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"Faulty Lights or Did Someone Stall"

"Faulty Lights or Did Someone Stall"

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 31 January, 1964. "Several drivers in this queue at the traffic lights at the intersection of Featherston and Rangitikei Street this week were certain that the lights were not working properly, causing the traffic to bank up like this. However, this week the City Council officials carried out its three-monthly check on the lights and they found nothing wrong. Could it have been that someone in the head of the queue had stalled?"

 
"Mr. Hoare Goes Up in the World" Painting the Chimney at Carbonic Ice Ltd.

"Mr. Hoare Goes Up in the World" Painting the Chimney at Carbonic Ice Ltd.

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 29 January, 1964. "From an earth-bound plant operator to a steeplejack is a big jump in one day, but it did not seem to worry Mr M. Hoare, an employee of Carbonic Ice, Ltd. In Tremaine Avenue. Mr Hoare went up 90 ft to paint a chimney above the factory. Asked what he thought of the job, Mr Hoare said: "All right. The bucket sways about 18 inches each way in the wind, but you soon get used to it." Mr Hoare is seen here up the chimney and in the "bucket" which lifts him up to his work." This is the second image. See also: 2017N_2017-20_018406

 
"Mr Hoare Goes up in the World" Painting the Carbonic Ice Ltd. Chimney

"Mr Hoare Goes up in the World" Painting the Carbonic Ice Ltd. Chimney

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 29 January, 1964. "From an earth-bound plant operator to a steeplejack is a big jump in one day, but it did not seem to worry Mr M. Hoare, an employee of Carbonic Ice, Ltd. In Tremaine Avenue. Mr Hoare went up 90 ft to paint a chimney above the factory. Asked what he thought of the job, Mr Hoare said: "All right. The bucket sways about 18 inches each way in the wind, but you soon get used to it." Mr Hoare is seen here up the chimney and in the "bucket" which lifts him up to his work." This is the first image. See also: 2017N_2017-20_018407

 
"Preparations for the Carnival" [Carnival of the Lake]

"Preparations for the Carnival" [Carnival of the Lake]

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 17 January, 1964. "Despite the early showers yesterday morning, work went on in preparation for the Carnival of the Lake. Due to uncertain weather conidtions[sic], however, the opening was postponed until today. Here a workman prepares the floating rostrum in readiness for the opening."

 
"Digging in Sand" for Pipis

"Digging in Sand" for Pipis

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 15 January, 1964. " "Put the pot on, Mum--we are having pipis for tea. Well, we might if we can dig up some more." Ian and Paul (rear) were certainly having a great time at Himatangi Beach helping Dad (Mr Adamson, of Palmerston North) grub in the sand and tide for shell fish."

 
"Preparing to Make Her Stroke" Croquet

"Preparing to Make Her Stroke" Croquet

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 9 January, 1964. "One of the members of the Northern Croquet Club prepares to make her stroke during a match playing on the club's ground on Saturday. Windy conditions did not assist the players but some fine scoring strokes were seen."

 
"Double Task for Bride's Father" Minister and Father of the Bride

"Double Task for Bride's Father" Minister and Father of the Bride

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 6 January, 1964. "Brigadier L. H. Jones, of the Salvation Army, was a happy father on Saturday. Not only did he lead his daughter to the altar, but he also conducted the wedding ceremony at the Terrace End Citadel that morning. The bride presented an attractive picture in her uniform with white lace wedding band. From the left are the bridegroom (Mr A. G. Davis), the bride, formerly Miss R. A. Jones, and Brigadier L. H. Jones." See also: 2017N_2017-20_018274, 2017N_2017-20_018275

 
"Icing Twenty-eight Christmas Cakes"

"Icing Twenty-eight Christmas Cakes"

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 23 December, 1959. “Miss M. Bloxam, the senior dietitian at the Palmerston North Hospital, puts paper ruffles on the Christmas cakes which she had previously iced. The cakes will be shared among the wards and the various departments during the Christmas period.”

 
"Every Picture Tells a Story" Collision with New Roundabout

"Every Picture Tells a Story" Collision with New Roundabout

This image was taken for a story that ran in The Manawatu Evening Standard on 10 October, 1959. "And this one tells a story of how a motorist was driving along Church Street, possibly during the hours of darkness and was unaware that a round-about had recently been installed at the Princess Street intersection. The photographed evidence of skid marks on the road showed the motorist did eventually notice the new island, but too late. He ploughed through the newly-sown turf and knocked the "keep left" sign aside as he went. The moral of the story could possibly be that the motorist now knows the round-about is there and will observe it in the future."

 
Diary of an itinerant farm worker

Diary of an itinerant farm worker

This "McDougall Farmers' Notebook 1935-36" was used as a diary by an unknown farm worker who went on 'Tour of N.I.', beginning 15 October 1935 (first entry). He travelled from Blenheim, and records his holiday, mainly in the Hawkes Bay and Giborne areas, and employment at Hore Hore Station near Tokomaru Bay. It is likely that the writer was J. Lane, named in the front cover, and also listed at the top of the 'Addresses' page. The last entry appears to be 18 December 1936, but a subsequent note records 'Drowened (sic) Easter 1939'. The Poverty Bay Herald (18 April, 1938, page 4) writes of the drowning of Joffre Lane, a station hand at Hore Hore Station.

