 5-4.

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Back Issues: Great artist made impression in Manawatū

Back Issues: Great artist made impression in Manawatū

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The career of 1969-1971 Manawatū Art Gallery director Ian North. During his two years at the gallery he made a significant contribution. At the age of only 24, he oversaw a busy schedule of changing exhibitions and active development of the permanent collection. His work includes the curation of 16 paintings by contemporary New Zealand artists, purchased from the 1971 Centenary Exhibition.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues:  NZ's off-grid frontier began here

Back Issues: NZ's off-grid frontier began here

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Remote Area Power Supply Systems (or RAPS) project in the late 1990s aimed to establish a small-scale independent energy system capable of powering a family home in a remote location. The article describes how this specific project for a property in the Kahuterawa Valley grew into an extended programme setting up the growth of this alternative energy industry in New Zealand.

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Manawatū
 
Back Issues: An anniversary with meaning for Manawatū

Back Issues: An anniversary with meaning for Manawatū

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The history of Wellington anniversary day and a case for celebrating Palmerston North anniversary separatedly.

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Manawatū
 
Back Issues: The first Pākehā women of Palmerston North

Back Issues: The first Pākehā women of Palmerston North

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The earliest that Pākehā women arrived in Palmerston North was believed to be in 1866, when some travelled through totara forest from Foxton. Although Louisa Snelson has been recognised as the third Pākehā women in Palmerston North in 1873, a group of Scandinavian women came before her. This article tells the immigration story of these earliest Scandanavian settlers. It also includes the stories of Lydia Burr née Hoskins, Matilda Perrin née Montgomery, Louisa Snelson, Sarah Linton née Kibblewhite and Harriette Cole née Durrant.

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Palmerston North and Horowhenua
 
Springbok Tour - When the tour came to town
Springbok Tour - When the tour came to town

Springbok Tour - When the tour came to town

Manawatū Standard article about the 1981 Springboks tour and the role protesters played in the anti-our movement. The Springboks vs All Blacks game on 1 August 1981 in Palmerston North was marred by protest, conflict between rugby supporters, anti-tour protesters and the police. Thousands of people demonstrated, clashing with rugby supporters in several locations. National anti-tour protest groups Hart and Mast organised local protest marchers. The showgrounds were barricaded with large containers and fences topped with barbed wire to keep out opposition to the game.

The game was attended by more than 20,000 spectators. It was a close game, won by the visitors 31-19.

Many felt the game should not have gone ahead. A week earlier, the game in Hamilton had been stopped by protesters marching on the rugby field. Police wanted no repeat of a stopped game. Those opposed to the tour included activist Penny Poutu, local councillors, local All Black Bob Burgess, and unionist Roger Middlemass.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: When barbed wire and batons lined Cuba St

Back Issues: When barbed wire and batons lined Cuba St

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Stephen Berg recalls the tensions in Palmerston North between rugby supporters and anti- Springbok tour protesters, July and August 1981.

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Palmerston North
 
Memory Lane - "Playing host to history" [Abridged]

Memory Lane - "Playing host to history" [Abridged]

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Māori Battalion trains at the Palmerston North showgrounds in 1940. Abridged from original article, 22 April 2006.

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Palmerston North
 
Memory Lane - "Playing host to history"

Memory Lane - "Playing host to history"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Māori Battalion trains at the Palmerston North showgrounds in 1940.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Dogs of war and the firebrand veteran

Back Issues: Dogs of war and the firebrand veteran

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The story of the dog Tiger, a great dane, mascot of the Māori Battalion during World War 2. Tiger was the companion dog of Captain Harding Waipuke Leaf (Ngā Puhi). Tiger stayed in New Zealand when Captain Leaf departed for service overseas. Sadly he died in Crete in 1941.

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Back Issues: Transit camps experiment in social housing

Back Issues: Transit camps experiment in social housing

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Hokowhitu Transit camp was a temporary housing initiative by council and government 1945-1959. Post World World 2, the government was challenged with a housing crises nationwide as soldiers returned from service abroad. The camp houses were made up from former army huts, surplus after the war. These were established on the site later occupied by Teachers' College. It was a community, a social housing response to meet the shortage of suitable housing for young families.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: Helen Urquhart: Domestic No. 5094

Back Issues: Helen Urquhart: Domestic No. 5094

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Life story of Helen Urquhart, later Helen Zander (1905-1994). Born in Scotland, Helen was one of about 4500 British domestic servants who were sponsored free passage to travel to New Zealand in the 1920s.

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Back Issues: City luminous as a Christmas tree

Back Issues: City luminous as a Christmas tree

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Special "Regent Street" London made street lights celebrated both the Palmerston North centennial and Christmas in 1970. The lights were hung in Broadway Avenue, Rangitikei Street and in the streets around Te Marae o Hine/The Square. The lights were displayed each festive season until 1975.

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Palmerston North
 
Back Issues: The lost 'poor persons' of Terrace End Cemetery

Back Issues: The lost 'poor persons' of Terrace End Cemetery

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The oldest part of Terrace End Cemetery is called Public Reserve Number 1 and dates back to 1875. There are only a handful of headstones and plaques in this large flat area of the cemetery. It is believed that up to 2000 people are interred here. Most are unidentified people who could not afford a marked plot and includes the remains of stillborn babies, infants and children.

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Palmerston North
 
Memory Lane - "Ruahine Street remembered with love"

Memory Lane - "Ruahine Street remembered with love"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. The collection of shops and houses between St Mary's Church and number 89 Ruahine Street holds special memories for many citizens. In the 1950s and 1960s, there has been a dairy, a cakeshop, a coffee shop, a haberdashery, a butcher and a hairdresser on this block opposite the hospital.
Christopher's Hairstylists, owned by "Mr Christopher" Paskins occupied number 89 Ruahine Street for many years. Today, Georgies Wigs and Hair Design lease the front shop space, whilst the back is a residential home.

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Palmerston North
 
Memory Lane - "Preserving our heritage"

Memory Lane - "Preserving our heritage"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. This article marks the 10th anniversary of Palmerston North Library's heritage archive going digital. It started in 2008 with the launch of Pataka Ipurangi/Manawatū Memory Online, a project to digitise photos held in the Ian Matheson Community archives. By 2016 the technology had become outdated and was replaced with the interactive Manawatū Heritage website. A much wider range of materials was able to be added. The website now includes maps, plans, photo albums, film and oral history interviews. The site can be accessed from all over the world on a digital device for finding, downloading and sharing most of the content.

The library's Heritage team encourages contributions of local history material from the public and also welcomes additional information about material already published on Manawatū Heritage.

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Manawatū
 
Memory Lane - "Tales from the grave"

Memory Lane - "Tales from the grave"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. Background stories of some of the graves at the historic Terrace End cemetery on Napier Road. One of the oldest remaining headstones is that of Meritini Te Panau, who died in 1888. She was the wife of Kerei Te Panau (died 1908, age 103), a prominent Rangitāne kaumatua. Also buried here are Palmerston North's first mayor and his wife, George and Louisa Snelson.

The Napier Road cemetery is the burial grounds for almost 10,000 people. The land for the cemetery was gifted by Rangitāne in 1875. A new cemetery in Kelvin Grove was opened in 1927 and the older cemetery has been closed for many years. However the descendants of those buried at the Terrace End cemetery can be buried with their relatives if there is room.

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Palmerston North
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