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Back Issues: Caccia Birch House - a survival story

Back Issues: Caccia Birch House - a survival story

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. History of Caccia Birch House since about 1895. Margaret Tennant writes that despite falling into disrepair at times, it is one of the few grand old homes in Palmerston North to survive when many others have been lost. In 1941 it passed from private ownership to the NZ Government and was variously used by the army in WWII, as a convalescent home for nurses, and by both Victoria and Massey Universities. The house has been owned by Palmerston North City Council since 1984 and has been restored and renovated as a conference and function centre. It is a Category 1 listed building with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust because of its historical, architectural and community significance.

 
Back Issues: When gondolas and elephants ruled the lagoon

Back Issues: When gondolas and elephants ruled the lagoon

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. History of Hokowhitu Lagoon and the first Carnival of the Lake, January 1963. The five day programme was organised by the Palmerston North Public Relations Organisation. The events drew up to 3000 spectators.

 
Back Issues: Fear, riots and renamed streets

Back Issues: Fear, riots and renamed streets

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. During World War I, anyone seen as linked to enemy countries was a target for hatred. Not even people born in New Zealand were immune. In the Manawatū, German immigrants, people with non-British sounding surnames, Lutheran churches and associated schools suffered discrimination. Many street names associated with Germans were changed.

 
Back Issues: Gwen Gibbs: An inspirational dance teacher who left a dynamic legacy

Back Issues: Gwen Gibbs: An inspirational dance teacher who left a dynamic legacy

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Biography of dance teacher Gwen Gibbs, 1898-1983. After performing internationally, she established the Broadway School of dancing about 1929. She knew important ballet people and travelled overseas for new ideas. She was a life-long student of dance and left a strong teaching legacy, training several long standing Palmerston North teachers who have gone on to train professional dancers. Gwen Gibbs was her stage name. Born Gwendolyn Lillian Rogers, she married Gordon Milton McCaskill in 1923. Their only son Donald Gordon McCaskill, a pilot, died on war service World War II.

 
Back Issues: A pioneering town planner

Back Issues: A pioneering town planner

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Life story of John Tiffin Stewart (1827-1913) town planner and government surveyor. He was responsible for the planning of Manawatū's towns in the 19th century. Born in Scotland, he moved to Foxton in 1864. He learnt to speak te reo Māori fluently and worked closely and respectfully with local iwi. In later years, he moved to Whanganui, where he was elected to the Borough Council.

 
Memory Lane - "Brass band has staying power"

Memory Lane - "Brass band has staying power"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. History of brass bands in Palmerston North. The earliest brass band in Palmerston North was the Garrison Band, formed in 1864. It was an important part of the city's entertainment scene from its earliest days. Over its long history, the Garrison band combined with the City Silver Band and eventually became the Palmerston North Brass Band in 1972. Life member and president (2015) John Ward has been awarded a civic award and Queen's Service Medal for services to music.

 
Memory Lane - "The Mather Papers"

Memory Lane - "The Mather Papers"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. Tribute to distinguished historian and teacher Brian Mather (1928-2008), founder of the Local History Study Group which later became the Palmerston North Historical Society Inc. He contributed significantly to researching and raising awareness of Palmerston North's history. Brian's research work is a lasting legacy to the city.

 
Back Issues: 116th anniversary of Te Awe Awe statue

Back Issues: 116th anniversary of Te Awe Awe statue

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. History and description of the statue of Te Peeti Te Awe Awe, one of Rangitāne's notable leaders of the 19th Century. The statue was ceremoniously unveiled in Te Marae o Hine/The Square on 29 January 1907.

 
Back Issues: A life of major scale in Manawatū

Back Issues: A life of major scale in Manawatū

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Life story of influential and distinguished music teacher, Evelyn Mary Rawlins (1889-1977). Her financial legacy funded the Evelyn Rawlins Room and continues to support the development of artists and projects.

 
Back Issues: Where have all the barmaids gone?

Back Issues: Where have all the barmaids gone?

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The role of barmaids and their working conditions in the early 20th century is described. Dolly Grey worked at the Family Hotel, Rangitikei Street in 1904. She was said to be one of the first barmaids in Palmerston North.

 
Back Issues: Remembering the fallen at Memorial Park

Back Issues: Remembering the fallen at Memorial Park

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The history of remembrance at Memorial Park includes memories of individual tragedies, World War II deaths, women's work at home and military service during World War II. More recently, Unions Manawatū have erected a memorial at the park to workers killed, injured or made ill at work.

 
Back Issues: A pavilion for the people and the 'pusses'

Back Issues: A pavilion for the people and the 'pusses'

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Story of the 1970s Centennial pavilion building in Te Marae o Hine and its repurpose as the Kelvin Grove Community Centre in 1980.