 
The Meteor Theatre

The Meteor Theatre

The Meteor theatre was located on the west side of The Square, it operated from 1937-1964. This photograph shows the exterior of the building in the late 1950s. Gregory Peck starred in Moby Dick in 1956. Seating capacity was for 940 - 990 people, obtaining its films through J.C. Williamson company known as Palmerston North Amusements Limited. Upon closure it was converted into shops. The theatre was built by Maurice Millar of Millar and Giorgi, local menswear businessmen, with a value of 8500 pounds. In 1947 Robert Kerridge took over the Regent, Vogue, Mayfair and the Meteor establishing the Kerridge-Oden empire. The arrival of Television in 1960 led to a slump in theatre patronage, resulting in the closure of the Meteor and the Vogue. Ian Matheson for Evening Standard August 1990. See: Ian Matheson City Archives Research file A 175/ 148.

 
Peter MacGillivray part 2, World travels - Manawatu Conversations

Peter MacGillivray part 2, World travels - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio, 14th April 2020. Part 2 of 6. Travel to Scotland via America. Oregon sheep farming. 6 months in US, travelling in a 1942 Plymouth car. Delivering cars, mail. Canada, various jobs, powder packer, poultry farm egg candler, shearer. Currency exchange. Illegal immigrant. Shearing on the prairie. Travel to Scotland, train and ship. Family in Scotland. 90th birthday addressing the haggis. Glasgow policeman. “Mary’s Meals”. Autistic grandson and bi-polar friend. Met wife in Edinburgh. Back in Palmerston North bought small farm in Longburn. Wife died. 

 
John Thornley, Manawatu Workers Education Association - Manawatu Conversations

John Thornley, Manawatu Workers Education Association - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio, 5th May 2020.  Workers Education Association in NZ from 1915, but died away. UK origins. Revived in Palmerston North by Merv Hancock. John active mid-1980s to mid-1990s. Funding. Objectives, topics and approach. Attendance. Membership. Quarterly brochures. Trade Union Education Authority. Bicultural coverage, Mason Durie. Margaret Tate and a film on local history. Other local history films. Others who contributed to WEA. Break up of adult education into different fields (WEA had covered everything). Book Clubs. Supported by wife, a maths lecturer, while a house-husband and then worked part-time.  African student surprised to find a female academic. John in the Community Services Council. Interest in music. Problems getting people to volunteer. Anthony Lewis in the City Library. 

 
Don Bird part 2: Childhood a working life - Manawatu Conversations

Don Bird part 2: Childhood a working life - Manawatu Conversations

Broadcast on Manawatu People's Radio 18th February 2020. Part 2 of 2.  Don’s early childhood, lost 2 mothers in childbirth, then father died, raised by step-mother. Siblings, family relationships. Moved from Ashburton to a farm in the far north for a year, then Auckland. Had to leave school, part-time university study for commerce degree. Transferred to Dunedin. 1956 set up own business. Independent loss adjusters. Amalgamations. Work still very similar. Lloyds. Interesting aspects of the work. Work ethics. 

 
Russell Street Primary School, Primer 4, 1956

Russell Street Primary School, Primer 4, 1956

**Back Row**: Colin Hart, Michael Young, Douglas Bruhn, Lawrence McCallum, Michael Connell, Gary Thomas, Bernard Montgomery, John Whitehead, Kenneth McKenzie, Roger Dalton, ??. Miss Zinsley (became Mrs Rene Gordon). **Third Row**: Raewyn Pike, Donna MacDonald, Lynnette Andrews, Jan Davies, Elaine Hazlett, Kay Eaton, Deborah Boyle, Shirley Cameron, Sally Prebble **Second Row:** Diane Baird, Pamela Scott, Patricia Beatson, Elisabeth Beatson, ??, ??, Jillian Bieder, Penelope Bieder, Sharon?, Barbara Shand **Front Row:** Carolyn Booth, Jean Harper, Julie McDonald, Valerie Ann Dick, Cheryl Connell, Colleen Bell, Valda Dunlop, Estelle Beder

 
161-165 The Square – Mowlem Buildings (a.k.a. ‘Bares Buildings’)

161-165 The Square – Mowlem Buildings (a.k.a. ‘Bares Buildings’)

Arthur Robert Allen and his then business partner, Herbert Leslie Hickson, designed this building for Frederick Mowlem in November 1924. Allen and Hickson had designed one long building to stretch between Cuba Street and The Square, however, only this part was built to their plan. The above-verandah façade remains largely authentic – although it was designed to have “Mowlems Buildings” cut into the upper façade. Its building permit was issued in February 1925, and it was evidently complete by year’s end - the cost being £8,887. Fred Mowlem died in November 1925, and his wife Mary died in August 1926, however, it remained in the Mowlem family until sold to the Bares family in 1967. Designed with two shops and various offices and other small businesses upstairs, its major early tenant was the Para Rubber Co. Ltd., which occupied it between about 1934 and 1983.

