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Roger Berry: Life as a vet, part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Roger Berry: Life as a vet, part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 26th February 2019. Roger Berry part 2 of 3.  Farm equipment for handling animals. Injuries? Hours worked. Limited free time. Rugby. Small animal vets. Dentists. Working weekends. Callout distances. Phone exchanges helping. Office staff. Vet nurses. Limited social life. Cricket, church. Rural school activities. Squash club. Carnival, 1956. Manfeild. Marriage aged 30. Dance hall in Palmerston North. Other dances. Alcohol, flagons in the car. Smoking. Cinema. Vet Club buying a house for him to rent. Bought land and built a house in 1981 

 
Living in Feilding - oral interview

Living in Feilding - oral interview

Oral interview with Margaret Bailey and Brian Hunter about family life, growing up and living in the Feilding area. Interviewed at the Coach House Museum in Feilding. Summary of interview: 0.00 Introduction 0.43 Born in Feilding, moved to 20 acre block, there for 7 years. Father worked in town, but needed extra income in the depression. Had a few cows. Several neighbours doing similar things. 4.24 Father went to work by car. When at school (1937-1940), he would drive her home and back at lunch (‘dinner’) time. Returned to town in 1940 after father died. 5.56 Large family? 2 brothers, one older, one younger. Memory of biking home, dive bombed by a magpie. 7.02 did not like riding down Kimbolton Road because of a swagger’s hut. 8.56 Comparison of town versus farmlet living? Memories vague, including of her father. When married, husband Graham 7 years older, so more memories of her father. 10.25 back in town was still very rural, uncle’s farm across the road. Neighbour’s horse trough outside her bedroom. 11.20 Outdoor life? Yes, but quite organized. Mother protective. Not allowed to river unsupervised. No father, so lots of chores. Conscious of lack of father. 13.07 Heard teacher saying, “But they haven’t got a dad at home”. 13.56 Uncle gave goose at Christmas, children had to pluck it. Many other chores. 14.56 gender division in chores? No. Wanted to do the same as the boys. 15.54 Mr Bryant over the back fence, wicker worker, made baskets, grew own willows. 17.03 Animals? Not many. Horse? No, not an option, and no friends with horses. 18.28 Memories of local hospital. Grandstand at Johnson Park (engineers housed there in the war, mother had telephone, unusual, soldiers used her phone, also ran Bedand breakfast for men’s wives and children. 20.25 How broad was your world, Palmerston North a big trip? Yes, although had car. Parents had 7 year courtship while saved to buy a house. Also had washing machine (described, Canadian, tub and wringer). 21.43 Mother had married sister in Palmerston North, the couple would go to Feilding at weekends to help them. 22.16 Did not travel far. Holidays with friends at Foxton Beach (very common for local families, but they only went for a couple of weeks). Other holidays with friends at Waitarere Beach, once to Tauranga. No overseas travel (even for her school riends, South Island was far). 25.21 Tramping holidays? Never, was a minority interest then, partly because few cars. Not much use of horses, even for school children. Lytton Street School had large catchment. 26.58 When at high school, Halcombe children came by train, always late. Boarders at her home, so she shared a bedroom with her mother until married. Mother on widow’s benefit, did not work (“not many mothers did at that stage”). Money was tight, so strange that, unlike most, they had car, phone, washing machine. 29.21 Memories of school? Good. Only 1 teacher she didn’t like, no difficulty with lessons. Academic ambitions? Enjoyed manual training classes (cooking and sewing), so wanted to teach these. University not an option. 4 years at high school, then worked in office of Hodder and Tolley’s mill for 2 years to save enough for teacher’s college. 31.49 Course offered in Dunedin. Accepted, with friend Colleen Smith. Went by train, overnight ferry, and all next day by train to Dunedin (a day and a half). Boarded at YWCA hostel, then second year in Christchurch, third year a preparationary year at 3 institutions in her area, 1 term in each. Actually got early registration, then to job in Hawkes Bay. Engaged just before left for Hawkes Bay and returned after a year. 36.03 What sort of cooking did you teach? Basic, things that could be done in a short time (scones, no time for meat). Trying to give enjoyment of cooking, different methods of cooking. Meals were boiled vegetables plus meat, followed by pudding. 39.28 Sewing? Basic, using sewing machines, following a pattern. Normal for women to make their own and children’s clothes. 41.28 His mother made his clothes. 41.33 Margaret’s 4 children did not have a bought garment until intermediate school. She made everything, sometimes by cutting down other clothing. It is what people did. Brian’s wife does that with woolens, using the wool to knit something else. 42.53 Needlework? Samplers. Covered in training, but did not teach. 43.31 No zips, so buttons. Early zips and elastic, quality not so good at first. Button holes made by hand. Treadle sewing machines, so no fancy stitches. 45.11 Made button holes when boarding in Dunedin. 46.11 Only teaching after first year was in night classes (Feilding High School, about 1955-60). Night school very active then. 47.16 What subjects taught at night school? She taught young mothers to make clothes for their children (could not afford to buy). 