 
Back Issues: The fight for women's votes

Back Issues: The fight for women's votes

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The Manawatū/Horowhenua campaign for women's voting rights in the 1890s was led by a group of passionate advocates. These included Learmonth White Dalrymple, Margaret Giesen, her daughter Edith Giesen, Mary Alice Sorley, Clara Lethbridge, Minnie Leary, Mary Butters and Elizabeth Esther Dillon. When the local branches of the women's run Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) were formed, a number of husbands offered support. The WCTU main objective was temperance, which was addressed through the lens of other women's issues, including obtaining the vote.

 
Back Issues:The hurricane and the big match

Back Issues:The hurricane and the big match

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The 1936 storm that destroyed the Sportsground (Fitzherbert Park) grandstand and forced the abandonment of an international cricket match.

 
Back Issues: The MCC and the cricketing engine driver

Back Issues: The MCC and the cricketing engine driver

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. A detailed account and description of a cricket game in Palmerston North, 1930. The Manawatū team played the touring Marylebone Cricket Club from England. The local team included train driver Alexander (Alec) McVicar, who played 75 matches for Manawatū.

 
Back Issues: Welcome to Papaioea

Back Issues: Welcome to Papaioea

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Historian Margaret Tennant explores the controversial history behind the name Palmerston North.

 
Back Issues: Fall and rise of Feilding's town clock

Back Issues: Fall and rise of Feilding's town clock

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Manchester Square clock tower controversial history from 1904. Many of its opponents over the years believed motorists would drive into it. The correct author of this article is Simon Johnson.

 
Back Issues: A man of good fortune and fortitude

Back Issues: A man of good fortune and fortitude

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. The story of Edward (Ted) Barling, detective, deerstalker and founder of the Himatangi Beach resort, first half 20th Century.

 
Back Issues: When barbed wire and batons lined Cuba St

Back Issues: When barbed wire and batons lined Cuba St

Local historians weekly "Back Issues" article in the Manawatū Standard. Stephen Berg recalls the tensions in Palmerston North between rugby supporters and anti- Springbok tour protesters, July and August 1981.

 
Memory Lane - "A man of mana"

Memory Lane - "A man of mana"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. The life story of respected Manawatū chief Nireaha Tāmaki (mid-1830s - 1911), a tribal arbitrator who championed the rights of Māori and won a decision from the Privy Council acknowledging traditional Māori land ownership. ## ​ ## ​

 
Memory Lane - "Circus of family fun"

Memory Lane - "Circus of family fun"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. A look back at some local circus history, as reported in the newspaper. Travelling circus visits to Palmerston North have been reported since 1909, and have continued to the present day.

 
Memory Lane - "A grand marriage in Manawatū"

Memory Lane - "A grand marriage in Manawatū"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. The life story of Minister of Parliament, mayor and councillor James (Jimmy) Nash and his wife Elizabeth (nee Keogh). They were married in 1895 and lived in Waimarama, a past homestead on Alfred Street.

 
Memory Lane - "Old letters a window into life of early farmer"

Memory Lane - "Old letters a window into life of early farmer"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. Three handwritten letters, written by Tokomaru farmer Edward Griffiths to friends in England, have been donated to the Ian Matheson city archives. The letters describe the life of a settler farmer in Tokomaru in the late 1800's to early1900s.

 
Memory Lane - "Pineapple paradise to Palmerston North Press"

Memory Lane - "Pineapple paradise to Palmerston North Press"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. The life story of Norman Alfred Nash, one of the Nash family members who founded the Manawatū Standard. Includes details of several years that he and his young family spent in Hawaii.

 
Memory Lane - "Brick was the best"

Memory Lane - "Brick was the best"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. Story behind the brick house on the corner of Ngata and Featherston Streets built in 1923 and demolished in 2007.

 
Memory Lane - "Just another day at the courthouse"

Memory Lane - "Just another day at the courthouse"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. A selection of local petty crime stories reported in the region's May 1921 newspapers.

 
Memory Lane - "Letters home form Chunuk Bair"

Memory Lane - "Letters home form Chunuk Bair"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. Two World War 1 soldiers from Bunnythorpe, Len and Pat Argyle, wrote letters home to their parents from the war front.

 
Memory Lane - "A lifetime of putting focus on Manawatū"

Memory Lane - "A lifetime of putting focus on Manawatū"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. History of local photography and photography clubs. The first Manawatū Camera Club started in 1900. It was reformed several times. The present day club traces its origins back to 1947, when it was formed with the aim of promoting the enjoyment of photography for individuals and the community.

 
Memory Lane - "A boy's tale: Growing up in early Palmerston North"

Memory Lane - "A boy's tale: Growing up in early Palmerston North"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. Childhood memories of Leslie Aldridge Hanson, grandson of early settlers Emma and William Aldridge, who arrived in Palmerston North in 1874. Leslie is the author of "Old Terrace End", his memoir of living in Terrace End, Palmerston North as a child.

 
Memory Lane - "Going from mystical clearing to village green"

Memory Lane - "Going from mystical clearing to village green"

Journalist Tina White's weekly "Memory Lane" article in the Manawatū Standard. The history of Te Marae o Hine/The Square from its earliest days. The 6.8 hectare clearing at the centre of Palmerston North evolved as the town grew around it.

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