 
125-128 The Square - Waldegrave Building

125-128 The Square - Waldegrave Building

John James Waldegrave arrived from England in 1855. The family settled in Palmerston North in 1872, where he established the first and second Royal Hotels in the Square. John Waldegrave, who had purchased this site in 1873, died in 1891. The Waldegrave Estate once had four buildings, including this one, on this property. The block stretched between King Street and the Square, although the second shop fronting the Square (built in 1934) is long gone. Tenders were called to erect this building in May 1932 - the successful contractor being H.C. Townsend, at a cost of £6,590. Thorrold-Jaggard was the architect. The building consisted of shops and a number of other businesses upstairs. R. Hannah & Co.’s shoe store moved into this building. In 1936, the shops included Blandford’s furriers, and J.R. Wood Ltd., chemist. By 1943, Boots (NZ) Ltd. occupied the chemist shop, and a pharmacy continued to operate from this building until recent years.

 
Te Rau Aroha' Maori Battalion Hall /  Te Wananga O Aotearoa, Cuba Street

Te Rau Aroha' Maori Battalion Hall / Te Wananga O Aotearoa, Cuba Street

The Maori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Maori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Maori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. At the time this photo was taken, it served as the Visual Arts school of the Wananga O Aotearoa.

 
Sir Bernard Fergusson and John Mason Durie at Opening of Maori Battalion Hall

Sir Bernard Fergusson and John Mason Durie at Opening of Maori Battalion Hall

The Maori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Maori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Maori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. The man to his left is Hoani Meihana Te Rama Durie, also known as John Mason Durie (1889–1972). Mayor Gilbert Rennie was also in attendance, as well as a number of Maori veterans.

Creator
Date
June 27, 1964
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Memorial, Maori Battalion Hall

Memorial, Maori Battalion Hall

Memorial alcove within the Maori Battalion Hall on the corner of Cuba and Pitt Streets. Inscribed on brass plates are the names of soliders from the 28th Maori Battalion who died while serving overseas, with photographs of members surrounding the panels. Four carved wooden statues, each uniquely identifying A, B, C & D companies of the Battalion, lie in the foreground on either side of the alcove.

 
Opening of Maori Battalion Hall

Opening of Maori Battalion Hall

The Maori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Maori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Maori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. Mayor Gilbert Rennie was also in attendance, as well as a number of Maori veterans.

Creator
Date
June 27, 1964
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Durie Hill Memorial Tower, Whanganui

Durie Hill Memorial Tower, Whanganui

Constructed in 1925, the Durie Hill Memorial Tower is the official Wanganui Memorial to the 513 people from the district who died in World War One. The tower is 33.5 metres high (104 feet) and the lookout deck is 113 metres (372.2 feet) above sea level and provides panoramic views of the city.

 
Durie Hill Memorial Tower, Whanganui

Durie Hill Memorial Tower, Whanganui

Constructed in 1925, the Durie Hill Memorial Tower is the official Wanganui Memorial to the 513 people from the district who died in World War One. The tower is 33.5 metres high (104 feet) and the lookout deck is 113 metres (372.2 feet) above sea level and provides panoramic views of the city.

 
Opening of Maori Battalion Hall

Opening of Maori Battalion Hall

The Maori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Maori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Maori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. Mayor Gilbert Rennie was also in attendance, as well as a number of Maori veterans.

Creator
Date
June 27, 1964
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Opening of Maori Battalion Hall

Opening of Maori Battalion Hall

The Maori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Maori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Maori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. Mayor Gilbert Rennie was also in attendance, as well as a number of Maori veterans.

Creator
Date
June 27, 1964
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Opening of Maori Battalion Hall

Opening of Maori Battalion Hall

The Maori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Maori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Maori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson. Mayor Gilbert Rennie was also in attendance, as well as a number of Maori veterans.

Creator
Date
June 27, 1964
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
 
Maori Battalion Hall

Maori Battalion Hall

The Maori Battalion Hall, named 'Te Rau Aroha' (emblem of gratitude), was erected in Palmerston North as a national memorial to the men of the 28th (Maori) Battalion who lost their lives in the Second World War. It was designed by John Scott, architect of Hastings, and the 14 carved panels on the facade (8 feet x 1 foot 6 inches) were carved by Kelly Kereama of Feilding. Inside 639 names of those who did not return are inscribed on 14 brass plates. All the concrete, both inside and out, was left unplastered and with the marks of the boxing to symbolise the strength of the Maori people. The three-storey building was planned as a community centre to serve all races and was opened in June 1964 by the Governor General, Sir Bernard Fergusson.

Creator
Date
August 21, 1966
Place
Corner of Cuba and Pitt Street, Palmerston North
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