49.04 Brian – mother at home and taught them to cook, etc.. Later girls did not learn these things at home or at school. 49.50 Was adult education active then? Yes, very active, but functional, not career focused. 50.47 Brian – L J Wild and his wife pioneers of “learning for life”, Feilding a leader in this. Also literature, debating, etc., and Feilding Little Theatre. Union activity in learning (as in UK)? Not in Feilding, little union activity. 54.23 Perception of capitalist-worker distinction? Perhaps in the freezing works, but otherwise not. 55.31 Back to women’s experiences, different from men’s? Most women stayed at home once married. Men and women met through families or church. 57.01 Suggested to join Country Women’s Institute, but not welcome because lived near a town, but was allowed to be a judge for them. Few women joined sports clubs. Now with cars easier to do more things. Men also had limited range of opportunities. Generally a close knit community. 1.02.21 Many outsiders moving to the district? Nothing comes to mind. Attitude to Maori, Australians, England? 1.03.39 First contact with Maori children, just accepted, no difference, but came and went by bus, so less contact out of school. 1.05.07 Ancestry? Scottish links, maternal grandfather came out in 1879. Paternal grandfather born in Australia, parents from north of England. Parents referred to England as home. She has been to UK and met family there. Youngest son working there for 15 years, so several trips. Seen as “exceptionally” strange relative from other side of the world. Saw them as stuck in traditions, more varied experiences in NZ. 1 relative in farming, but very different there (tenant farmer). 1.13.20 Are your children nearby? 3 stayed in the Manawatu. Youngest in Wellington. 1.15.30 On the farm, growing own food? After marriage, grew everything except bananas. Overseas visitors amazed that everything in the meal was home-grown. 1.18.15 Advent of home freezer had big impact. Also did lots of preserving. Pantry shelves designed for preserving jars, jam jars. 1.20.27 Entertainment? Radio? When young, played cards and board games. Singing and music through church. Music lessons as a child, piano, very common then. Record players came in when a teenager. Sundays for sitting quietly. When young, Sunday afternoons visiting grandparents, but mainly adults talking to each other, children to be “seen and not heard”. By high school, family could take a drive into the country with boyfriend. 1.27.46 On Wednesdays boy borders allowed into town, so girls would go too and go to milk bar for milk shakes. All very innocent, but enjoyable. One occasion of teenage pregnancy, the girl went away for a while. 1.28.58 Began high school in 1945. At end of war everyone celebrated, school closed. Conga line went through a hotel, first time inside one, but just in and out. 1.30.34 Troops returning. An aunt had been a nurse overseas. Continued to work after marriage, but no children. An uncle came back, marriage failed. Was 13 when war ended, so not particularly significant for her. 1.33.29 Television? They got it in 1967, but Graham’s parents lived over the road and had a set, so their children could see it there. That generation of grandparents closer than earlier generation, but his parents did no babysitting, her mother came out from town for that. Used to go to country dances (through the Masonic Lodge) on a Saturday night when children were small. 1.37.49 Brian on Savage Club concerts and the origin of the Savage Club. 1.39.04 Margaret remembering Savage Club in a parade. 1.39.20 Types of dancing? Waltz, Foxtrot, etc., not Rock and Roll. 1.41.04 Brian on Masons, men only, low profile. Records now with the museum. Different views in the community on the value of the Masons. Roman Catholics not members and not in favour if Masons. 1.43.08 Attitude to alcohol then (6 o’clock swill)? As a Methodist, not in favour. Women would rarely drink. First time dined in a hotel was on her honeymoon. Tobacco very common, nearly all men smoked, but not women. 1.45.57 Friend’s father smoked a pipe while riding a bike. Fell off and damaged his mouth. 1.47.21 Was cinema important? Yes. Saturday night in Feilding. National anthem, newsreels, interval and then film. 1.48.58 Brian – before television, cinemas used to show rugby tests in the lunch hour a week or two after the game. 1.50.22 Any takeaway shops? Fish and chips. Department stores in Palmerston North had tea rooms, lace table cloths. 1.52.01 Cashier in Cobbs store in Feilding – spring-loaded mechanism taking money to cashier and change sent back. 1.53.07 Brian was a delivery boy at Cobbs when someone put spider in container sent to cashier. Description of other after-school jobs he’d had. 1.55.26 Margaret’s first job at Hodder and Tolley’s paid 35 shillings a week (about $240 in 2015 prices). Needed shoes, but 32 shillings and 6 pence. Mother would not let her get them until had more money. 1.57.26 Changed attitudes to saving and debt then and now. 1.59.05 New Zealand went from pounds to dollars and numerically prices doubled. Description of change and preparation for changes. Had to show both prices for some time. Easier after decimalization, also for other measures. 2.01.49 significance of mental arithmetic. Grandchildren and calculators. 2.06.22 Margaret wanted to buy 10 items, shop assistant could not work out cost of 10. 2.08.10 Discipline in schools? In standard 5 and 6, problem with boys, so put in one class and strapping was used. In her teaching, not such a problem because teaching practical skills. 2.11.04 Winding down, Brian describing conversations at Thursday morning smokos at the museum.

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Date
October 17, 2015
 
Pataka Ipurangi Launch Night speakers: Dr Jock Phillips, Lesley Courtney, Philippa Elphick – Talk part 1/2

Pataka Ipurangi Launch Night speakers: Dr Jock Phillips, Lesley Courtney, Philippa Elphick – Talk part 1/2

To launch Pataka Ipurangi (Digital Library) the Palmerston North City Library held an evening event in the Sound and Vision Zone. The guest speaker was Dr Jock Phillips the General Editor of Te Ara the 'Online Encyclopedia of New Zealand'. Dr Phillips gives an overview of Te Ara and explored in detail some of the features of the new theme 'The Bush'. Duration 47 minute mp3 file. (part 1/2 of the recording)

 
Oral Interview - Brian Elwood

Oral Interview - Brian Elwood

Sir Brian George Conway Elwood, CBE, JP, (born 5 April 1933) is a former New Zealand lawyer, politician, and public servant. He served as mayor of Palmerston North from 1971 to 1985, and was the Chief Ombudsman of New Zealand from December 1994 to June 2003. In the latter role, he was responsible for investigating complaints against central and local government agencies, including Ministers of the Crown. Interview of Brian Elwood as Mayor of Palmerston North, conducted by Ian Matheson on 2 May 1985. Interview length: 1 hour, 36 minutes and 55 seconds.

 
Reg Bridewell on Bridewell's Bakery - Manawatu Conversations

Reg Bridewell on Bridewell's Bakery - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 8 January 2019. Reg Bridewell. Summary: Grandfather came to NZ in 1929 and set up a bakery in Palmerston North. Bakeries had zones. Self-help shops. Home deliveries, horse and cart, then a van after the war. First bakery in Victoria Avenue and Main Street (photo of this). Baking in brick oven heated with wood shavings. Horses in a paddock. Description of the oven. Grandfather’s lost recipe book. White and wholemeal bread only. More variety with electric ovens. Barracuda loaf. Working hours. New equipment after the war. Rationing supplies. Horses knowing the route. Now centralized, takeovers. Baking in Auckland. Boniface’s Bakery. Better quality now. Homestyle and Freshbake brands. “Improvers” added to the flour. Original bakery still standing.

 
Oral Interview - Consumers' Co-operative Society (Manawatu) Ltd

Oral Interview - Consumers' Co-operative Society (Manawatu) Ltd

Interview with Bill Roach, MBE. He worked for the Co-Op from 1971 - 1985 and retired as Chairman of the Board. Interview took place at the time of the 50th jubilee of the Co-Op in 1992. Interviewer: Lee Matthews, reporter for the Manawatu Evening Standard Length: 56 minutes and 30 seconds

 
Eric Franklyn, work and leisure part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Eric Franklyn, work and leisure part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu people's Radio 14 August 2018, Eric Franklyn Part 2 of 2. Summary: Made redundant and retired in 1998. Takaro Sports Club. Time in JCs. Changes in courts. Treasurer of Takaro Sports Club for 13 or 14 years until recently. Gaming machines, improvements to club. Skills of public servants. Viability of clubs, falling membership. Climbing Mount Taranaki/Egmont. School days. Discipline. Teachers. NCEA.

 
Bev Quinn, hospice - Manawatu Conversations

Bev Quinn, hospice - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 23 October 2018. Bev Quinn. Summary: What is Hospice? How got into hospice – other nursing training and experience, including UK and Zimbabwe, district nursing in Palmerston North. Setting up the PN Hospice. Increased demand and changing nature of care, more in own homes now, palliative care nurses. Funding. Fundraising methods. Emotional involvement. Certification and accreditation. Activities for patients. Families staying over. Animals. Recording life stories. 8

 
Owen Dolan, missionary, bishop part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Owen Dolan, missionary, bishop part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 9 October 2018. Owen Dolan. Part 2 of 2. Summary: Missionary in Peru, other posts. Bishop from 1995. Role of bishop. Problems in the church. Catholic Church in NZ. Catholic schools. Debutant balls. Music in childhood. Bishops’ synods. Oscar Romero canonization. Changes in the Church. NZ focus? Priests from overseas. Celibacy.

 
Roger Berry: Life as a vet, part 1 - Manawatu Conversations

Roger Berry: Life as a vet, part 1 - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 19th February 2019. Roger Berry, Part 1 of 3. Training as a vet at Sydney University. Came to Feilding in 1953. Veterinary Clubs. Training selection process. 5 year bonding and repaying financial assistance. No vet training in New Zealand then. Nature of training. Far more vets now. Increased focus on herd health. Shift from sheep to dairy. 1976 scholarship for overseas study. Improved monitoring now, but farmers then could spot a lot. Robotic milking. Memorable incident. Position of vet in social structure. “Ram alley”. Small animal clinic in Kimbolton Road. Horse work.

 
Local Musical Duet - Josephine and Mary Newman

Local Musical Duet - Josephine and Mary Newman

This audio recording was made in Palmerston North in the 1960s by Josephine (Nina) and Mary (Meg) Newman, who were both living in the city at the time. Josephine was Nina's mother. Mary is her daughter whom we called Meg. The Newman family was a very musical one - Josephine’s mother Margot Hibbard was a singer in Auckland around 1910 and her sister Violet Sumerset tutored tenors at the Academy of Music in Melbourne. Music and singing were well ingrained into their upbringing. Meg was studying piano at the time of this recording and Nina was also talented in singing they decided it would be great to record them singing and playing the piano together to send to their mother in Melbourne for Christmas. The date of this recording is not exact, but it would have been around 1960 as it was just before Meg left Palmerston North moving to Melbourne to teach and continue studying piano. Meg did so well at piano she became one of Australia’s acclaimed teachers. Meg is now retired. This record consists of four tracks: Greetings, The Muses Gift, Arioso Primo Duet and Arise of Sun.

 
Lorraine Holtham; Her life in Palmerston North, part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Lorraine Holtham; Her life in Palmerston North, part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 12th February 2019. Lorraine Holtham, Part 2 of 5.  Intermediate school. Enjoyed school. Bike to school. Swimming sports. Subjects taken. Headmaster riding bike inside. Schools with swimming pools. Mother making clothes. High school: shorthand and typing. Male teachers in military uniform. Headmistress. Learning to touch-type. Lack of further education, difficulty going to university. History focus on England. Left school when turned 15. Father had retired (wounded in WWI), so tight time. Larger families then.  

 
Dennis Quinn, architect part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Dennis Quinn, architect part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 27 November 2018. Dennis Quinn Part 2 of 2. Summary: Coming to Palmerston North. Why moved here. Projects, telephone exchange. Range of work. Interaction with clients. Operation of contracts, role of architect, problems that arose. Registration. Changed work environment, competition, computerization. Drawing skills. Now drawing may be done offshore. Women architects.

 
Ann Behrens, teacher, part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Ann Behrens, teacher, part 2 - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 4 September 2018. Ann Behrens, Part 2 of 2. Summary: Coming to Palmerston North with a young family. Teaching at St Joseph’s. Comparison to St Dominic’s in Dunedin. No problem having a young child with her. History teaching. Playcentre and then the Psychological Service of the Education Service. Before the time of ADHD. Only woman in the service. Problems with their building. Became a manager, mainly of early childhood work. Management approach changed, “the era of managers”. Hobbies, family history. Germany and Norway. German submarine. Grandmother Scottish and a trained midwife (unusual in early 1900s). Why happy to stay in Palmerston North. Scandinavians in this area.

 
Abbeyfield residents - Manawatu Conversations

Abbeyfield residents - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Access Manawatu, 5 June 2018, Abbeyfield residents talk about Abbeyfield, a residence offering “senior flatting”. Summary: Part of a global system, started in England, 13 in New Zealand. Semi-independent living. Comparison to retirement village or rest home. Gardens. Why they came to Abbeyfield. Run by volunteers. National structure, establishment of new centres. Council donated the land, built by the army. New residents’ adjusting.

 
Dennis Quinn, architect part 1 - Manawatu Conversations

Dennis Quinn, architect part 1 - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 20 November 2018. Dennis Quinn. Part 1 of 2. Summary: Architect in Palmerston North from 1979. Earlier life, Wanganui, then university. Why architecture? Bursary scheme. Work in New Zealand, then to Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) for 2 years. Situation there. Architecture work, including UK, comparisons. Return to NZ, hiring and employment observations. Earthquake requirements.

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